What Happens After You Finish Your Part of the house, and Then The House Is Finished?

images-2Modern home building takes a lot of people. Concrete, Carpentry, Heating and Air, Paint, Drywall, Insulation, Electrical, Plumbing and many others. These professionals work on the house at various times. Usually there is a sequence, the foundation is done before the framing, the roof is done before inside work gets very far. Toward the end, it can get somewhat hectic. Everyone is trying to finish. The deadline is looming. Painters, trim carpentry, flooring, plumbing, final electrical installations are all happening.

One of the last things is the final work on the Heating and Air Conditioning system. This cannot happen until after the electrician is finished, and if you have a gas furnace, the plumbing must be there. Some of the work by the HVAC contractor was completed before the drywall went up. The duct work was installed and the inside unit of the system was probably put in place and hooked up to the duct work.

If the home is built on a 120 – 150 day schedule, the initial work, rough-in, on the duct system would happen about 1/3 of the way. Then about 2/3 of the waywall_duct, the Heating and Air techs are back to install the thermostat, the outside unit, hook up the electric and finish the job.

Last week, I went out to complete a rating on a new home. I had completed some testing on the duct system at rough-in. I used a Duct Blaster unit and testing the duct system for Total Leakage. I got a great number. There is a professional standard, issued ACCA (Air Conditioning Contractors of America) for this test. It is based on the size of the amount of air flow pushed through the system by the fan; in this case it would have been about 1,200 cubic feet per minute.

The standard is 10% of system air flow or in this case 120 CFM. In a previous blog post, I discussed a test where the system leaked over 100% of system air flow. This is an important test, because it can be compared to the test done at rough in.ACCA_5

The rough in test for Total Duct Leakage came in at 4.8% of system air flow. This is a very good number and typical for this HVAC contractor. Now at final, the total leakage was 16%. Wow! What happened?

I cleaned up and left the house about 6:00 for the weekend. Sleeping on the ‘What Happened?’ seemed like a great idea. I did just that.

Tuesday, I went back to take another look. I would conduct some additional testing to see if the leak(s) could be isolated. I started by removing the grills that fan the air out through each room. That would be easy and fast. So, the first few looked pretty good. It was going fast, I kept going and half way through I found one that showed some problems. At the end 1/3 of these grills had a significant problem.

Duct BootAs you can see the vent in the wall, had the drywall cut too large for the duct. The openings ranged from a quarter inch to over an inch wide, all around the opening. The air instead of 100% leaving the duct system into the room, was being pushed back into the wall. The idea of the duct system is to put the hot or cooled/dehumidified air into the room where the people are. A grill can do a great job of sending the air into various parts of the room. A good grill for one place may be absolutely the wrong grill for another place. Grill manufacturers refer to this as ‘Throw’. If you have the wrong throw on your grill, you aren’t getting much comfort from your system.

The infrared image, below, shows the outside of a wall in the winter (It was 20° F that morning). The hot area below the window is from the grill directing the heat up the wall, not out into the room. I found this condition on an audit last winter and made two alternate recommendations for the home owner. The cost was less than $20.00 for either one. The problem was fixed the same day by the homeowner.exterior_wall

Back to fixing the leaks! I filled the cracks and gaps in the poorly cut openings, replaced the grills and then set up to re-test the duct system. The leakage was back to the original number.

This shows the value of testing your work. We work with Quality Control Systems in our everyday work life. As consumers we depend on the quality of the products we buy. We see how companies respond when they are faced with a quality issue. A number years ago a lot of Tylenol was recalled. A few bottles had been tampered with, not really the manufacturer’s fault. They recalled anyway and their customers were well served. In the past few years, several auto manufacturers have had some problems with their cars, and they did not promptly recall the cars to fix the problem.

qcApplying good quality control lets the customers and the management of a company know the level of quality. The company can make drugs, cars, or install your heating and air system. In this case the quality work done by the Heating and Air techs was changed by another person working on the job. Good quality control found the problem. The fix took only a few minutes. Now the home buyer will not experience the discomfort from a badly installed duct system. I will not get a call in a few years because the home owner is not comfortable. The heating and air techs will not have a lot of call backs.

My thanks today goes to the crew at Cooks Heating and Air in Wichita. They did the quality work and deserve the credit. I am lucky to be able to work with people like this.

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