Category Archives: Attic

What is an Energy Audit Worth?

Hose and bucketSeveral years ago, I wrote a post about the value of an Energy Audit.

The story behind that audit was one side.  Improved Comfort. This time it is about the other side.  Decreased Cost of Operation.

An home energy audit reviews the ability of your home to retain the heated air from your HVAC System in the winter and the cooled air in the summer. The best metaphor I’ve seen is to compare the Thermal Enclosure to a Bucket of Water. The picture above is a good example.  The hose is like the HVAC System. It fills the house with hot air in the winter and cool air in the summer.  The Bucket allows the conditioned  to leave the home.

The result of the energy audit is to prioritize which holes to fix first, second and third. Some of this is about how big a thermal leak the hole is, and some of this is about cost.

Attics are less costly to insulate than walls.  There is room for more insulation, it is not a lengthy process, and there is nothing like patching holes after you have insulated.

This home had the improvements made as recommended by the audit, in February 2012.  The energy usage for 36 months prior to and now 36 months after the improvements is now available.

The 3 year average for annual energy use before the improvements is 34,972 KWH.

The 3 year average for annual energy use after the improvements is 18,940 KWH.

A decrease of 45% in energy used.  The bills are paid in dollars, so why refer to an energy measure.  Using energy measures means future increases in Utility Rates are not considered.  Will those increases happen?  Yes! Not counting on them is important. Did they happen during this 6 year period.  Yes, several times. So the results are about actual savings.

IMG_1272 copy

Here is Brian, blowing insulation into the walls. The walls before the work started were uninsulated. If this home had been stucco or brick, this step would not have been cost effective.  The material is cellulose, providing an R-13 in the wall. Cellulose is easy to install in this application. This crew had done this many times and the experience is worth a lot.

IMG_1340 copyThe image on the right is the attic. As you can see there is a little insulation in there before work started.  That meant the crew could do the air sealing first.  Fibrous insulation like the rock wool you see, or the cellulose that was added, does not stop air movement.  Warm air from inside easily goes up into the attic and outside. Good crews air seal before they insulate. They are already up there.  A caulking gun is not hard to carry along.  See those wires,  the electrician drilled a one inch hole to put the wire through.  Lots of air leakage.

Here is a picture I took last winter.  New snow the night before  on the roof of this house. Note the hole near the edge of the roof in the snow cover.  That hole in the snow is right over the outside wall and there is a light switch, or outlet on the wall below it.  Air Leak copy

 

Millennials Seek Smaller Homes, Energy Efficiency, Won’t Sacrifice Details

Originally Published on the NAHB Website
http://nahbnow.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/507029289.jpg

Laundry Room

The survey says: No laundry room = no sale.

 

As Millennials begin to enter the home buying market in larger numbers, homes will get a little smaller, laundry rooms will be essential, and home technology increasingly prevalent, said panelists during an International Builders’ Show press conference on home trends and Millennials’ home preferences last week.

NAHB Assistant VP of Research Rose Quint predicted that the growing numbers of first-time buyers will drive down home size in 2015. Three million new jobs were created in 2014, 700,000 more than the previous year “and the most since 1999,” Quint said. At the same time, regulators have reduced downpayment requirements for first-time buyers from 5% to 3% and home prices have seen only moderate growth.

“All these events lead me to believe that more people will come into the market, and as younger, first-time buyers, they will demand smaller, more affordable homes,” Quint said. “Builders will build whatever demand calls out for.”

Quint also unveiled the results of two surveys: one asking home builders what features they are most likely to include in a typical new home this year, and one asking Millennials what features are most likely to affect their home buying decisions.

Of the Top 10 features mentioned by home builders, four have to do with energy efficiency: Low-E windows, Energy Star-rated appliances and windows and programmable thermostats. The top features: master bedroom walk-in closets and a separate laundry room.

Least likely features include high-end outdoor kitchens with plumbing and appliances and two-story foyers and family rooms. “Consumers don’t like them anymore, so builders aren’t going to build them,” Quint said.

When NAHB asked Millennials what features fill their “most-wanted” shopping list, a separate laundry room was clearly on top, with 55% responding that they just wouldn’t buy a new home that didn’t have one.

Storage is also important, with linen closets, a walk-in pantry and garage storage making the Top 10 – along with Energy Star certifications. In fact, this group is willing to pay 2-3% more for energy efficiency as long as they can see a return on their power bills.

If they can’t quite afford that first home, respondents said they’d be happy to sacrifice extra finished space or drive a little farther to work, shops and schools, but are unwilling to compromise with less expensive materials.

A whopping 75% of this generation wants to live in single-family homes, and 66% prefer to live in the suburbs. Only 10% say they want to stay in the central city. Compared to older generations, Millennials are more likely to want to live downtown, but it’s still a small minority share, Quint said.

Panelist Jill Waage, editorial director for home content at Better Homes and Gardens, discussed Millennials’ emphasis on the importance of outdoor living and that generation’s seamless use of technology, and how those two trends play into their home buying and home renovation decisions.

Because they generally don’t have as much ready cash or free time as older home owners, Millennials seek less expensive, low-maintenance choices like a brightly painted front door, strings of garden lights and landscaping that needs less watering and mowing, like succulent plants and larger patios.

They’re also very comfortable with their smartphones and tablets, and increasingly seek ways to control their heating and air-conditioning and security and lighting as well as electronics like televisions and sound systems from their phones. “They want to use their brains for other things, not for remembering whether they adjusted the heat or closed the garage door,” Waage said.

Get more details about the NAHB survey in this post from Eye on the Economy.

I emphasized the two comments about Energy Efficient Features NAHB found.  If you would like help in addressing these in a cost effective manner for your buyers, Call The Energy Guy!

Indoor Air Quality Evaluations

The quality of the Indoor Air of our homes and offices is an important part of our health and comfort.

There is not much sense in putting a lot of good insulation into a building if it is:

  • Not Structurally Sound
  • Not Healthy

What types of things can be done to improve the Indoor Air Quality of any home or property?

  1. The immediate environment of the structure must be kept separate from the inside.
  2. The required fresh air that is needed, in every one of our buildings, should be filtered and otherwise treated for comfort and to remove pollutants.
  3. The pollutants that are created during the normal operation of our building must be eliminated, removed, replaced, diluted or neutralized.
  4. Moisture in any form must be controlled , and then removed avoiding any accumulation.
  5. Any and all accumulations of moisture damage or animal infestation must be cleaned up and damaged building components replaced.
  • A Full Indoor Air Quality evaluation must address all of those concerns.
  • Full interior visual inspection
  • Full exterior visual inspection
  • Testing of the building enclosure to ensure the outside stays outside
    • Infrared Evaluation as part of the above testing
  • Inspection of HVAC Duct Work and systems that move air.
  • Combustion Safety Inspection on open combustion appliances
    • Moisture, Carbon Monoxide, N02, SO2 and others
  • Infrared and other testing for moisture accumulations.
  • Sample Collection of suspended and/or deposited material that are potential pollutants or irritants.
    • Examination and Evaluation by a certified Microbiological Laboratory of these samples.

This evaluation is typically completed in two visits to the home or business. Level I Evaluation and Testing is non-destructive and not invasive.

Level II Evaluation and Testing involves invasive inspections. These may be as simple as drilling a few holes for visual inspection or sampling. It may involve removing obviously damaged building material, that requires replacement, for example wet drywall.

Contact The Energy Guy for further information about an Indoor Air Quality Evaluation.

Who Is Building an Igloo in Wichita?

It all started on Twitter. @AIAWichita @moongodess316 and I had some fun over building an Igloo.

Igloo1

I saw this Tweet and immediately thought of a quote from Dr. Joseph Lstiburek: “The Igloo was the First Passive House.” Joe is an engineer by training and has been working with buildings, insulation and energy use for over 30 years. His Building Science Corporation, based in Massachusetts, conducts research and is one of the best sources of verified information on building energy efficiency in buildings.

So I tweeted back.

Igloo2

What is the difference between a Passive House and a regular house? What is the buzz all about?

Strawbale

When you build a home you can use lots of insulation to reduce the amount of electricity and gas to heat and cool the home.

GSHP Diagram

You can use a lot of high tech equipment to reduce the amount of electricity and gas to heat and cool the home. You can also do both.

PHIUSThe Passive House was developed in Germany, so you see it referred to at times as Passiv Haus.

We know that insulation works and that more insulation works better. As the cost of electric and gas goes up, it makes financial sense to add insulation to a home or business. In 2000, the local cost of Electricity was 8 – 9 cents, the recommended level of attic insulation was R-30. Today the cost of electricity is 12 – 13 cents and the recommended level of insulation is R-49.  Both have increased about 1/3 in 1 years. We also know that air movement, cold drafts, makes people uncomfortable and causes insulation to not work as effectively.

Round Metal TubeThe sources of air entering a home are usually related to corners. Since we like living in buildings that have square corners there are a lot of them in a home. Windows do not usually cause air leakage. How they are installed can cause air leakage. The age or the quality of the window does not seem to matter when installation mistakes occur.

PHIThe primary requirements for a passive ouse certification are based on Energy Usage and creating a structure that needs very little energy for heating and cooling. These standards are effectively summarized with these two limits.

  • Total primary energy (source energy for electricity, etc.) consumption (primary energy for heating, hot water and electricity) must not be more than 120 kWh/m² per year (37900 btu/ft² per year)
  • The building must not leak more air than 0.6 times the house volume per hour (n50 ≤ 0.6 / hour) at 50 Pa (N/m²) as tested by a blower door.

In our Twitter Conversation, Angee McBustee tweeted a question about how is building a igloo in Wichita. Then I responded with the offer to run the blower door test. As you can see from the primary requirements the Blower Door result is very important to a passive house.

Igloo4

How good is a Blower Door Test of 0.6, as required by Passive House? Energy Star New Homes require a Blower Door Test of 5.0 or less. New homes in Wichita routinely test around 4.0. In the blower door testing, lower is better.

For standard construction, I have tested several homes at 1.0. There is one home that I have tested with a lower result. A custom home in Butler County is under construction. They had me do a Blower Door test after it was sheathed. No insulation, no drywall. The test result was 0.62. We were able to find several leaks using biometrics and the infrared camera. That was last September. I returned in December to test it a 2nd time, the results were so low, that I didn’t have the right test equipment to measure the result. I would estimate it to be in the 0.30 range. I now have the equipment to test a home like that.

In February, I have been accepted for training and certification as a Passive House Rater/Verifier. Christine is building the home in Butler County, I want to thank her for the push to obtain this certification.

In the Twitter Conversation, AIA Wichita came back and said they were posting an information tweet.

Thanks to Angee and AIA Wichita for a nice idea for a Blog Post.

A Healthy Home Part 3 — Well Ventilated

Fresh AirA Healthy Home is well ventilated.  Everyone knows fresh air is important. This should be easy.  Well ventilated in more than just bringing in fresh air. The concepts are certainly easy, the details on the other hand take some thought and planning.  A new home ventilation strategy is fairly straight forward to design and implement. An existing home needs the input from the occupants and good analysis to address the problems. An effective ventilation strategy should address these issues in either new or existing homes.

  • Remove humidity, odors,, or significant problems from specific areas.
  • Remove stale, musty or other objectionable air.
  • Allow the occupants to choose fresh air sources that can be filtered or treated in other ways
  • Allow the occupants to choose to open windows when outside weather is appropriate
  • Allow the occupants to operate a system that can provide the amount of fresh air, to the appropriate places, in adequate amounts when needed
  • Provide fresh air when the outside air creates potential problems, such as Ragweed season or when other allergens are active
  • Provide air movement within the home, without the use of the expensive blower on the furnace or heat pump.
  • Allow minimal use of heating or cooling equipment during the shoulder seasons, when temperature changes are minimal, while keeping the home comfortable.

Billings QuoteHow much fresh air is needed?  Going back to the 1890’s, the number has been pegged at 30 CFM (cubic feet per minute) per person. This number was validated in a number of different studies and with the public health authorities in larger cities, dealing with large apartment buildings and recurring respiratory diseases.  I was pointed to the quote at the left by Allison Bailles. he located the original book on Google Books, page 20.

Beginning in the 1930s, research into changes in building techniques began to show the optimal number was closer to 15 CFM per person.  Some of the changes in construction included the increased use of forced air heating, moving from balloon framing to platform framing, increasing square footage, and the use of insulation in walls and attics. The formula changes from time to time and everyone has an opinion on details. The common point remains, fresh air is needed in every house.

Part of the Ventilation is removing air with a problem. Where is that?  Humidity is found in rooms that use hot water and basements.  Showers, tubs and cooking are the large sources of humidity.  The smells from food preparation and cooking can be very mouthwatering.  When the meal is finished and the refrigerator is full, the lingering smells become odors.  The answer is some spot ventilation in these areas. If your basement has a humidity problem, you can tackle that with a fitted sump pump cover to contain the humidity, and work to eliminate any water seepage.

vent fanSpot ventilation is a window that opens and an exhaust fan. The size of these fans is part of the formula that is specific to each home. The features of the fan are common to all homes.  It must be quiet. Builder grade fans are noisy. Noise in fans is measured in ‘Sones’. The Sone is a linear measurement of noise, compared to the decibels used by OSHA and others which is an exponential measurement.  Linear is better for quiet sounds, and decibels is better for loud noises. Fans should be less than 3 sones, and preferably less than 1 sone.  Reasonably priced fans are available that rate a 0.3 sones. A 1 sone fan is very quiet.

UnknownFans are certified for air flow and noise levels by the Home Ventilation Institute. HVI certification is very common and includes both the Sone rating and CFM rating.  When installing a fan, you must consider the duct losses that will occur in meeting the required air flow.   The rates for bathroom air flow  are 50 CFM, and 100 CFM for a kitchen.  Do not expect to buy a 50 CFM fan for a bathroom and connect it to 6 or 8 feet of duct work, and obtain 50 CFM.  I have measured 30 CFM routinely in these set ups.

Most people understand that various parts of their body are just a part of the whole.  If you start some type of therapy, there may be a side effect. Physical Therapy starts and you end up with some sore muscles, aha!  Side Effect!  Start a therapy for cancer and your hair may fall out, aha! Side Effect!  Your home works the same way.  Each part is just part of the whole. Change something, aha! What is the side effect?

House-System-imgAll of the items in the list above are part of the whole. For an existing home, some specifics of that house may indicate concentration on one or another of those areas.  A home built in the 1920’s will benefit from a different approach then a house built in the 1980’s.

A new home should have the ventilation system that meets the general points above.  The natural ventilation provided when windows and doors are opened, or the mechanical ventilation system that allows filtered and perhaps treated fresh air brought in from specific places and in specific amounts, allow the occupants to make the system work as they need.

 

This post is part of a Series on A Healthy Home

 

 

A Healthy House Part 1c: How Dry is Dry

rainIn Part 1a, we have looked at how your builder builds your home to keep water from the outside from damaging your home.  He used materials to shed the water and he lapped them over each other, from the roof peak and the shingles all the way down to the ground. And then directed the water away from the house, using gutters and sloping the landscape away from the house. Easy, quick and it looks nice.

In Part 1b, we looked at how your builder builds your home on the inside to keep water where you want it, and provide easy clean up when it does get out of the pipes, the sink, tub or shower.

BucketYou can think of this as bulk water.  You can see it, this is water that is usually measured in quarts or gallons, and it is responsible for 50 – 60 % of the water damage that occurs over time. The exact percentage depends on the source doing the figuring.  So why is there a Part 1c?   There is one remaining source of moisture in most homes.  Water Vapor.  Hard to see it, hard to measure it.  The damage water vapor causes is usually found to be very extensive.

If you have a roof leak, it usually ends up inside and you find it while it is relatively small. When it is fixed the damage is limited and fairly easy to fix.  Leaks from plumbing and over flowing sinks and tubs, is usually caught very fast. The surface is easy to clean up and many times contains the water.  Damage from these sources doesn’t really occur unless the water continues over time to get there.  It stays wet and is not allowed to dry out.

Flood type events are not really of concern here. When they happen, the homeowner is aware, his insurance may cover repairs and there are lots of contractors that will do the work. Generally, they have little to do with how the house was built.

teapotWater vapor is present in varying amounts in every home.  What is the relative humidity in the home?  40% – 25% – 65%?  That is water vapor in the air. We add to that from breathing, cooking, and hygiene activities, like showers and running hot water for various purposes.

How do we control this water vapor?

Spot ventilation.  This may be as simple as opening a window next to the stove where the pasta is boiling, or the tea pot is ready to pour. It may be using an exhaust fan over the stove to actually remove the water vapor from cooking out of the house. Same in the shower.

acWhen the heat and humidity arrive around here, in the summer, it is air-conditioning season. Most air conditioners will lower the temperature of the air and remove some of the humidity at the same time.  Somedays they do a great job, somedays the ac unit really has to work and it.  Occasionally, you will find a unit that makes the room fairly cold, and you just feel clammy.  Like you just walked in from 100° outside and you are wet all over. The trouble is, it doesn’t go away.  You keep feeling cold and clammy.

That is the first way that water vapor causes a problem with our homes, it makes us uncomfortable.

How does the water vapor move into the walls and attic to cause problems like the liquid or bulk water we looked at?  It has two ways to move.  Air Movement and Vapor Diffusion.

Vapor Diffusion involves moving a vapor, in this case water.  It involves temperature and pressure.  It also involves Math, lots of fancy math.  I know some math teachers that can run these numbers, and a couple of physicists here in Kansas.  I’m sure the characters on TV’s ‘Big Bang Theory’ could run the numbers.

Adding MachineThe good news is, we don’t have to run the numbers.  If you take a room in your home with the humidity at 40% and 70° –  you will find less than a gallon of actual water.  By the time all the numbers are done, the answer is:  Yes – Vapor Diffusion put some of that water vapor into the wall.  And we can test that the 7% moisture content of the drywall, studs and other parts of the wall, is now 7.5 or 8%.  Not much change.   If you have read much on this blog, you know I lower my blood pressure by turning wood, into bowls.  Anything less than 12% moisture content in wood is considered dry.

If the builder bought kiln dried lumber, and kept the rain off it, while the house was built, the wood is probably 8 – 9 % moisture content when the home is finished.  Kiln dried lumber is typically 6 – 8 %.  Moving from an enclosed type shed to the job site, wood will pick up a little moisture.

What about air movement and water vapor?  That is the one to take care of.  Uncontrolled air movement takes the water vapor right along with it. When that vapor comes in contact with a surface that is below the current dew point, it will condense and the liquid wets the material.  We know that energy savings is easy to obtain with air sealing.  So fixing the air leaks is good for stopping the water vapor from making our house wet also.   How much?  This graphic from the guys at Building Science Corporation shows how much.

Air_Vapor

This post is part of a series of posts on A Healthy Home.

Using One HVAC System for Two Areas

My first audit was triggered by the homeowner concerned that the upstairs was several degrees warmer than downstairs. Since we all have experienced Hot Air  goes up, it makes some sense.  In this case the difference was 15° F at 8:00 am, rising to 20° F by noon that August morning.  Yes, it was hot.

4 square craftsmanThere are a number of ways to help this out, for existing homes. Which one is best depends on the specific home, the existing setup and the homeowner.  For new homes, it usually falls to the HVAC guys to work out.

In a new 2 story home, it is common to see two HVAC units.  One in the basement for most of the home and one in the attic for the second floor.  Some builders, concerned with cost, or space considerations, will try a Zoned System.  You can also find Zoned Systems in single story homes, with the master suite on one zone and the rest of the home on another zone.

furnace bypass zoneTypically, the set up uses a bypass and several dampers to control the air.  The wisdom of this approach is that changing the air flow through the unit costs a lot of $$$$.

In the video below, John Proctor, goes through the measurements and calculations of using or not using a bypass and dampers to figure out exactly what is happening.  His conclusion:  The Bypass Damper set up costs 22% – 32% more.

This video is primarily written for HVAC contractors and others interested in the details and workings of air conditioning.  If all the numbers make your eyes glaze over, that is OK.  All you want is comfort, a Bypass dampened system may do that at a cost. It may have the cost and not do that.  So if you are considering a Zoned HVAC system,  tell your contractor —  ‘No Bypass Dampers’!  And refer them to this post.

Those Pesky Directions

How many times have you started into a project and had to stop and redo some steps?  How many times have you finished and then realized that you had extra parts?  So what do we do?

Insulation RulerWe go back and read the directions! The manual!  It is so common there are several acronyms for reading the manual.  Directions written by the manufacturer serve several purposes. Some of the cynics around, including myself, realize there is a bit of self promotion and defense in these instructions.  We should also realize that the manufacturer has probably tried to put a few of these together. He may be sharing his wheel with us, so we don’t have to invent it ourselves.

Most importantly, the manufacturer knows how the piece was engineered. The directions take that knowledge and apply it to how the equipment is set up, used or installed. Equipment changes over time. New features are added, materials change and the way it used to be done, is not a good idea.  So, read the manual.

See the attic rafters above. This is the top of a vaulted ceiling, and the insulator has properly placed an insulation ruler.  In a few weeks, blown insulation will be installed and the tech needs to measure how much. The use of the ruler and blowing the insulation level are two of the biggest helps to installing blown attic insulation.  And Yes! They are in the manual!

The choice of this picture isn’t the insulation ruler, it is the nail grid on the ceiling joists. Machine applied in the truss shop, it is fast easy and effective.  Notice the upper right hand corner of the grid.  That is a sharp edge. Be careful, it will cut things.  Hands, pants, shoe tops. Yes! All of those and don’t ask me how I know that!  My wife makes me carry a first aid kit with lots of bandaids for a reason.Duct 1

The house I finished a rating on yesterday had these nail grids on the floor trusses between the basement and the main floor. It also had the HVAC Ducts run between and through the trusses.  The contractor on this job uses sheet metal supply plenums and take offs. He uses the flex duct to form the return air side of his duct system. Yes!  Flex duct gets torn also. Especially with a nail grid.

Two weeks ago, I tested this home. The duct system was very leaky.  According to the Quality Installation Verification Standard written by the Air Conditioning Contractors of America, it was leaking 100%. Wow!  I’ve tested this contractors work before. He always does better than this.  So I ran the test again. Checked my set up.  No change. So I called him.  Shon came right out.  He looked over the system and immediately saw a couple of problems. Including this section of flex duct.

ZeroNow, two weeks later, his crew has reworked their ducts. I’m back to test it again.  I run the same test and scratch my head.  What leakage –  I can get the readings right. The picture left shows no air flow, on the right side, and a very low pressure difference, on the left side of my manometer.  The procedure is to have the Blower Door depressurized the house. Then you depressurized the duct system with the duct blaster to equalize the pressure.  When the pressure difference comes down to Zero, you read the leakage to the outside of the house.

So I checked my set up and tested again. Still no readings.  So ….   I read the manual.  In this case a Field Guide from the Quality Folks at my RESNET Provider and The Energy Conservatory that makes my equipment. I read it twice.  Then it hit me.  This line: Check the duct pressure. A negative duct pressure indicates leakage to the outside. If the duct pressure measure Zero with the Blower Door running, then the leakage to outside is Zero CFM.

As you can guess, the leaks when I tested two week previous prevented this result. What changed?  The crew had found a small tear in the flex from one of the nail grids. Did you see it in the picture up above?  I can see it because I know it is there.  So I enhanced the image and that one is posted below.  To get around all the reflections of the silver colored coating, I placed a piece of white plastic inside the flex so the hole would show.Duct 2

So reading those pesky directions on a test that I routinely run, gets me the right answer. What about the Heating and Air Contractor.  Shon does good work on his jobs, because he follows the professional guidelines and tests his work.  In this case he knew the test, he knew what it meant and immediately saw how to fix it.  What would have been the result if this basement had been finished out and then he had to remove drywall to fix it?

Why is ZERO duct leakage to the outside important?  I don’t want to pay money to heat or cool the outside. If your ducts leak very much to the outside or don’t distribute the air properly, then you are spending more than you need to.  Installing ducts with no leakage to the outside in a new home is an easy process for the contractor. It give the home owner a much better value.

DuctLeak2 copyYes!  I have found duct leakage behind drywall also.  Here is an infrared image of a finished basement ceiling. The homeowners complaint is there is no air flow into his bedroom and it is cold in the winter and hot in the summer. To get this image I turned the furnace up to about 80° F. It was usually about 73° F.  I stretched out on the basement floor and waiting for the heat from the furnace to leak into the cavity between the main floor and the basement ceiling.  In a couple of minutes I had heat patterns showing.  You can see where the duct is running up and down next to the floor joist. Interesting heat spot to the right next to the other joist. Also across the joist and over to the left joist. So we are seeing the duct and hot spots on each side 16 inches away.  Lots of lost heat not getting into his bedroom.

The home with the infrared picture had the leaks on the supply side of the duct system. The one I tested yesterday had the leaks fixed on the return side. I could not have tested with the infrared in the same way yesterday.

So, on this Independence Day, we celebrate!  We celebrate our freedom to be in a business we love, where we can do some good, and make a difference.  And yes, where we can make a living for our families.  We also celebrate the freedom to know our job, to continue to learn as things change and to utilize our professional standards to keep our customers happy and satisfied.

Have a Safe and Happy 4th of July!

Credits:  Photos, myself.  Insulation Ruler –  Northstar Comfort Systems Install.  Duct system install tested yesterday with no leakage to the outside — Shon Peterman and Midwest Mechanical.  The audit providing the infrared image, my customer Craig. The new home tested yesterday courtesy of Sharon and Wade Wilkinson of GJ Gardner Homes. It is in Fontana.

 

Private HERS Rated Homes

During 2013, New Home Builders in the US placed a HERS Rating on over 50% of the new homes built. Builders in most large housing markets have found that a HERS Rated Home sells faster than one that is not Rated.

Is the new home builder the only one that can place a rating on a home?  Actually anyone with an interest in the home can have a HERS Rating completed. The process is the same as when the builder completes the process.

Tonight a new home is on the page listing ‘Actual HERS Rated Homes’ .  This home is one the owner chose to have the HERS Rating completed.  It is being built in Derby, and is listed as Sold Projected. This home was planned to be lower than the standard new home. It is projected with an INDEX of 86.  It will come in lower.  The projected HERS process took into consideration the plan and the levels of insulation and equipment the owner and the builder have decided on.

HERS Rated Homes

HERS Rated Homes

The reports also show how much energy will be used in both heating seasons and cooling seasons by this home.  Several recommendations for cost effective improvements were made.  Several were based on simply lowering the annual utility bills of the home.  When the builder gets pricing for these improvements, the home buyer can make a good decision to proceed with that improvement or not.

Several of the additional insulation recommendations fall into this category. Several of these improvements were based on improving the comfort and Indoor air quality of the home. Again, when the builder has prices in hand the home buyer can make good decisions about these health and safety items. These items include improved equipment, and improved mechanical ventilation over the code required fresh air duct into the furnace.

Yes, there is no code adopted and enforced in the Wichita area requiring insulation in a new home. There is a code item that requires fresh air to be brought in. I have yet to see a new home without provision for a dryer and spot ventilation fans in the bathrooms. The fresh air is needed to compensate for these items.  If it is not provided, these fans will cause fresh air to come in where it can, not where you want.

When think of  a Heating and Air contractor, you have seen them referred to as HVAC Contractors.  The V is for Ventilation.

Remember to ask your Builder for the HERS Rating when you look at a new home. If the builder isn’t Rating his homes, you can obtain a HERS Rating for your favorite model.

What Tools do you carry in your Tool kit?

I have all sorts of small items in mine; a list would include flashlight,  screwdriver, hammer, tape measures, wrenches, my blower door and infrared imaging camera.  Plus a bunch of flashlights. Yep!  A bunch of flashlights.  I like those everywhere, usually two at a time.flashlights

What kind of tools do you carry?

furnaceAn HVAC Tech might have the first part of my list, and a set of pressure gauges and thermometers instead of my specialized equipment.  Yes, I don’t really need his specialized equipment.

An Install Tech for an Insulation Company would probably have the general stuff and some specialized tools like an insulation blower, staple guns, and an air compressor.

Yes, the work you do requires certain tools. Most tools are fairly general and found in almost everyone’s tool kit, some are specialized to the work we do.

Now that I have pointed out the obvious, everyone maybe wondering why I’m thinking about tools and home performance. So lets connect the dots a little.

First, what happens if you get to the job and you can’t find a screw driver?  It has happened to me more than once!  I just hate that!  How many knife blades have we broken on our pocket knives when we find ourselves in that position?  We still have a job to do and the wrong tool takes longer, sometimes with banged knuckles.

What happens when the products or services we provide to our customers, can perhaps meet their need, like the blade on a pocket knife, but do not meet the need like a screwdriver?  That is the position many in the building performance are find themselves in.  They have a customer that is uncomfortable in their own home or a business with uncomfortable employees and customers.  How does the management design a solution for their techs to implement and thus satisfy their customer, making them comfortable again.  As a business, we each try to provide the solution to the customer from our stock.  That is how we get paid. You don’t pay the mechanic that fixes your car, when the plumbing needs to be fixed.  You pay the plumber, after the drain works again.

So you have a room that is Hot in the Summer and Cold in the winter?  Who do you call and what solution do the problem do you implement?Insulation Blown

If you call a Heating / Cooling contractor, they have equipment on the shelf, probably not insulation. So you will have a proposal to change your equipment for bigger units or perhaps to add a unit. The proposal will certainly involve equipment.  After all, if your mid size car gets you to the store, a larger car will get you there with more comfort.  Would you expect your HVAC contractor to recommend insulation?

What is the actual answer to to your comfort situation? Larger equipment with more punch or some insulation?  What if your solution does not involve either equipment or insulation?

Now we are back to the tools of our Trades!  What tools do you have?  Equipment, Insulation, Air Sealing, Windows?  The solutions you provide must involve the tools of your trade. That is why a savvy homeowner might consult with more than one contractor.  That is a great argument for savvy contractors to partner with contractors and others that work on changing the energy use in your home or business. Why should a good contractor limit themselves to providing only part of the solution.

Air SealingThis is happening in many areas of the country.  Contractors are partnering with others in their area to build home performance teams. There are contractors in Wichita that are moving in this direction.  I think that is great!

Deciding on the measures that will solve your comfort concerns, while bringing down your energy costs, involves a team that includes all of the contractors and a Energy Specialist that does not have a product on the shelf to sell you. The ability to recommend, without having a financial interest in the products, has been valued by many home owners. An Audit by Efficient Energy Savers, provides you with the independence in evaluation, and recommendations needed to get the answer you are actually looking for.