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A few minutes ago, I posted a Press Release on changes to the 2015 Energy Codes.  If you read the list of groups supporting this change, you will find me listed.

Energy Codes have been in existence since 1992. They require levels of insulation, other energy efficient features and address how these items are installed.  There have been adjustments to them over the years. As the cost of electricity and other forms of energy rise, increasing the levels of insulation makes financial sense. As companies develop new products, for example the green sheathing used on many new homes in the Wichita area.

Wichita / Sedgwick County have not chosen to adopt an Energy Code. There is no legal requirement to build a home or building in Wichita and install insulation.

I support this change in the enforcement of codes because it is a ‘Free Market’ approach to the problem.

When people hear a home can be legally built with no insulation, they are very surprised.  Their expectation is that government requires that.  When my daughter was looking at buying a home in 2007-08; I heard one builder’s sales person tell her: “We build Energy Efficient Homes! We used to put R-19 in the attic; now with put R-25! That is Energy Efficient!”  Yet, the recommended code at that time for Wichita called for R-38 in the attic.

A ‘Free Market’ has been defined as the price a willing and informed seller and a willing and informed buyer agree upon!  I think that is important, to have willing and informed sellers and buyers.

If you don’t have an informed buyer; you can’t have a free market.  Consumers want something they value, if they are informed, they can make a decision that meets their needs. It may be a different decision than you would make with the same information.

This proposal would allow a builder to choose to add extra insulation to a home or to install more efficient equipment to his home as they choose to meet or exceed the competition.

This proposal allows a local government to require a level of energy performance from new homes. It allows the builder to decide how he wants to achieve that level. It doesn’t not require the local government to hire any additional inspectors or add training to existing inspectors.

When you look at buying a car, you can look at the Mileage Sticker on the window.  You may or may not use that in your final decision.  With this in the code, you can look at the sticker on the electrical box.  Then you can choose to use it or not use it in your decision.

A few years from now, when a new home is resold, the sticker will be there. Consumers can look at it and make informed decisions again.

Disclosure:  Yes,  part of our business is to Rate Homes for Energy Efficiency! This proposal if adopted by local governments could increase business.  It would also spur competition. It would not stop a home builder from training one of his employees to Rate his homes.  It would not stop an independent group, for example the Builders Association, from training someone and offering Ratings services to their members. It would not stop Energy Related Subcontractors from training an employee and offering Ratings to their customers.

The Press Release with links is found HERE

Builders and Efficiency Advocates Reach New Homes Energy Code Change Agreement

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Press contact: Chris Potter, (202) 525-2883 x. 311, chris@imt.org

Builders and Efficiency Advocates Reach New Homes Energy Code Change Agreement ?Efficiency Rating System Proposal Would Lead to the Largest Triennial Energy Use Reduction in U.S. History

WASHINGTON (August 21, 2013) – Three energy efficiency proponents interested in stronger and more cost-effective residential energy codes have reached an unprecedented agreement with the Leading Builders of America, which represents almost 40 percent of the new single-family home market, to support a proposal that could save homebuyers about $850 annually and give builders greater flexibility to meet energy-saving targets.

Today’s announcement by the Leading Builders of America (LBA), Institute for Market Transformation (IMT), Natural Resources Defense Council, and the Britt/Makela Group comes in advance of next week’s (Aug. 26) publication of proposals to be considered by the International Code Council (ICC) in October, when code officials vote on proposed changes to the 2015 edition of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC).

Duke Energy, Air Conditioning Contractors of America, Insulate America, and Masco Home Services have signed on in support of the agreement, along with almost 90 other utilities, custom home builders, energy efficiency service providers, homeowner warranty providers, and other organizations from around the country. (To see the full list of supporters, click here).

“This agreement is an example of what can be accomplished when diverse groups work together to achieve a common goal. The result in this case will benefit literally hundreds of thousands of homeowners for decades to come,” said Steve Hilton, Chairman and CEO of Phoenix-based Meritage Homes and chair of LBA’s Energy Working Group.

The groups are supporting standards to reduce energy use in new homes by about 20 percent in 2015, taking energy efficiency to a new level and representing one of the largest triennial reductions ever under the U.S. model building energy code. The agreement gives builders the ability to use a “whole house” approach known as an Energy Rating Index (ERI), which is a consumer-friendly benchmark that will allow buyers to estimate annual energy savings and compare efficiencies between homes in each of the eight U.S. climate zones.

 

“This is the first time that the nation’s foremost home builders—both large and small—have joined forces with efficiency advocacy organizations in support of stronger building energy codes,” said David Goldstein, co-director of NRDC’s Energy Program. “This shows that builders are responding to what new homebuyers want – houses that use less energy while keeping their occupants comfortable and saving them money on utility bills.”

Under the agreement, builders who select the Energy Rating Index option would meet specific mandatory envelope and hot water (such as pipe insulation) requirements, but have the flexibility to achieve the target ERI by the most cost-effective means available. One of the most common examples of an energy rating index is the Home Energy Rating System (HERS) administered by the Residential Energy Services Network. Over the past three years, “Certified Home Energy Raters” have used the index to estimate energy consumption of well over one-third of the new homes built. LBA reports this type of approach would add only $1,300 to the cost of a typical new home compared to $3,000 for meeting the current prescriptive standard.

If the ICC adopts the code change proposal (RE188) as part of the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC), the HERS Index system could be used to assess compliance. The updated code would save utility customers an estimated $300 annually for a typical new house compared to the 2012 IECC, which has been adopted in only a few jurisdictions, or $850 compared to the widely used 2006 IECC.

“This would be a win-win for both builders and the people who buy new homes,” said Ryan Meres, IMT’s Code Compliance Specialist. “By using this simpler, consumer-friendly rating system, a homebuyer can understand the efficiency of the house and compare House A to House B. Meanwhile, this also would give builders more flexibility in meeting market demand for more energy-efficient living.”

For more information, see David Goldstein’s blog  or download the fact sheet.

I have written some comments in a subsequent post on the Blog, you can read here!

Some Results from Energy Improvements

When doing a Home Energy Audit, I always tell people that what I find is not good or bad. I tell them that what I can recommend for improvement depends on  the cost of their Utility Bills.

If you have a water leak, we all know that paying the price to a plumber to fix it, will cost us when the plumber comes. We also know if we don’t fix it, we can pay the water company that amount over 1 or 2 or 6 months. How long depends on the amount of the leak and the cost from the Utility for your water. And then we still have to pay the plumber. so we make a choice.

Blowing insulation into the walls!

Blowing insulation into the walls!

Wendy stuffing insulation into the hopper!

Wendy stuffing insulation into the hopper!

Some choices are easy, for improving the efficiency of a home.  Most homes with a tank type hot water heater inside the home, in a balanced or cooling climate (south of the Kansas / Oklahoma border) will benefit from installing a water heater insulating blanket.  They cost about $25.00 and typical savings just north of the above line can run from 6 – 8 dollars per year. So at $6 bucks a year, the blanket pays for itself in about 4 years. And most people can afford $25.00.

Other choices are somewhat tougher.  Instead of $25.00 to invest in the improvement, cost can run $2,000 to insulate a basement.  If you spend time down there, you know it is a little colder in both the winter (brrr) and the summer (nice), then upstairs.  Again, using some Wichita area numbers a homeowner could save in the area of $350 per year. Each house is different, so I am using some averages from various audits. If you apply this  savings over 6 years, the insulation is paid for and you still save the money. The hitch? It is harder to come up with $2,000 instead of $25.00.

In 2011, I had an Energy Efficiency Project approved under the Efficiency Kansas Program. They loaned some cost, I paid some costs and we added some (a bunch) of insulation, air sealing to cut the infiltration, replaced a 18 year old furnace and air conditioner. I also added an Energy Recovery Ventilator.

Wade in the attic! Fixing a dropped soffit in the kitchen! You can see the 3:12 pitch on my roof.

Wade in the attic! Fixing a dropped soffit in the kitchen! You can see the 3:12 pitch on my roof.

My payment over the 15 year loan is 870 per year, due monthly on my Utility Bill.  So the question is, how did I do with saving some money?  I have been tracking my Natural Gas and Electric billings, with numbers going back to 2009. When I changed HVAC systems, I went to an electric Heat Pump with a gas furnace for back up or emergency heat. As a result, my gas bill dropped and the electric bill, which includes the loan repayment amount is higher than I can remember.

To account for the change, I had to do something with the natural gas, billed in MCF (1,000 cubic feet) and the electricity, billed in KWH (kilowatt-hours).  I decided to convert the gas usage to KWH for ease in comparing before and after.  I also wanted to be able to compare usage against the weather.  Some summers are hotter than others and some winters are warmer then others.

The National Weather Service tracks our weather very well.  You can get an F-6 Report from most airports around the country. In Wichita, we have a choice of 3.  There is Mid-Continent, the primary commercial airport; there is Jabara Airport, a smaller facility that specializes in private airplanes.  And we have McConnell AFB.  All have weather observations and reporting.

The F6 NOAA Report for March, 2011 at ICT. The 2 columns between the red lines show the HDD and CDD.

The F6 NOAA Report for March, 2011 at ICT. The 2 columns between the red lines show the HDD and CDD.

How did I compare the before and after?   Excel works great for prototyping number crunching and charting the results.  I collected my data on usage, cost and Degree Days from the Weather Service.  I built two charts. First one covering January 2009 through present. After looking at this chart, I built another showing January 2011 through present.

The charts show three (3) lines. The Blue Line represents Heating Intensity by month.  I took Heating Degree days, multiplying by 5.  The Red Line represents Cooling Intensity by month. I took Cooling Degree days, multiplying by 3.5.  The Green line represents Energy, show in KWH.  I converted my gas usage to KWH by ” MCF x 293 “. Then I added the KWH from Electric and Gas to chart the Green Line.4 years

2009              2010                     2011                  2012                 2013

If you look at the top peaks of the Blue Line – you see the cold months. Imagine a level line averaging those tops. Somewhere between 4000 and 5000 on the Y-Axis. Look at the Red Line Peaks – you see the hot months. Imagine a level line on the Average of those peaks, just a little over the 2000 on the Y-Axis.

Now look at the Green Line, it goes up in the winter, and summer, down in the spring and the fall. This line doesn’t really run level on the peaks. If you pick about 6500 on the Y Axis in 2009 and 2500 in 2013, the line slopes down.  The Red vertical line shows when the improvements were made. This chart shows 3 years prior to the date of improvements and 1 year after.

The Chart below just shows one year before and 1 year after.  So the horizontal spreads out a little. I think the point is made in either chart.  The improvements require less energy to be purchased.

How much less in dollars, instead of Energy Usage? I’m saving my 870 annual repayment amount plus enough to repay myself over 15 years for what I kicked in.  And a little extra.

2 years

2011                                    2012                                   2013

Some one will ask why did I adjust the HDD and CDD numbers.  I did it to match the scales on the charts.  I first set it up with direct numbers. When you looked at the chart you could not make out any significant ups or downs to compare. So I reworked the numbers with multipliers, to make the charted numbers line up better.

In September, 2011 the chart shows 155 HDD, 591 CDD, the energy usage in KWH is 2261.  In September, 2012 the chart shows 0 HDD, 960 CDD with 1217 KWH used. Using the same Y-axis scale required some changes. So I used a multiplier to move from direct Degree Days for Heating and Cooling to an intensity measure for heating and cooling.

Thanks for following along.  I will make another post with more of this story.

Build Your Own Home Energy Audit

A comprehensive Home Energy Audit takes time and covers a number of areas. It provides lots of information and recommendations.  A homeowner may choose to limit the inspection to those items of their concern.

The energy efficiency of each home combines an analysis of the components of the home and how well they are installed.  Think of a bucket of water, the bucket is the walls and ceiling of your home. A pinhole in the bucket will drain the water from the bucket and the heat from your home!

A Home Energy Audit looks at the ability of each building component to resist the transfer of heat. The air tightness of each component is also reviewed.

This post covers a description of each part of a comprehensive Home Energy Audit.

Pricing, previously contained in this post, is posted separately.

Utility Analysis

The actual usage over the last 12 months of Electric and Gas is compared to the home size and evaluated. This requires information from the Utility Companies.

Infiltration Testing                 

(Multi-point Blower Door Testing with Thermal Imaging and Indoor Air Quality Analysis)

Everyone has felt a cold draft at one time or another. Since the air blew in and the house didn’t pop like an overfilled balloon, the air blew out somewhere else.  This test simulates a 20 MPH wind on all four sides of the home at the same time. It allows an actual measurement of leakage and it identifies the leaks. This allows a specific plan for the leaks in your home to be fixed.

The recommendations will include effective measures to improve indoor air quality, not just install what the salesman has in-stock. If you have de-humidifiers running this Testing is important.

Ceiling Evaluation:

The ceiling and attic areas are examined for insulation, ventilation and thermal bypasses. This is done from the outside of the home, the inside in all rooms and from the attic. It may involve remote camera usage. If Infiltration Testing is part of the package, information from the Thermal Imaging portions are applied to the ceiling Evaluation.

Foundation Wall Evaluation (below grade):        

In most homes a major source of heat loss is from the crawl space, the slab or the basement walls. There are generically referred to as the foundation of your home. Traditionally, builders have confused the thermodynamic principles involved, with hot air rising and heat loss, to falsely assume that basements cannot be kept warm.

Wall Evaluation (above grade):

Homes over twenty years old, or homes with a major insulation failure may benefit from a specific wall evaluation for walls above grade.  It is part of a comprehensive  energy audit. All wall evaluations are conducted with Non-Destructive-Test Methods to start. Depending on the home, the type of construction, access to various areas, further testing that involves minor holes being drilled will be discussed with and approved by the homeowner before the end of the evaluation.

The condition and energy efficiency of your exterior siding is done at this point.            

Equipment (furn. AC, hot water):                    (Includes safety checks on Gas Fired Equipment)

Your heating and cooling equipment is a large investment. What are the efficiency ratings on your existing equipment and what is available on the market? How does a home owner sort out fact from sales pitch.  This inspection includes safety testing for gas fired equipment. Furnace, Heat Pump, AC, Hybrid Heat Pump, are included.

Windows and Door Evaluation:           

Windows are advertised everywhere.  On the Radio, TV, the newspapers and other print media all carry large volumes of sales pitch for replacement windows. The FTC has fined some window companies for outlandish claims on energy savings.

Are your windows an energy problem? Can those energy problems be fixed or should the windows be replaced? What is the best for my home?  Low E, argon filled, double pane, triple pane? How does a double pane window save energy?  All these questions and more are answered. And you get the answers from someone that does not have a financial interest in your purchase or non-purchase of a product.

Windows and Doors are both holes in the wall.  From an energy loss standpoint there is not much difference. Doors are not as heavily advertised, but they are pushed after the salesman gets to quote your home.          

Computer Modeling and Reporting

The Comprehensive Home Energy Audit provides a complete energy usage model and reporting of problems, recommendations and solutions. Interactions between building components are considered in the computer model. You can go from the report to soliciting firm prices from a contractor or doing it yourself with this report. This reporting will qualify for applying for and Energy Improvement Mortgage if you are buying a home, or refinancing your current home.

If you choose various parts of the Home Energy Audit, written reports and recommendations will also be provided. These will all you can go from the report to soliciting firm prices from a contractor or doing it yourself with this report. The reports are limited to the selections made. Interactions between building components are not considered.

Duct Leakage Testing Not included in the comprehensive audit.

Some comfort and energy loss issues involve improperly installed ductwork. Testing is easy. Fixing these problems can vary in complexity depending on the home.      

Lighting and Appliances Not included in the comprehensive audit.

Incandescent, halogen, CFLs, LEDs, which is best for your home?  Not every fixture needs a high efficiency light! Should I get a new fridge or other appliance?  All these are part of the Lights and Appliances.

Bonus Room (over the garage, or in the attic) Included in the comprehensive audit.

Rooms placed over a garage or in the attic are a special case. They are part of a comprehensive audit. They can be an individual item, with infiltration testing, due to the unique construction problems with them.

For more information or to schedule a Home Energy Audit:  

V / T  316 641-5258  or  email:  info@efficientenergysavers.com

What is that I smell? Indoor Air Quality!

 

Improvement of Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) is of interest to many of the people that are pursuing an Energy Audit.  Over the last 40 years, many of the worst outdoor air pollutants have been controlled, reduced or eliminated as a problem.  New understanding of air pollution, new technology and new approaches have all had roles in these improvements.

As the improvement has been happening outside, people have begun to take a stronger look at what is happening inside their homes. Again new understanding of how a home works, new technology, and new approaches to handing indoor air have a role in improving IAQ.

In building a new home, following the Indoor Air Plus specifications, part of the Energy Star program, provides for long term Indoor Air Quality basics.  Following many of these specifications gives each homeowner a guideline to apply to improvements in an existing home.  It is easier and less expensive to build a home with these features. It is also possible to incorporate many of them into an existing home.

The list and discussion below provide information to homeowners about those improvements that are cost effective to implement and can be done over time or immediately. These are all improvements that will improve or maintain the indoor air quality and at the same time will improve the durability of the home.

 

Radon Control

Air Infiltration

Moisture Control

Pest Control

Heating and Air Conditioning System

  • Ducts are sealed in all accessible areas.
  • Pressure Balance Supply to each room and Return from each room. Use Jump or transfer ducts as needed to maintain balance.
  • Install a whole house type ventilation system to meet ASHRAE 62.2.2010 specifications.
  •  Spot exhaust fans in bathrooms, kitchen, laundry, dryer, central vacuum systems are exhausted to the outside, not into the area between floors or the attic. Use the specifications of ASHRAE 62.2.2010 here as well.
  • Adjust HVAC to maximize dehumidification in the summer.
  • Do not run HVAC blower on ‘On’ or circulate; use the Auto setting.

Combustion Pollutant Sources

  • Change furnace to sealed combustion unit
  • Vent Fireplaces outside and have them checked to verify they meet emission standards.
  • Install a Carbon Monoxide Alarm in each sleeping zone and in any room with a standard gas hot water heater or gas range.
  • Consider changing conventional atmospherically drafted hot water heater to electric or Tankless Demand with sealed combustion.

The Attached Garage

  • Air seal all common walls and ceilings in the garage. Maintain the air barrier by repairing holes, cracks in the drywall.
  • Install an automatic door closer on any doors into the home, from the garage.  A spring loaded hinge will meet this item. Do not prop the door to the garage open or use this opening to bring fresh air into the home during spring or fall.
  • Consider installing a ventilation fan to the outside, rated at 70 cfm in continuous use. Provide make up air source with this improvement.

Materials used in any Future Remodels

  • Certified low-formaldehyde pressed wood materials (plywood, OSB, MDF, cabinetry.
  • Certified low-VAC or no-VOC interior paints and finishes used.
  • Carpet, adhesives, and cushion quality for CRI Green Label Plus or Green Label testing Program

Air Filtration

The last step in any Indoor Air Quality program is filtering the air.

Most people start with this step.  It is really the last step.  If you keep stuff from getting in, you don’t need to filter it out.  Somewhat like closing the barn door after the cow is gone.

Duct Cleaning Services

Due to the varied construction of heating and air ducts, the heavily advertised duct cleaning service presents unique problems. The use of panned body cavities within walls and floors means ducts are not smooth inside. Flex Duct with increased friction losses, possible tight bends and up and down runs also creates issues.  The EPA advice is without compelling visual evidence of an extreme problem, duct cleaning is not advised. You may view the entire EPA Web Page http://epa.gov/iaq/pubs/airduct.html

Where Do I Start?

Get some Professional Advice.  This should involve a complete review of your home. It can be done by someone that is selling a service.  The assessment can be done by someone that doesn’t not have a financial interest in a product or service that may be recommended after the assessment. It is your home, it is your choice!

Efficient Energy Savers can do this assessment. It can be done stand alone, or with a comprehensive Home Energy Audit.  Call or e-mail for more information.

A Cold and Frosty Morning: What might an Energy Auditor Do?

Energy Auditing uses observation and science to determine what is happening in a home related to Energy Usage.  Necessary tools are a good flashlight, a blower door, and some way to record the observations for later analysis.

Optional tools, well – Energy Auditors can be come “Tool Junkies”.  Digital Dual Channel Thermometers, Spot Radiometers, Infrared Cameras, Computers, Software, Digital Cameras, Smart Phones, iPads, you name it, an Energy Auditor could probably find a use for it.  Then along comes a Cold and Frosty Morning and you are driving to your next audit. How do you make the most of your drive?

You could look at the roof of various homes as you drive.  On a couple of recent morning drives, I was doing just that. I stopped and shot a few pictures of different homes.  All of these homes were built between 1960 and 2000.  So here they are with comments. I have cropped the images to show just the roof, in most cases this will allow the home to remain one of many.

I have not audited any of these houses, and have only been inside two of them.

 

This frosty roof shows no frost along the roof line, directly above the exterior wall.  Note how it turns the corner on the hip of the roof.  I have outlined interesting points.   The vertical bar marks the point of the electric service, note the service line.  The lack of frost directly above this area is telling.

 

The issue here is that heat is being lost into the wall, and then through the top plate into the attic and then out the roof.  If you look at the area where the electrical service enters from inside the attic, you will find some type of holes in the top plate.  Perhaps a larger hole then necessary to allow the electric wiring.  A little caulk could go along way here.

 

 

Again the top plate of the exterior wall shows leakage.  Also in this image, an interior wall shows leakage in the upper roof area.

Heat loss occurs in interior and exterior walls.  Just caulking the outside of your home is not the best bang for you effort in sealing air leakage

This is interesting.  Without knowing the inside plan of the upper floor I am uncertain about the cause.  I would look for an attic access hatch, a furnace located in the attic, or perhaps some type of missing insulation along with a unique floor plan.

This picture shows the heavier frost over the eves of the home and less frost over the entire attic.

I would expect to find little insulation in this home, and what is there would be deteriorated in terms of effectiveness.  I would expect to find insulation moved or non-existent in several places.  I would also not be surprised to record a high leakage result from the blower door test.

Another picture of the top plate in an exterior wall.

 

This is an infrared image of the home with Frost pattern above.  I took this image at a different time then the exterior picture.  Both images are as is, no Blower Door going to exaggerate the air movement. It was also taken in the summer, so the heat coming in from the top plate leakage matches the heat escaping in the Frost Image.

Preliminary Conclusions:

Are these pictures definitive?  No, like most items on an Energy Audit, you need to look at several things to make a firm determination. Picture two is an interior wall, my knowledge of the homes interior, assists with this determination, even though I haven’t audited the home.

These are not necessarily a single look.  At least three of the homes, I have different pictures of different frost patterns.  What might make the difference?

  • Outside temperature and dew point differences.
  • Inside temperature differences.
  • Weather conditions; calm with little wind VS a steady wind of 20 mph or more during the 6 hours before and during the frost buildup.
  • Exposure:  These images have a western, or northern exposure. There may be differences.

What if I look at my house and do not see a pattern?  Look on another day, preferably several days.  The different conditions, may present different patterns.

Does a pattern like this cost me a lot of money?  Perhaps yes!  Perhaps no!  It depends.  To get more details get your Home Energy Audit. Each home is as unique as each person is.

Images like these only paint a picture.  We cannot determine how good or bad the heat loss is from the picture.  It provides a place to look, or not look.

If you take a picture of your Frost Pattern, upload it and put the link in a comment.  Let’s see what readers come up with.

Here are a few more with minimal comments.

 

Neat image with the Geese flying over.

This is a  most interesting pattern.  I have no idea what is causing this pattern. I would look for high air leakage, patterns on the ceiling with the IR during the Blower Door testing, and it would be interesting to look around the attic in this house.

 

 

The Unglamorous Conservationist

This article is a Guest Posting. I read this yesterday and thought it was very timely and appropriate with our current heat wave!

Originally Published: August 13, 2010 by kathrynkfletcher

Going green is trendy. Everyone is doing it. ‘Green collared’ jobs are the way of the future. Even oil companies are spending millions to convince us that they are green at heart. So we should all jump on the bandwagon, right?

Right.

But Scott’s post last Friday (Pruis vs. Home Energy Retrofit) brings to light an important issue – the best ways to go green are not necessarily the sexiest ways. Sure it is cool to drive around in a shiny, sleek new hybrid vehicle, but if you haven’t done the basics around your house it just doesn’t make sense. Which brings me to the unfortunate paradox when it comes to energy and water efficiency…

Even though it is fashionable to be environmentally friendly, some of the friendliest things you can do for the environment aren’t fashionable.

You can’t show off the new insulation in your attic to your friends, and I’m guessing that your neighbors aren’t going to find your on-demand water heater a particularly fascinating topic of conversation. Unfortunately, unplugging electrical devices when they’re not in use isn’t going to help your public image one iota, but all of these examples are very green… unglamorous, but green.

But there is an up side to energy efficiency that flies under the social radar … $ in your pocket, and I’ve never heard anyone argue that money isn’t sexy!

Dr. Kathryn Fletcher is with GreenHomes America [http://greenhomesamerica.com], a leading home energy retrofit company.

Energy Mortgages Part IV

Q: What training is required for certification as a HERS Rater?

A: The written standards are available on the RESNET website. Training includes principals of thermodynamics; evaluation of purchased energy amounts and usage; evaluation of building components such as walls, ceilings, roof, floors, fenestrations (doors, windows, skylights), crawl space and basements, ventilation standards, HVAC equipment efficiency determinations, and other types of building science. Diagnostic Testing includes Air Pressure Testing of the building using a Blower Door, and pressure testing of ductwork using a duct fan.

Q: Are there other National Organizations that can offer the type of HERS Rating required by Lenders?

A: RESNET is the national organization for certifying a standardized HERS Rating accepted by the Home Mortgage Industry, the IRS, the DOE and the EPA.

Representatives from the National Association of State Energy Offices and the Home Mortgage Industry formed RESNET in 1995 to standardize energy measurements and energy improvements to homes. Prior efforts had resulted in varied programs in some states and not others, and some municipalities.

Q: How is an improvement to a home calculated by the software as a cost effective improvement?

A: The software compares the projected cost of the improvement to the calculated annual cost savings. If the cost of installation and materials result in a favorable rate of savings in energy cost, the improvement is generally recommended. For example, the cost of $2,000.00 to insulate the walls of a 1960 era home and add insulation to the attic resulting in R-13 in the walls and R-50 in the attic could show an $800.00 savings annually. This shows a payback of the improvement in 30 months. Many simple improvements such as insulation, shell sealing, installation or replacement of weather stripping can show immediate results. After calculating these changes, it may become cost effective to replace the HVAC equipment with newer more efficient models that are correctly sized for the improved house.