Category Archives: Education

Quality Installation and Maintenance of HVAC Equipment

The news this month has multiple stories about Heating and Air Companies being very busy with units not cooling or not cooling enough.Screen Shot 2016-06-24 at 8.49.56 AM Driving around town, I see most of these contractors have a sign out front looking for help. The wait time is up to two weeks.  In the 7 homes I’ve been in this week.  One had no working AC, one home was on it’s last legs, and two other homeowners were very concerned. For the 1st time in 7 years, I’m getting calls from my website asking if I can fix their AC unit.

This morning I found a report on HVAC Problems, Problem Identification and Repair.  I have scanned this 27 page report and these are the things that jumped out.

Background:  California has some of the toughest energy requirements for buildings, both new and remodeling of existing buildings. These is a direct result of the problems they had 15 years ago, with not enough electricity.  They resulted to black outs, (Utilitys were allowed to shut off electricity to various geographic areas).  and brown outs, (Utilities were allowed to provide only part of the electricity needed to a geographic area).  Both are not good.

These energy codes are generally referred to as Title 24.  A large part of the work in California the last few years has been testing and measuring how well the requirements are being met.  This report is just one small piece of that process.

Title 24 refers to the problems, their identification and repair as “Fault Detection and Diagnosis” or “FDD”

Screen Shot 2016-06-24 at 8.51.18 AM

The Report was working on the answers to these questions

  • Is FDD worth the investment, and what is the savings potential?
  • How effective are available FDD methods and what do they cost to implement?
  • What training is needed for effective FDD and is it being provided?
  • Are codes and standards working?
  • What are the major gaps and how can they be addressed?

This particular session and reporting was limited to:

 

  • System Types–new and existing residential only
    • Air conditioners
    • Heat pumps
    • Furnaces and air handlers
  • Fault Types
    • Low airflow
    • Refrigerant system charge, restrictions, and contaminants
    • Mechanical and electrical faults and faulty installation
  • Repair vs. Replacement Issues
    • Cost-effectiveness of FDD
    • Replacement refrigerants for R-22
  • Human Factors
    • Training and quality of maintenance
    • Homeowner knowledge and expectations.

The reporting included tests applied with standard AHRI methods. The tests were designed to determine the impacts on efficiency and capacity of a variety of conditions, including:

  • Airflow of 250 cfm/ton reduced energy efficiency ratio (EER) by 12% and has the potential to produce a false overcharge diagnostic due to freezing of the coil (the asterisk denotes an unofficial EER)
  • Liquid line restrictions (e.g. due to clogged filter-dryer or metering devices) reduced EER by 30% to 36% for non-TXV and TXV systems respectively
  • Only 0.3% Nitrogen in the refrigerant reduced the EER  by 18% with no TXV and 12% for the TXV-equipped system

Discussion pointed out that California Title 24 charge verification methods, which only measure superheat (for non-TXV) and sub-cooling (for TXV) systems, and ACCA Standard 4, for which only 3% of the procedures are related to energy performance. Also covered were  how improperly maintained vacuum pumps, test instrument error, and poor service practices such as use of rules of thumb contribute to the introduction of non-condensables, improper charge, and other faults.

John Proctor, PE presented a case for making improvements to California’s Title 24 standards, John worked with a team to inspect a large number of recently built homes to identify HVAC installation and performance issues. He began his presentation by defining an “incremental effectiveness ratio” that divides benefits of maintenance by the incremental cost to diagnose, repair, and ensure quality, which is fundamental to the question of the value of HVAC service. He proceeded to show a series of graphs from his experience and other studies that illustrate the deviations from the ideal for airflow, charge, duct leakage and efficiency, and non-condensables, as well as the incidence of occurrence of these defects.

For example, his graphs show:

  • 50% reduction in airflow reduces EER by 25%.
  • A refrigerant charge that is 70% of the recommended charge reduces EER by about 55%.
  • Leaving Nitrogen in the line set and coil at 20 psig before charging with refrigerant reduces the sensible EER by about 45%.
  • From his 2003 survey, more than 60% of the houses checked failed on refrigerant charge, airflow, and duct leakage, and more than 95% failed overall.

Many of these issues result from a lack of training and a lack of follow up by supervisors.

They had some specific things that could be done by builders, HVAC Contractors and home owners to ensure these items do not get missed.

I will read the report in more detail and have further comments.

You may read the entire report.

This simple table will keep your home cool

Table 1 Jean-Sébastien Lagrange and Raphaël Ménard with their Zero Energy Furniture Climatic Table.

Consisting simply of a surface and legs, the table is one piece of furniture that has remained largely the same for thousands of years. But now, a French design duo has come up with a way to turn the humble table into a means of climate control that doesn’t use any electricity. Paris-based industrial designer Jean-Sébastien Lagrange teamed up with French engineer Raphaël Ménard to create the Zero Energy Furniture table, also known as the ZEF Climatic Table. The ZEF table looks like any other with a sleek design of a solid plank oak top and angled legs — but it could hold the secret to cutting energy costs by as much as 60%.

 

Table 2A close up of the ZEF table, which could cut energy needs by as much as 60%.

 

“We wanted to see if it was possible to address climate and energy issues on a furniture scale,” Lagrange told WIRED.

Beneath the oak table are a series of phase-changing materials (PCMs) placed between the wood and anodized aluminium bottom. The materials soften when the surrounding room reaches around 71 degrees, absorbing the excess heat, and then harden once the temperature dips back below 71 degrees, releasing the trapped heat with the help of the aluminium and causing a noticeable change in the room’s temperature.

Table SpongeThat means the table is essentially working like a “thermal sponge,” as Lagrange and Ménard put it, sucking up excess heat and then releasing it once the room becomes cool enough.

According to the inventors, the table has the potential to reduce heating needs by as much as 60% and cooling demands by as much as 30%, which could save a lot of money as well as energy.

It’s a feat of engineering that makes the most sense in homes that don’t have climate control.

In climates where the temperature can drastically swing from hot to cold in short spans of time, the ZEF Climatic Table is most useful. For example, if a room heats up on a sunny day and then the temperature drops at night, the ZEF table would make the climate in that room more consistent.

The ZEF table works best in rooms that undergo significant temperature changes frequently.

The Full Article on Business Insider Australia


 

This article is reprinted in part from the above digital source. It was originally from Wired and was brought to my attention by ASHRAE. Phase Change Materials have many applications in heating and cooling. One phase change material everyone uses is water.  At 32°F it changes from solid to liquid or liquid to solid. Of interest to energy efficiency are materials that act in this way around 70°F.

Be Proactive for a Green Appraisal

greenlightbulbWhen it comes to getting an accurate appraisal for a high-performance home, it’s easier and more practical to take the right steps up front than to try to get a low appraisal revised after the fact.

Appraisal expert Sandra Adromatis, a featured speaker at the High Performance Building Zone during the recent International Builders’ Show, offered advice for securing an accurate appraisal of a high-performance home.

First and most important is documentation, especially of features behind the walls and other items that aren’t immediately obvious.

A good place to start is by taking a close look at the Appraisal Institute’s Residential Green and Energy Efficient Addendum. This is particularly important if the home is built to a nationally recognized program like the ICC-700 National Green Building Standard or includes additional high-performance features that should be documented within the appraisal.

This article appeared on the NAHB Blog.

For the complete article

Ms. Adomatis also presented at the RESNET Conference after the IBS Show. I furnish the Energy portion of the AI Energy Efficient and Green Addendum for every new home rating I do for a builder.  If you would like to see one or see how it would help your building plans, give me a call.

Millennials Seek Smaller Homes, Energy Efficiency, Won’t Sacrifice Details

Originally Published on the NAHB Website
http://nahbnow.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/507029289.jpg

Laundry Room

The survey says: No laundry room = no sale.

 

As Millennials begin to enter the home buying market in larger numbers, homes will get a little smaller, laundry rooms will be essential, and home technology increasingly prevalent, said panelists during an International Builders’ Show press conference on home trends and Millennials’ home preferences last week.

NAHB Assistant VP of Research Rose Quint predicted that the growing numbers of first-time buyers will drive down home size in 2015. Three million new jobs were created in 2014, 700,000 more than the previous year “and the most since 1999,” Quint said. At the same time, regulators have reduced downpayment requirements for first-time buyers from 5% to 3% and home prices have seen only moderate growth.

“All these events lead me to believe that more people will come into the market, and as younger, first-time buyers, they will demand smaller, more affordable homes,” Quint said. “Builders will build whatever demand calls out for.”

Quint also unveiled the results of two surveys: one asking home builders what features they are most likely to include in a typical new home this year, and one asking Millennials what features are most likely to affect their home buying decisions.

Of the Top 10 features mentioned by home builders, four have to do with energy efficiency: Low-E windows, Energy Star-rated appliances and windows and programmable thermostats. The top features: master bedroom walk-in closets and a separate laundry room.

Least likely features include high-end outdoor kitchens with plumbing and appliances and two-story foyers and family rooms. “Consumers don’t like them anymore, so builders aren’t going to build them,” Quint said.

When NAHB asked Millennials what features fill their “most-wanted” shopping list, a separate laundry room was clearly on top, with 55% responding that they just wouldn’t buy a new home that didn’t have one.

Storage is also important, with linen closets, a walk-in pantry and garage storage making the Top 10 – along with Energy Star certifications. In fact, this group is willing to pay 2-3% more for energy efficiency as long as they can see a return on their power bills.

If they can’t quite afford that first home, respondents said they’d be happy to sacrifice extra finished space or drive a little farther to work, shops and schools, but are unwilling to compromise with less expensive materials.

A whopping 75% of this generation wants to live in single-family homes, and 66% prefer to live in the suburbs. Only 10% say they want to stay in the central city. Compared to older generations, Millennials are more likely to want to live downtown, but it’s still a small minority share, Quint said.

Panelist Jill Waage, editorial director for home content at Better Homes and Gardens, discussed Millennials’ emphasis on the importance of outdoor living and that generation’s seamless use of technology, and how those two trends play into their home buying and home renovation decisions.

Because they generally don’t have as much ready cash or free time as older home owners, Millennials seek less expensive, low-maintenance choices like a brightly painted front door, strings of garden lights and landscaping that needs less watering and mowing, like succulent plants and larger patios.

They’re also very comfortable with their smartphones and tablets, and increasingly seek ways to control their heating and air-conditioning and security and lighting as well as electronics like televisions and sound systems from their phones. “They want to use their brains for other things, not for remembering whether they adjusted the heat or closed the garage door,” Waage said.

Get more details about the NAHB survey in this post from Eye on the Economy.

I emphasized the two comments about Energy Efficient Features NAHB found.  If you would like help in addressing these in a cost effective manner for your buyers, Call The Energy Guy!

Passive House Work in Wichita

In the last two weeks, two national groups that certify construction for Passive House Standards conducted their annual conferences.  PHIUS was held in Portland, OR; and PHI was held in Maine. Locally, I have completed the first of 3 planned Blower Door tests for a passive concept home under construction; discussed the planned construction with another builder to start later this year; and discussed passive building concepts with another builder planning his first homes next year.

PassivhausDarmstadtKranichstein-300The Passive House concept started in Germany, with construction starting in 1990 on several homes. In German, it is Passiv Haus,  PHI for Passiv Haus Institute.  The standards followed by this concept require an attention to detail in design and construction of the thermal enclosure.  Historically referred to as the envelope, the thermal enclosure involves the exterior bottom, sides and top of the structure.

  • Higher than commonly used levels of insulating material,
  • windows meeting specific standards and very
  • Effective work on air sealing
  • Attention to the Solar Orientation of the home to maximize the use of solar heat in the winter

PHIThis results in an extremely low energy bill.  How low? In the Wichita area, this would translate to an $88 – $110 annual natural gas bill, instead of $500 – $900 bills that I routinely see on Home Energy Audits.

The passive term comes from the idea of using insulation and construction techniques to create a significant energy savings instead of relying on fancy machinery to create that savings. Dr. Wolfgang Feist of Dahrmstat, Germany founded the Passiv Haus Institut in 1996.

Smith HouseThe passive house concept arrived in the US in 2003.  Katrin Klingenberg, a licensed architect in Germany, She built a home meeting these standards, 2 hours south of Chicago.

 

Most countries have a local organization that trains and certifies homes and commercial buildings to the Passive Standard. Yes, passive concepts apply to buildings other than homes. These groups train people to apply and measure the standards. They also review the reports on specific buildings and accept or deny actual certification for a specific building.

PHIUSIn the US, this organization has been known as PHIUS.  Passive House Institute, US. Ms Klingenberg has been the leading light of this group, which was founded in 2007.  There are some things in each country that differ from the original German model of Passiv Haus.

The experience of the professionals working with PHIUS in the US has resulted in some changes to how the concept is applied in the US. For example, the metric units used in the German (and most others in the world) have been translated to the Imperial units used in the US. The collaborative nature of US business groups has been essential to moving the passive concept from being used by a relative few to becoming a market force in the US.

Because these adaptations by PHIUS to the US market, were not acceptable to the original PHI, a divide between the approaches has occurred in the US.  It is mostly technical, and both groups agree the concept is still primary.  Effective building resulting in low energy use.

Some claims have been made that these concepts are two expensive for the US market. The original Passive House in Illinois was built at a 2003 cost of $94/ sf.  That is very favorable with current US construction costs. Since additional people are using the concept and the resulting products that manufacturers are producing, the mass production will bring some drop in costs.

If you wish to read more about the two national conferences for both the PHI and the PHIUS organizations that just finished, you may use these articles.

The 9th annual North American Passive House Conference (PHIUS)

Report from the Passive House Conference in Maine

I will keep you updated on activity in this area about Passive House building activity, as it progresses.  Three projects is a great start.  I’m glad that builders are willing to try new concepts and that home buyers are willing to step up and buy these homes.

In the introduction of this post, I mentioned a house under construction with the Passive House concept. I conducted the first of 3 Blower Door Tests last week.  This test was after the framing and exterior sheathing was completed.  Insulation, plumbing, electrical and trades had not started.  The second test will be in a few weeks after these trades have done their initial work and put holes in the enclosure.  Electric wires, plumbing, HVAC and other necessary conveniences of our lives will be installed in passive concept homes. The third test will be done at the end of construction.

The PHI/PHIUS standard for Air Infiltration as measured by the Blower Door Test is 0.60 –  The current 2012 recommended code requirement for this is 3.0 — Wichita/Sedgwick County does not have an energy code in place, but the Kansas City area does. They enforce a 5.0 standard.  Typical homes built from 1980 and prior are in a range of 10 – 38 from my testing.

The goal of the builder on this passive concept home was to reach 1.5 on this first test. Then using the Infrared Camera to find areas to caulk, and fixing the penetrations mentioned above, have the next test come in lower.

Blower Door62This test, actually came in at 0.62 —  almost the standard.  Much better than the expected 1.5 .   While the blower door was running, the Infrared found some places that could be fixed.  Dan, the carpenter, was right there with a caulking gun.  We also found some leakage with biometrics. A back of your hand that is wet, will show you extremely small amounts of air movement.  Most builders like to use expanding foam to seal the actual window to the rough opening.  We found some of these foamed openings were still leaking. Again the caulking gun was a good answer.

 

What Happens to a Bowl?

My Wood Turning Album on Facebook says

‘Sometimes something besides sawdust and wood shavings comes out of my shop.’  A number of those items are bowls.  Big ones, little ones, most are turned with a use in mind. One of the questions I am asked is:  “What happens to a bowl?’  Here is one answer.

11 inch ElmThis bowl started life as part of an Elm Tree.  It was planted many years ago, perhaps it was not planted, and just landed there.  As the tree grew, the power lines got in the way and the branches were trimmed.  The tree provided shade to those that paused under it.  Shade to the houses, and a perch for many birds.  In  the summer of 2012 the Elm was not in the best shape.  Somewhat lop sided due to the need to protect the power lines, it was still impressive.  The main trunk was about 36 inches at ground level.  The tree branched out in many ways.  The houses near by were within the shade and within the fall of branches as the wind blew. The homeowners felt very thankful for the shade and their time with the tree. The time had come.

The arborist came out and found why so many branches were dropping with minor winds.   The tree was dying, from the inside out.  So it was cut back and finally cut down.  This is quite a process to watch, as guys climb up the tree with safety ropes and chain saws.  The smaller branches drop around the tree, then the larger high branches.  The rain of branches dropping stops from time to time.  The branches are cleared away and those worth recycling are cut up and stacked. Then the process repeats itself. Eventually, the tree was down and the large trunk was cut into manageable pieces.Elm

I was luck enough to pick up some of this wonderful tree.  I have turned a few items.  The half log this bowl came out of was placed on the lathe last summer. The tree was still alive when it was cut down. So I partially turned this one to help it dry out. Then it put it aside to see how it dried out.  This one did rather well.  No cracks or splits and not much warping.  Last winter, it went back on the lathe to turn down to the finished size.

I removed more waste and cleaned up the shape. Along the way, I found some evidence of worms and other pieces of the decay process the arborist saw that was killing the tree from the inside out.  Over Labor Day weekend the turning and sanding was completed. The bottom was labeled and an oil finish was applied.

Since this bowl is designed as a Popcorn Bowl, 11 inches across and 5 inches tall, an oil finish is perfect. The oil from popcorn will continue to renew the finish for years to come.  Some time last winter I posted an in progress picture of this bowl on the lathe to Twitter. I had a question regarding the price of a bowl like that.  I thought about it and responded that this bowl would be donated to a local charity for their silent auction fundraiser. Then I got an idea for increasing the value and thus boost the auction results.

The idea of boosting the Silent Auction results, causes a trip to our local Dillon’s Store. A few items from the shelf and some clear gift wrap from the knowledgeable staff at the Floral Center.  Here they are putting the finishing touches on the wrapping.

IMG_7954

This Popcorn Bowl is ready.  It is a heavy bowl, suitable for passing around the room during movie night or for a football game. The beads near the rim will help those buttery fingers hold on.  Any type of snack with some butter, oil or other similar snack will renew the finish.  Just wipe out with a dry cloth, ( or damp, if you wish.)

This little part of the big Elm tree, is now ready for a new chapter. The tree that took so many years to grow up, all the while sheltering the people and birds and other animals that paused for a few minutes or a few years, will continue to provide comfort and shelter to another family.

I took this Bowl to Wichita Habitat for Humanity this afternoon. It will be part of the Silent Auction at their annual Raise the Roof event this Saturday evening. Here are a couple of the wonderful staff at Wichita Habitat accepting the donation.

ErinIf you would like to attend their Raise The Roof Event, it is scheduled this coming Saturday evening, September, 13 at 5:00    You can read more about it, and buy your tickets at this link.

RaiseTheRoof

 

More Information and Registration for Raise the Roof.

A Healthy Home Part 1a: How Dry is Dry? –

rain

Water in a house, Good Thing, Bad Thing?  Some places like the sink you expect to find water. Other places like the floor, water is a problem. Builders work hard to build a home so water says where it belongs.

RoofLook at the way the roof is installed!  The shingles are layered from bottom to top. They are also lapped over each layer. So water, will drain down the roof and off.  If water gets up under a shingle, the roofing crew has done some other things like roofing felt, metal valleys and flashing to do the job.

Look at the water run off the overhang in the top picture.  When it rains most of the water hits the roof, the overhang changes how much strikes the wall. Matt Risinger, a home builder in Austin, TX, tweeted this graphic recently.

Overhang

Do you think Matt builds homes with short overhangs?

SidingThe layers on the roof are repeated for the same purpose for other areas of the house. They work the same way. Some are installed the same way, some are installed differently. Other areas of your home have a different experience with water.

Tyvek TopThe outer layer of a wall, the siding, like the shingles, are lapped. The next layer behind the lapped siding is usually known as house wrap. That’s the white covering you see on many new homes, before the siding is installed. Technically, the term for this is ‘Weather Resistant Barrier’ or WRB. Just as the roofing felt helps keep water outside on the roof, the WRB helps keep water outside on walls.

Just as the roofing felt, shingles, and siding are lapped; house wrap should also be lapped, each new layer draining onto the top of the layer below. The directions call for a 6 inch lap, and then tape. The tape is used on house wrap and not roofing felt, because it is a different material, cap nails should be used.

IMG_7672How does the home buyer know the house wrap is right? It passed a code inspection, didn’t it?  This image shows damaged house wrap. Is it taped and lapped correctly? Are the fasteners used according to the manufacturer’s directions.

Do these problems mean that house wrap is bad.  Certainly not!  House wrap is a great product when installed correctly.  It will do the job it is designed to do; act as a Weather Resistant Barrier. It will then, direct water back outside and not allow it into the wall.

DetailWindows and doors need an opening in the wall. These openings must be detailed correctly or water will enter. These details involve flashings, and tapes. How the window is made, with nailing flanges, with foldable nailing flanges or field installed nailing flanges must be considered. Here we see a tape used to seal the nailing flange to the house wrap.

Is house wrap the only type of WRB used?  No!  It is the most widely used in this area. The others will be covered in a future post.

Now if the roof and the wall properly shed water, and they guide any water that gets inside back out, we get to the ground. At this point the water should be directed away from the house.  Gutters and down spouts do a great job when the ground slopes away. Recommended slopes are 1/4 inch per foot for hard surfaces like concrete, and 1/2 inch per foot for other surfaces. Local codes may require more, or a builder preference may result in a larger grade.

damp_proofingThe basement or foundation walls should be damp-proofed on the outside. This is the black spray applied to the concrete. A tile drain system is installed around the exterior of the foundation and tied into a sump to be pumped out of the home.

 

If these or other equivalent measures are built into a new home, the builder is doing the job right. They are all in the building code. The issue is not what material, the issue is quality of workmanship.

This post is part of a series of posts on A Healthy Home.

 

 

 

Using One HVAC System for Two Areas

My first audit was triggered by the homeowner concerned that the upstairs was several degrees warmer than downstairs. Since we all have experienced Hot Air  goes up, it makes some sense.  In this case the difference was 15° F at 8:00 am, rising to 20° F by noon that August morning.  Yes, it was hot.

4 square craftsmanThere are a number of ways to help this out, for existing homes. Which one is best depends on the specific home, the existing setup and the homeowner.  For new homes, it usually falls to the HVAC guys to work out.

In a new 2 story home, it is common to see two HVAC units.  One in the basement for most of the home and one in the attic for the second floor.  Some builders, concerned with cost, or space considerations, will try a Zoned System.  You can also find Zoned Systems in single story homes, with the master suite on one zone and the rest of the home on another zone.

furnace bypass zoneTypically, the set up uses a bypass and several dampers to control the air.  The wisdom of this approach is that changing the air flow through the unit costs a lot of $$$$.

In the video below, John Proctor, goes through the measurements and calculations of using or not using a bypass and dampers to figure out exactly what is happening.  His conclusion:  The Bypass Damper set up costs 22% – 32% more.

This video is primarily written for HVAC contractors and others interested in the details and workings of air conditioning.  If all the numbers make your eyes glaze over, that is OK.  All you want is comfort, a Bypass dampened system may do that at a cost. It may have the cost and not do that.  So if you are considering a Zoned HVAC system,  tell your contractor —  ‘No Bypass Dampers’!  And refer them to this post.

A Tour of the Agco Plant in Hesston

Yesterday, I whet on a tour with the Wichita Chapter of APICS of the Agco Plant in Hesston, KS.  Located an hour north of Wichita, they manufacture farm machinery that is sold all over the world.  The plant originally made powered hay equipment. Here is one of their museum pieces SN 7  made in 1955 a wind rower, which cut and raked the hay for the baler. This combined two operations into one.Hesston Windrower

This one has been fully restored and they enter it in local parades.

APICS provides education and certification in resource allocation for industry. They work in Production and Inventory Management. It is always great to see professionals sharing and learning from one another.

The AGCO Tour was a great tour.  They had 3 guides and each group was about 10. They used a wireless system with each of us wearing a receiver to listen over the noise. I really appreciated that. Our tour guide had worked for AGCO for 47 years before retiring.  He now volunteers to return to conduct these tours. They give the tours regularly. They are expecting a group from Europe next week. Most of their tours are related to sales and service of their equipment.  When you have a plant with this level of expertise, it pays to give tours and put your best foot forward.

The plant has 8 buildings, covering 17 acres under roof.  The have 1,650 employees, including office, technical, engineering and production staff. Some areas work 3 shifts.  They manufacture Gleaner and Massey Ferguson Combines, large square and round balers, and other hay processing equipment.

Fordon Tractor with Windrower attached ca 1925Our guide emphasized that if it was made from metal, it was made here, on site. If it was made from rubber or plastic, it came elsewhere. The metal exceptions were fasteners such as nuts, bolts and screws and the engines for the machinery. The engines are made in an AGCO plant located in Finland.  Remember, their distribution is world wide, so this company makes machinery that goes all over.

The CNC and laser cutting processes, the robotic welders and the paint areas were all shown. The assembly areas and sub-assembly areas were shown as well.  It was fascinating to hear the obvious pride of our guide telling about what was made here and there, in this cell or that area.

I was pleasantly surprised to be shown as much of the plant as we were. It was all open and clean, accessible, and actually pleasant to walk through.  I have toured other plants over the years, small machine shops to large plants.  My last tour was a number of years ago.  The difference 20+ years, and the effect of professional management and leadership makes, is very striking.

Histoical PhotosAbove is a display of some historical photos of manufacturing Massey Ferguson implements 80-90 years ago.

Our guide emphasized the ISO 9000 quality control certification the plant had attained. This process, from the limited information provided, seems to be quite the thing.  We observed the areas reserved for parts that did not meet the engineering specifications.  There always seemed to be one or two part there, but never many. It demonstrated that those production staff, take their jobs seriously and are not shy about meeting their production and quality goals.  I would have wondered if I had not seen some parts being set aside.  No process works perfectly on every piece. Part of my job, as a HERS Rater, involves some quality control. It is nice to see people working, checking their work and sending some back to meet a specification.

The last stop on the tour was their education building. They conduct training on all aspects of maintenance and repair of the equipment manufactured at this plant and other AGCO plants. One of the things they do at this building, is to tear down machines that fail in use. Another part of their Quality Control.

Presentation APICS to ACCO

I understand their not wanting pictures taken within the plant. So, I was limited to taking a few of the group at the end.  The picture above is the APICS group presenting a plaque to 2 of our 3 guides in Thanks for the Tour.  Below is the group turning in their head sets and safety glasses.

APICS at AGCO

Question about Builders

google_adwordsGoogle Adwords is one way to promote a product or service.  I have used their approach in the past and currently have an ad campaign going. This campaign promotes New Home Buyers asking Builders ‘What is the HERS Score!’  The HERS Score is a transparent method the Builder can use to educate the buyers, appraisers and others essential to a success of the sales transaction.

I saw an interesting Google Referral today that is worth Blogging about.

The search term used was:  “Best HERS Rated Builder in Wichita”

The short answer is, there isn’t a best builder. That is because a HERS Rating is for a specific home, not for a builder.

images-1A HERS Rating looks at the features of a specific home and evaluates how well they are installed. The builder can specify a great furnace. The quality of the workmanship that is put into installing that furnace will effect the HERS Score.  Insulation is treated the same way.

The HERS Score shows the difference between two or more homes.  A new home buyer may be best served with a HERS Index in the low 90s.  A second new home buyer may be best served with a HERS Index in the upper 70s.

That reasoning, on the best Index Score, is best covered in another post.

HERS-scaleVAny builder can choose to build with either HERS Score above. Using one or the other does not make a builder better, it means the builder is meeting the needs of the buyer.

The HERS Score is a way of demonstrating transparency from the builder to the buyer to the realtor, the appraiser and others involved in the transaction.