Category Archives: Energy Star

Medical Study Shows Green Homes Decrease Illness

One of the benefits of buying and living in a green home has always been health related. Energy Efficient and sustainable builders have always taken care to keep water out and to seal up air leaks.  One of the effects is to lower your energy bills. Another is to improve the health of those living in the home.

No Flashing Window

The picture above is a window that was not flashed properly. Water was going into the wall. When you have water and wood together, you get mold.  Many new homes do not have this feature. Remember, there is no legal requirement to install insulation or other healthy features in a home in Wichita or Sedgwick County.

Now, US News and World Report’s Health Day column, written by Amy Norton covers a study in Boston.  She covered the research report in the American Journal of Public Health.

“Researchers found that children living in Boston’s newer, greener public housing had fewer asthma attacks, hospital visits and missed school days, compared with their peers in standard public housing. 

Adults, meanwhile, were less likely to report symptoms consistent with a condition called “sick building syndrome” — which include dizziness, headaches, nausea and eye irritation.”

Buying a home that has green features, such as Water Management Details, Air Sealing, and a Planned Fresh Air system is a big part of the Green Home that creates these benefits. You can find green homes, featuring these benefits, in and around Wichita. Some builder’s choose to have their homes certified to a Voluntary Standard such as Energy Star or Zero Energy Ready or or NAHB Green, or Eco Select.  A certified homes have these features verified by someone other than the builder.

So as the New Home market is growing in the Wichita Area, ask your builder about these features.  Don’t accept the answer that it is not needed, or this is what everyone else does. This is about the health of your family.

Read the entire article

 

‘Show Your Work’ Isn’t Just for Math Class Anymore

percent greenMy wife is a Math Teacher.  She always likes student’s papers that ‘show your work’! This NAHB Report says ‘Show Your Work’ also applies to building and selling Energy Efficient Homes.

An Early Look at Energy Efficiency and Contributory Value examined sales of homes in the greater Denver metropolitan area between January 2012 and April 2014 to determine the impact that energy efficiency has on the home buying process.

Ultimately, the authors concluded, “There is a current lack of researchable and quantifiable data … Until the data is consistently available and easy to find, it is likely that the residential appraiser’s ability to develop a credible opinion of value will be limited.

Among the observations/findings in the study:

  • The percentage of home sale listings citing “energy” increased in both local multiple listing services between 2006 and 2013, apparently indicating that such features are increasingly appealing to prospective buyers.
  • DadBabyESIn a very limited survey the authors conducted of home owners who purchased Energy Star-qualified homes, 96% indicated that if they were purchasing a home in the future, they would like the home to have an energy-efficiency rating so that they could compare it to other homes.
  • According to the authors: “Appraisers need third-party certified and verified energy-efficiency documentation.” Determining a home’s energy efficiency is “beyond the normal scope of work,” knowledge and experience of an appraiser.
  • Although the survey was not intended to estimate property values based on the presence of energy-efficient elements, in most of the case studies, the presence of energy-efficiency features added measurably to the value of the home. Several of the homes featured in the case studies were certified to the ICC 700 National Green Building Standard.
  • It was difficult, and sometimes impossible, for the study’s authors to separate the value of energy efficiency measures from other green features.

NAHB actively supports efforts to educate appraisal and realty professionals about the intrinsic value of home performance, and how certifications like the ICC 700 National Green Building Standard can help non-building professionals and their customers identify high performance homes and appreciate their benefits.

Full Report

Buying an Energy Efficient Home

HomePOHThe Annual Spring Parade of Homes is on the last week in the Wichita Metro Area.  There are some great homes out there. Lots of amenities to consider. Everyone has their own lifestyle and looks for a floor plan to fit. They all have their sense of taste and can look at the colors, finishes and visual effects.

POH_S15Every builder says they build an energy efficient home. Energy Efficiency is built in behind the walls.  It is usually not seen.  Energy Efficiency is about people and how they install the items that create the efficiency.  The specific items are less important then the way they are installed. Generally, the manufacturers install instructions must be followed.

Wichita – Sedgwick County has not adopted any code provisions for energy efficiency in new homes.  It may be legal to build a home with no insulation, but is that a wise decision? No one thinks so.  So how much is enough and is it installed correctly?  In this area we are reliant on the free enterprise approach energy efficiency in new homes.

Phoenix, AZ has an energy code, yet the free enterprise market based system has upped the game for buyers.  Here is a recent article in the Phoenix Newspaper about how a home buyer can see what is behind the walls.

Arizona-Republic-Features-of-ENERGY-STAR-HERS

The First Clothes Dryers to Earn the Energy Star Label Now Available Nationwide

ES DryerEnergy Star Press Release Date: 02/10/2015

Contact Information: Jennifer Colaizzi, colaizzi.jennifer@epa.gov, 202-564-7776, 202-564-4355

WASHINGTON –The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced today that Energy Star certified clothes dryers are now available nationwide through major retailers. At least 45 models of dryers earning the Energy Star label, including Whirlpool, Maytag, Kenmore, LG, and Safemate, are at least 20 percent more efficient and now available at prices comparable to standard dryers. 

“Dryers are one of the most common household appliances and the biggest energy users,” said U.S. EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy. “EPA’s Energy Star certified clothes dryers offer Americans an opportunity to save energy and do their part to combat climate change. By working with industry, we are bringing innovative technology to market that’s good for the planet.”

Clothes dryers consume more energy than any other appliance in the home, and 80 percent of American homes have dryers. But unlike clothes washers, which have seen a 70 percent drop in energy use since 1990, the energy efficiency of most dryers has not improved. If all residential clothes dryers sold in the U.S. were Energy Star certified, Americans could save $1.5 billion each year in utility costs and prevent greenhouse gas emissions equal to the electricity use from more than 1.3 million homes.

The efficiency specifications were developed with extensive input from manufacturers, retailers, the U.S. Department of Energy, and environmental groups. Manufacturers meet the specification requirements by incorporating advanced sensors that more effectively detect when clothes are dry and stop the dryer.

Energy Star certified dryers include gas, electric and compact models. The Energy Star label can also be found on dryers that feature new advanced heat pump technology and are 40 percent more efficient than conventional models. Heat pump dryers recapture the hot air used by the dryer and pump it back into the drum. By re-using most of the heat, a heat pump dryer is more efficient and avoids the need for ducts.
For the complete Press Release:

The Energy Guy Gets a New Ride …

EG 4

 

OK!  Why a new car?  200K miles on the old one maybe?  Then being able to carry most if not all the equipment I need in one trip?  A moving billboard?

Yes to all of those!  So I had a Party.  Our Derby Chamber of Commerce hosts a Business to Business time once a month from 8 – 9.  Coffee and stuff that is guaranteed to add to my waist line.  They do a Ribbon Cutting when you join.  So I had mine this morning.  Here is the crew that came out for the Ribbon Cutting.EG 5Look closely, those are wooden scissors. Ceremony! So here is the next one with real scissors.EG 2Lots of wonderful people here.  Did they all come for my Ribbon Cutting?  I’d like to think so. This month the sponsor was Nova Care of Derby.

I’d like to thank the Derby Chamber, Mark and his staff Tim and Lindsi for helping out with this party.  I’d also like to thank my Ang’s  –  I had two guests today from Wichita.  Angie Tejeda and Angee MacMurray.  I posted a blog post a few weeks ago about a Twitter Conversation with Angee, take the link. I wrote about Igloo’s and my future plans.  No, I’m not building an Igloo.

Jen and Rick Brown showed up also.  I teach Sunday School with them. Thank You, Jen for the fine photography here.  And Thank You to everyone that came out to my party.  I must also acknowledge the the great folks at Mighty Wraps in Wichita.  Justin and Lori were great to work with during the design and application of the wrap.

If you see my ride around town – please Wave!

A Healthy Home Part 3 — Well Ventilated

Fresh AirA Healthy Home is well ventilated.  Everyone knows fresh air is important. This should be easy.  Well ventilated in more than just bringing in fresh air. The concepts are certainly easy, the details on the other hand take some thought and planning.  A new home ventilation strategy is fairly straight forward to design and implement. An existing home needs the input from the occupants and good analysis to address the problems. An effective ventilation strategy should address these issues in either new or existing homes.

  • Remove humidity, odors,, or significant problems from specific areas.
  • Remove stale, musty or other objectionable air.
  • Allow the occupants to choose fresh air sources that can be filtered or treated in other ways
  • Allow the occupants to choose to open windows when outside weather is appropriate
  • Allow the occupants to operate a system that can provide the amount of fresh air, to the appropriate places, in adequate amounts when needed
  • Provide fresh air when the outside air creates potential problems, such as Ragweed season or when other allergens are active
  • Provide air movement within the home, without the use of the expensive blower on the furnace or heat pump.
  • Allow minimal use of heating or cooling equipment during the shoulder seasons, when temperature changes are minimal, while keeping the home comfortable.

Billings QuoteHow much fresh air is needed?  Going back to the 1890’s, the number has been pegged at 30 CFM (cubic feet per minute) per person. This number was validated in a number of different studies and with the public health authorities in larger cities, dealing with large apartment buildings and recurring respiratory diseases.  I was pointed to the quote at the left by Allison Bailles. he located the original book on Google Books, page 20.

Beginning in the 1930s, research into changes in building techniques began to show the optimal number was closer to 15 CFM per person.  Some of the changes in construction included the increased use of forced air heating, moving from balloon framing to platform framing, increasing square footage, and the use of insulation in walls and attics. The formula changes from time to time and everyone has an opinion on details. The common point remains, fresh air is needed in every house.

Part of the Ventilation is removing air with a problem. Where is that?  Humidity is found in rooms that use hot water and basements.  Showers, tubs and cooking are the large sources of humidity.  The smells from food preparation and cooking can be very mouthwatering.  When the meal is finished and the refrigerator is full, the lingering smells become odors.  The answer is some spot ventilation in these areas. If your basement has a humidity problem, you can tackle that with a fitted sump pump cover to contain the humidity, and work to eliminate any water seepage.

vent fanSpot ventilation is a window that opens and an exhaust fan. The size of these fans is part of the formula that is specific to each home. The features of the fan are common to all homes.  It must be quiet. Builder grade fans are noisy. Noise in fans is measured in ‘Sones’. The Sone is a linear measurement of noise, compared to the decibels used by OSHA and others which is an exponential measurement.  Linear is better for quiet sounds, and decibels is better for loud noises. Fans should be less than 3 sones, and preferably less than 1 sone.  Reasonably priced fans are available that rate a 0.3 sones. A 1 sone fan is very quiet.

UnknownFans are certified for air flow and noise levels by the Home Ventilation Institute. HVI certification is very common and includes both the Sone rating and CFM rating.  When installing a fan, you must consider the duct losses that will occur in meeting the required air flow.   The rates for bathroom air flow  are 50 CFM, and 100 CFM for a kitchen.  Do not expect to buy a 50 CFM fan for a bathroom and connect it to 6 or 8 feet of duct work, and obtain 50 CFM.  I have measured 30 CFM routinely in these set ups.

Most people understand that various parts of their body are just a part of the whole.  If you start some type of therapy, there may be a side effect. Physical Therapy starts and you end up with some sore muscles, aha!  Side Effect!  Start a therapy for cancer and your hair may fall out, aha! Side Effect!  Your home works the same way.  Each part is just part of the whole. Change something, aha! What is the side effect?

House-System-imgAll of the items in the list above are part of the whole. For an existing home, some specifics of that house may indicate concentration on one or another of those areas.  A home built in the 1920’s will benefit from a different approach then a house built in the 1980’s.

A new home should have the ventilation system that meets the general points above.  The natural ventilation provided when windows and doors are opened, or the mechanical ventilation system that allows filtered and perhaps treated fresh air brought in from specific places and in specific amounts, allow the occupants to make the system work as they need.

 

This post is part of a Series on A Healthy Home

 

 

Really Cool Bling for your Ceiling! or A Good Way to Keep Your Cool?

RickFanCeiling fans have been very popular over the years.  Rick’s American Grill has some.  Good solid, turning slow. Where is that?  Remember the line: “Play it again, Sam”.  Yes, the movie Casablanca!

 

They went out of style after the war. Now they are back.  I seem to remember installing my first one in the late 1980’s.  In the kitchen. They come with or without lights; mounted close to the ceiling, or on long poles hanging way down.  Different kinds of blades.

 

EE FanOne of the better inventions for ceiling fans was the box of dusting clothes that act like a dust magnet.  If you leave your fan turning for a while, it will collect a layer of dust on the leading edge of each blade and on the top.  I remember cleaning the one in the bedroom once. After that a certain lady in my life, made me cover the bed with an old sheet. These new dust clothes do a good job.  Just remember two things! (No three!)  First, turn off the fan before you dust it.  Second, watch your head and your hands. Third, Don’t ask me how I know the First and Second Rules.

So you find a fan that will be really cool bling on your ceiling. Here is one!  Now I have to convince a certain lady in my life that this Bling would be great for the next ceiling fan to replace. That is a Corsair F4U! BTW!

myfanThe question that came to me via Twitter a week ago, was ….  Should you turn them off when you leave the room?  Then all those questions that go along with the first one! Do they work? Do they save you money?  Do they keep you cooler? Quick Answer —  It Depends!  Better Answer, That’s why I’m writing this Blog Post –  Read On!

OscFanA fan moves air. It can be the fan in your furnace, or an oscillating fan, a box fan, a personal fan, or a ceiling fan.  Just like a breeze on a nice warm day.  Usually the breeze feels good and you feel a little better about things. If it is a real hot day, the breeze is a hot wind!  If it is a cold day, that wind is cold and all the weather folk on TV are spouting ‘Be careful! The windchill is ____ !’

 

So, the quick answer is ‘Yes, a ceiling fan will cool you down.’ Just like an oscillating fan! It is handier, out of the way, and usually has a switch on the wall. That switch on the wall will also turn out the lights that might be attached!  And there is the answer to the first question asked!  Should you turn out the fan when you leave the room?  Just like my mother told me about turning out the lights when you leave the room, the same advice goes for the ceiling fan.

doubleIf you are not in the room, leaving the lights on doesn’t do much for anybody!  If you are not in the room, leaving the ceiling fan on doesn’t do much for anybody!

Now, what about all those other questions that come along with the first one.  Like, Can a ceiling fan save you money?

The answer is Yes! If the use of the fan allows you to raise the room temperature for your air conditioning unit.  The ceiling fan uses some electricity, so you have to save some, or you have ceiling Bling that has an operating cost.

The answer is also Yes! If the use of the fan keeps you from lowering the room temperature for your air conditioning unit.  It saves the money you would have spent when you lowered the thermostat setting.

modWhy the double answer?  People want to be comfortable! When they are not comfortable, they do things that use energy to get comfortable.  Looking though pictures taken at summer events around 1900, I have seen many ladies, with a hand held fan. Sometimes it is a piece of paper folded once.  That fan uses muscle energy. Our mechanical fans use electricity.

If you avoid turning the ac temperature down or you can actually turn it up because you use a fan, then you will save money. If you add the fan turning and turn the thermostat lower, you may be opting for bling on the ceiling.  That’s OK!  It is your ceiling.

ES_PartnerWhen you are buying a new Ceiling Fan, look for the Energy Star Label.  Fans are rated by the cubic feet of air they move per watt of power. That means the fan is in the best 20% of that class of fans for being energy efficient.

What Type of Hot Water Heater Do You Want?

Vent 3Most homes in this area have a gas fired natural draft hot water heater. They come complete with a draft diverter.  The purpose of the draft diverter is to send the exhaust gasses (containing Carbon Monoxide, Sulphur Dioxide etc) into the home if the chimney or flue doesn’t allow them to go up. Left is a picture of a properly installed heater with a draft diverter. Note the space between the tank and the flue. That is the design that allow the noxious gasses to back draft into the home.

Some have been replaced with a power vented unit, which like your new furnace has a fan that starts the air going up the flue before the burners light. Some have been replaced with a Tankless Gas Fired Hot water Heater. Some people choose to use an electric hot water heater.  Any of these are safer then the designed to fail builders grade low priced natural draft hot water heater.

Now General Electric has come out with a Heat Pump Hot Water Heater. In the past they have been great for warmer climates than Kansas. The improved models now available are great for Kansas and other cold weather areas.

GE is going after the New Construction Residential Market with these units.  Over 50% of the homes built in the US in 2013 were trusted by the builder to obtain a HERS rating.  The attached video (advertising) from GE shows how this unit will lower the HERS Scores and thus the home buyers energy bills.

GE and other companies are planning to meet an April 15, 2015 deadline for increased efficiency in Hot Water Heaters.  This is the start.

GeoSpring for Energy Efficient Homes

If you have questions,  leave a comment here.

 

 

 

What Types of Buildings Does a HERS Rater Work On?

I had an question last week.  ‘What types of homes can you put a HERS Rating on?”  A second question came along with it, “What types of buildings can you certify as Energy Star?”

These are great questions!  We usually think of homes as being a house in a subdivision or older neighborhood. It usually houses one family.  These are referred to in the trade as ‘Single Family Homes’.  Not everyone lives in one of these.  There are duplexes, four-plexes and all sorts of high rise apartment houses.  These are referred to as ‘Multi-Family Housing’. There are also buildings that have retail shops or other non-residential areas, with living units on the upper floors. These are referred to as ‘Mixed Occupancy’.

A HERS Rating is applied only to residential units. The ‘Home Energy Rating System’ was developed by the Residential Energy Network, commonly called RESNET. This non-profit organization provides guidelines for training, maintains the standards for the HERS Rating process, certifies the software used to IRS Standards, and finally enforces a Quality Assurance Program on all Ratings issued.

There is an organization that is developing a similar set up for commercial structures called COMNET.

The HERS Rating results in a score on the HERS Index. This score can be used by home buyers, realtors, appraisers, and many others in the property sale transaction. This rating is a private transaction usually between a HERS Rater and the property owner. Many HERS Index Scores are specifically used to market a property.  A HERS Rating may be completed for a new or an existing home. Lenders in some cases are requiring HERS Rating.

The HERS standard does not specify any specific products, methods or other requirements. The resulting Index Score reflects different levels of energy efficiency between rated homes.  A home with a higher score will use more energy than a home with a lower score. The index starts at Zero and goes up.  The highest score I have personally completed was 384.  Most existing homes score between 95 and 150.

A HERS Rating can be completed for single family or multi-family homes. The limitation applies to buildings that are 3 stores or less. In the trade these are referred to as ‘Low Rise Residential buildings.

Energy Star is a Brand that is promoted by the Federal Government since 1992.  It is designed to designate the top 20% of a product line with the most energy efficient features built in.  Every product line has standards for energy use. Specific tests are required on the different products.

Refrigerators are a great example.  A 25 cubic foot refrigerator is only compared to similar size units. A 10 cubic foot unit designed for a smaller apartment is not compared to larger units. there are a large number of refrigerator classes available.

Some products do not have an Energy Star qualifying standard.  Examples here would include clothes dryers and ranges, ovens and cook tops.

Energy Star Homes use a set of mandatory requirements that must be followed and a HERS Rating that must be earned. The requirements are detailed, covering 7 pages of checklists. They require specific energy related items, for example, continuous insulation. They also require things such as flashing of windows and doors for durability. It makes little sense to build an energy efficiency home that would allow water to enter the wall and destroy the insulation.

A maximum HERS Index score  is set, based on the size and number of bedrooms of a home.

Commercial buildings also qualify for an Energy Star Rating. Existing building qualify by reducing energy usage. This process, like most Energy Star certifications, is voluntary and as a HERS Rater and Thermographer, I am qualified to assist with, or to complete.

New commercial buildings qualify for Energy Star, by design and verification of the actual design being present in the completed building.  I can help with this also. Since most of these buildings have architects and other professional engineers involved in the planning, my role is more in the verification process. In the commercial area this process is called Building Commissioning. I would work primarily with the Thermal Enclosure and some of the HVAC issues.

You have an Energy Star New Home – How accurate are the Projections?

This study is of interest to all HVAC, Insulation Contractors. It is also important to Home Owners.  An Energy Audit makes recommendations and projects cost effectiveness based on a computer model of the Energy Use in each specific home.

How much can you count on those projections? Home Energy Usage depends on three things!

  • First:  The Weather!
  • Second: The Lifestyle of the Family in the Home!
  • Third: The construction of the Home!

Mother Nature has control of the weather! Lifestyle is the difference between having 3 High School Football Players in the family, or 3 High School Cheerleaders.  Energy use will be different. Then what happens to the use when those kids go off to college.

This study actually compares the projections from several hundreds of thousands of homes to their actual usage.  You can read the RESNET Summary. You can read the report itself. I have reprinted the Summary with the link to the Report below.

The original Summary can be read here.

My conclusions:

  • The correlation from projected usage to measured usage over time justifies the reliance on computer modeling using the software to guide your decisions on prioritizing improvements in energy efficiency to your existing home.
  • The correlation of projections for Energy Star New Homes to actual usage gives Builders, Contractors and Home Buyers the confidence to use an Energy Star New Home Certification for lowering the ongoing Operating Costs for Energy in a New Home Purchase.

John Nicholas

 

PROJECTIONS FROM HERS ACCURATE August 22nd, 2012

Posted by RESNET under RESNET News

Over the years, there have been discussions over how accurate are home energy ratings in predicting the energy use of rated homes. To enhance the discussion of the accuracy of home energy ratings’ energy use projections it would be good to review a study conducted and published by Advanced Energy on a large set of homes in Houston, Texas. The authors of the study were Michael Blasnik of M. Blasnik & Associates and Shaun Hassel and Benjamin Hannas of Advanced Energy. The objective of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency supported “Houston Energy Efficiency Study” was to assess the actual energy use of groups of homes built to different energy efficiency specifications in Metropolitan Houston – typical non-program (baseline) homes, ENERGY STAR® homes labeled by a Home Energy Rating and guaranteed performance homes.

More than 226,000 homes built from 2002 through 2007 by dozens of different production builders were included in this study. The large dataset also provided the opportunity to analyze how certain construction characteristics are related to actual energy usage. Data collected for this project included billing data for all new homes built in the CenterPoint utility service territory from 2002 through 2007, information from property assessor databases of four counties, detailed building characteristics for tens of thousands of ENERGY STAR homes from CenterPoint’s ENERGY STAR Homes tracking database, and detailed data files from energy raters including the home energy rating software tool, REM/Rate, input files and building shell and duct leakage test data. The study did not involve any direct data collection in the field but instead relied upon existing data sources.

This approach allowed the scope of the study to be much larger in terms of the number of homes analyzed but left some gaps in our understanding of some details, especially of baseline homes. The overall dataset includes hundreds of variables for 226,873 homes, including 114,035 potential baseline homes, 106,197 ENERGY STAR homes and 6,641 guaranteed performance homes.

Although consumption differences across groups of homes are smaller than advertised, ENERGY STAR homes perform very close to the predictions of the models on average, while baseline homes perform better than the reference homes defined by the HERS standard. ENERGY STAR uses a base case reference home defined as minimum local code specifications combined with the least efficient cooling, heating and hot water systems available, a leaky building envelope and a poor duct system. Using this yardstick to measure the performance of the ENERGY STAR houses in the study, they did quite well – showing a strong and fairly consistent relationship between actual and projected performance for both heating and cooling. Therefore the apparent lack of savings is attributable not to underperformance by the ENERGY STAR homes but to the fact that the baseline houses in Houston perform considerably better than the ENERGY STAR reference house.

The relationship between REM/Rate cooling load projections and actual electric usage was examined graphically and statistically for 10,258 homes with sufficient data. REM/Rate projected an average cooling load of 5,506 kWh/yr while the billing analysis estimated average cooling loads at 5,677 kWh/yr, about 3 percent higher – excellent overall agreement. Although the analysis found no systematic bias in the REM/rate cooling projections, there was a large amount of variability in the data. Findings revealed that the correlation was higher between house size and cooling load than between REM/Rate projected cooling load and actual usage. However, the study team feels confident in stating that when using current modeling software with energy-efficient new homes, there is a strong and fairly consistent relationship between actual and projected performance using REM/Rate for both heating and cooling. REM/Rate also estimated the average heating usage of program homes fairly well – only 4 percent lower than the measured loads.

To download the study click on Houston Energy Efficiency Study