Category Archives: HERS Rated Homes

‘Show Your Work’ Isn’t Just for Math Class Anymore

percent greenMy wife is a Math Teacher.  She always likes student’s papers that ‘show your work’! This NAHB Report says ‘Show Your Work’ also applies to building and selling Energy Efficient Homes.

An Early Look at Energy Efficiency and Contributory Value examined sales of homes in the greater Denver metropolitan area between January 2012 and April 2014 to determine the impact that energy efficiency has on the home buying process.

Ultimately, the authors concluded, “There is a current lack of researchable and quantifiable data … Until the data is consistently available and easy to find, it is likely that the residential appraiser’s ability to develop a credible opinion of value will be limited.

Among the observations/findings in the study:

  • The percentage of home sale listings citing “energy” increased in both local multiple listing services between 2006 and 2013, apparently indicating that such features are increasingly appealing to prospective buyers.
  • DadBabyESIn a very limited survey the authors conducted of home owners who purchased Energy Star-qualified homes, 96% indicated that if they were purchasing a home in the future, they would like the home to have an energy-efficiency rating so that they could compare it to other homes.
  • According to the authors: “Appraisers need third-party certified and verified energy-efficiency documentation.” Determining a home’s energy efficiency is “beyond the normal scope of work,” knowledge and experience of an appraiser.
  • Although the survey was not intended to estimate property values based on the presence of energy-efficient elements, in most of the case studies, the presence of energy-efficiency features added measurably to the value of the home. Several of the homes featured in the case studies were certified to the ICC 700 National Green Building Standard.
  • It was difficult, and sometimes impossible, for the study’s authors to separate the value of energy efficiency measures from other green features.

NAHB actively supports efforts to educate appraisal and realty professionals about the intrinsic value of home performance, and how certifications like the ICC 700 National Green Building Standard can help non-building professionals and their customers identify high performance homes and appreciate their benefits.

Full Report

Buying an Energy Efficient Home

HomePOHThe Annual Spring Parade of Homes is on the last week in the Wichita Metro Area.  There are some great homes out there. Lots of amenities to consider. Everyone has their own lifestyle and looks for a floor plan to fit. They all have their sense of taste and can look at the colors, finishes and visual effects.

POH_S15Every builder says they build an energy efficient home. Energy Efficiency is built in behind the walls.  It is usually not seen.  Energy Efficiency is about people and how they install the items that create the efficiency.  The specific items are less important then the way they are installed. Generally, the manufacturers install instructions must be followed.

Wichita – Sedgwick County has not adopted any code provisions for energy efficiency in new homes.  It may be legal to build a home with no insulation, but is that a wise decision? No one thinks so.  So how much is enough and is it installed correctly?  In this area we are reliant on the free enterprise approach energy efficiency in new homes.

Phoenix, AZ has an energy code, yet the free enterprise market based system has upped the game for buyers.  Here is a recent article in the Phoenix Newspaper about how a home buyer can see what is behind the walls.

Arizona-Republic-Features-of-ENERGY-STAR-HERS

Millennials Seek Smaller Homes, Energy Efficiency, Won’t Sacrifice Details

Originally Published on the NAHB Website
http://nahbnow.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/507029289.jpg

Laundry Room

The survey says: No laundry room = no sale.

 

As Millennials begin to enter the home buying market in larger numbers, homes will get a little smaller, laundry rooms will be essential, and home technology increasingly prevalent, said panelists during an International Builders’ Show press conference on home trends and Millennials’ home preferences last week.

NAHB Assistant VP of Research Rose Quint predicted that the growing numbers of first-time buyers will drive down home size in 2015. Three million new jobs were created in 2014, 700,000 more than the previous year “and the most since 1999,” Quint said. At the same time, regulators have reduced downpayment requirements for first-time buyers from 5% to 3% and home prices have seen only moderate growth.

“All these events lead me to believe that more people will come into the market, and as younger, first-time buyers, they will demand smaller, more affordable homes,” Quint said. “Builders will build whatever demand calls out for.”

Quint also unveiled the results of two surveys: one asking home builders what features they are most likely to include in a typical new home this year, and one asking Millennials what features are most likely to affect their home buying decisions.

Of the Top 10 features mentioned by home builders, four have to do with energy efficiency: Low-E windows, Energy Star-rated appliances and windows and programmable thermostats. The top features: master bedroom walk-in closets and a separate laundry room.

Least likely features include high-end outdoor kitchens with plumbing and appliances and two-story foyers and family rooms. “Consumers don’t like them anymore, so builders aren’t going to build them,” Quint said.

When NAHB asked Millennials what features fill their “most-wanted” shopping list, a separate laundry room was clearly on top, with 55% responding that they just wouldn’t buy a new home that didn’t have one.

Storage is also important, with linen closets, a walk-in pantry and garage storage making the Top 10 – along with Energy Star certifications. In fact, this group is willing to pay 2-3% more for energy efficiency as long as they can see a return on their power bills.

If they can’t quite afford that first home, respondents said they’d be happy to sacrifice extra finished space or drive a little farther to work, shops and schools, but are unwilling to compromise with less expensive materials.

A whopping 75% of this generation wants to live in single-family homes, and 66% prefer to live in the suburbs. Only 10% say they want to stay in the central city. Compared to older generations, Millennials are more likely to want to live downtown, but it’s still a small minority share, Quint said.

Panelist Jill Waage, editorial director for home content at Better Homes and Gardens, discussed Millennials’ emphasis on the importance of outdoor living and that generation’s seamless use of technology, and how those two trends play into their home buying and home renovation decisions.

Because they generally don’t have as much ready cash or free time as older home owners, Millennials seek less expensive, low-maintenance choices like a brightly painted front door, strings of garden lights and landscaping that needs less watering and mowing, like succulent plants and larger patios.

They’re also very comfortable with their smartphones and tablets, and increasingly seek ways to control their heating and air-conditioning and security and lighting as well as electronics like televisions and sound systems from their phones. “They want to use their brains for other things, not for remembering whether they adjusted the heat or closed the garage door,” Waage said.

Get more details about the NAHB survey in this post from Eye on the Economy.

I emphasized the two comments about Energy Efficient Features NAHB found.  If you would like help in addressing these in a cost effective manner for your buyers, Call The Energy Guy!

The Energy Guy Gets a New Ride …

EG 4

 

OK!  Why a new car?  200K miles on the old one maybe?  Then being able to carry most if not all the equipment I need in one trip?  A moving billboard?

Yes to all of those!  So I had a Party.  Our Derby Chamber of Commerce hosts a Business to Business time once a month from 8 – 9.  Coffee and stuff that is guaranteed to add to my waist line.  They do a Ribbon Cutting when you join.  So I had mine this morning.  Here is the crew that came out for the Ribbon Cutting.EG 5Look closely, those are wooden scissors. Ceremony! So here is the next one with real scissors.EG 2Lots of wonderful people here.  Did they all come for my Ribbon Cutting?  I’d like to think so. This month the sponsor was Nova Care of Derby.

I’d like to thank the Derby Chamber, Mark and his staff Tim and Lindsi for helping out with this party.  I’d also like to thank my Ang’s  –  I had two guests today from Wichita.  Angie Tejeda and Angee MacMurray.  I posted a blog post a few weeks ago about a Twitter Conversation with Angee, take the link. I wrote about Igloo’s and my future plans.  No, I’m not building an Igloo.

Jen and Rick Brown showed up also.  I teach Sunday School with them. Thank You, Jen for the fine photography here.  And Thank You to everyone that came out to my party.  I must also acknowledge the the great folks at Mighty Wraps in Wichita.  Justin and Lori were great to work with during the design and application of the wrap.

If you see my ride around town – please Wave!

Passive House Work in Wichita

In the last two weeks, two national groups that certify construction for Passive House Standards conducted their annual conferences.  PHIUS was held in Portland, OR; and PHI was held in Maine. Locally, I have completed the first of 3 planned Blower Door tests for a passive concept home under construction; discussed the planned construction with another builder to start later this year; and discussed passive building concepts with another builder planning his first homes next year.

PassivhausDarmstadtKranichstein-300The Passive House concept started in Germany, with construction starting in 1990 on several homes. In German, it is Passiv Haus,  PHI for Passiv Haus Institute.  The standards followed by this concept require an attention to detail in design and construction of the thermal enclosure.  Historically referred to as the envelope, the thermal enclosure involves the exterior bottom, sides and top of the structure.

  • Higher than commonly used levels of insulating material,
  • windows meeting specific standards and very
  • Effective work on air sealing
  • Attention to the Solar Orientation of the home to maximize the use of solar heat in the winter

PHIThis results in an extremely low energy bill.  How low? In the Wichita area, this would translate to an $88 – $110 annual natural gas bill, instead of $500 – $900 bills that I routinely see on Home Energy Audits.

The passive term comes from the idea of using insulation and construction techniques to create a significant energy savings instead of relying on fancy machinery to create that savings. Dr. Wolfgang Feist of Dahrmstat, Germany founded the Passiv Haus Institut in 1996.

Smith HouseThe passive house concept arrived in the US in 2003.  Katrin Klingenberg, a licensed architect in Germany, She built a home meeting these standards, 2 hours south of Chicago.

 

Most countries have a local organization that trains and certifies homes and commercial buildings to the Passive Standard. Yes, passive concepts apply to buildings other than homes. These groups train people to apply and measure the standards. They also review the reports on specific buildings and accept or deny actual certification for a specific building.

PHIUSIn the US, this organization has been known as PHIUS.  Passive House Institute, US. Ms Klingenberg has been the leading light of this group, which was founded in 2007.  There are some things in each country that differ from the original German model of Passiv Haus.

The experience of the professionals working with PHIUS in the US has resulted in some changes to how the concept is applied in the US. For example, the metric units used in the German (and most others in the world) have been translated to the Imperial units used in the US. The collaborative nature of US business groups has been essential to moving the passive concept from being used by a relative few to becoming a market force in the US.

Because these adaptations by PHIUS to the US market, were not acceptable to the original PHI, a divide between the approaches has occurred in the US.  It is mostly technical, and both groups agree the concept is still primary.  Effective building resulting in low energy use.

Some claims have been made that these concepts are two expensive for the US market. The original Passive House in Illinois was built at a 2003 cost of $94/ sf.  That is very favorable with current US construction costs. Since additional people are using the concept and the resulting products that manufacturers are producing, the mass production will bring some drop in costs.

If you wish to read more about the two national conferences for both the PHI and the PHIUS organizations that just finished, you may use these articles.

The 9th annual North American Passive House Conference (PHIUS)

Report from the Passive House Conference in Maine

I will keep you updated on activity in this area about Passive House building activity, as it progresses.  Three projects is a great start.  I’m glad that builders are willing to try new concepts and that home buyers are willing to step up and buy these homes.

In the introduction of this post, I mentioned a house under construction with the Passive House concept. I conducted the first of 3 Blower Door Tests last week.  This test was after the framing and exterior sheathing was completed.  Insulation, plumbing, electrical and trades had not started.  The second test will be in a few weeks after these trades have done their initial work and put holes in the enclosure.  Electric wires, plumbing, HVAC and other necessary conveniences of our lives will be installed in passive concept homes. The third test will be done at the end of construction.

The PHI/PHIUS standard for Air Infiltration as measured by the Blower Door Test is 0.60 –  The current 2012 recommended code requirement for this is 3.0 — Wichita/Sedgwick County does not have an energy code in place, but the Kansas City area does. They enforce a 5.0 standard.  Typical homes built from 1980 and prior are in a range of 10 – 38 from my testing.

The goal of the builder on this passive concept home was to reach 1.5 on this first test. Then using the Infrared Camera to find areas to caulk, and fixing the penetrations mentioned above, have the next test come in lower.

Blower Door62This test, actually came in at 0.62 —  almost the standard.  Much better than the expected 1.5 .   While the blower door was running, the Infrared found some places that could be fixed.  Dan, the carpenter, was right there with a caulking gun.  We also found some leakage with biometrics. A back of your hand that is wet, will show you extremely small amounts of air movement.  Most builders like to use expanding foam to seal the actual window to the rough opening.  We found some of these foamed openings were still leaking. Again the caulking gun was a good answer.

 

A Healthy House Part 1c: How Dry is Dry

rainIn Part 1a, we have looked at how your builder builds your home to keep water from the outside from damaging your home.  He used materials to shed the water and he lapped them over each other, from the roof peak and the shingles all the way down to the ground. And then directed the water away from the house, using gutters and sloping the landscape away from the house. Easy, quick and it looks nice.

In Part 1b, we looked at how your builder builds your home on the inside to keep water where you want it, and provide easy clean up when it does get out of the pipes, the sink, tub or shower.

BucketYou can think of this as bulk water.  You can see it, this is water that is usually measured in quarts or gallons, and it is responsible for 50 – 60 % of the water damage that occurs over time. The exact percentage depends on the source doing the figuring.  So why is there a Part 1c?   There is one remaining source of moisture in most homes.  Water Vapor.  Hard to see it, hard to measure it.  The damage water vapor causes is usually found to be very extensive.

If you have a roof leak, it usually ends up inside and you find it while it is relatively small. When it is fixed the damage is limited and fairly easy to fix.  Leaks from plumbing and over flowing sinks and tubs, is usually caught very fast. The surface is easy to clean up and many times contains the water.  Damage from these sources doesn’t really occur unless the water continues over time to get there.  It stays wet and is not allowed to dry out.

Flood type events are not really of concern here. When they happen, the homeowner is aware, his insurance may cover repairs and there are lots of contractors that will do the work. Generally, they have little to do with how the house was built.

teapotWater vapor is present in varying amounts in every home.  What is the relative humidity in the home?  40% – 25% – 65%?  That is water vapor in the air. We add to that from breathing, cooking, and hygiene activities, like showers and running hot water for various purposes.

How do we control this water vapor?

Spot ventilation.  This may be as simple as opening a window next to the stove where the pasta is boiling, or the tea pot is ready to pour. It may be using an exhaust fan over the stove to actually remove the water vapor from cooking out of the house. Same in the shower.

acWhen the heat and humidity arrive around here, in the summer, it is air-conditioning season. Most air conditioners will lower the temperature of the air and remove some of the humidity at the same time.  Somedays they do a great job, somedays the ac unit really has to work and it.  Occasionally, you will find a unit that makes the room fairly cold, and you just feel clammy.  Like you just walked in from 100° outside and you are wet all over. The trouble is, it doesn’t go away.  You keep feeling cold and clammy.

That is the first way that water vapor causes a problem with our homes, it makes us uncomfortable.

How does the water vapor move into the walls and attic to cause problems like the liquid or bulk water we looked at?  It has two ways to move.  Air Movement and Vapor Diffusion.

Vapor Diffusion involves moving a vapor, in this case water.  It involves temperature and pressure.  It also involves Math, lots of fancy math.  I know some math teachers that can run these numbers, and a couple of physicists here in Kansas.  I’m sure the characters on TV’s ‘Big Bang Theory’ could run the numbers.

Adding MachineThe good news is, we don’t have to run the numbers.  If you take a room in your home with the humidity at 40% and 70° –  you will find less than a gallon of actual water.  By the time all the numbers are done, the answer is:  Yes – Vapor Diffusion put some of that water vapor into the wall.  And we can test that the 7% moisture content of the drywall, studs and other parts of the wall, is now 7.5 or 8%.  Not much change.   If you have read much on this blog, you know I lower my blood pressure by turning wood, into bowls.  Anything less than 12% moisture content in wood is considered dry.

If the builder bought kiln dried lumber, and kept the rain off it, while the house was built, the wood is probably 8 – 9 % moisture content when the home is finished.  Kiln dried lumber is typically 6 – 8 %.  Moving from an enclosed type shed to the job site, wood will pick up a little moisture.

What about air movement and water vapor?  That is the one to take care of.  Uncontrolled air movement takes the water vapor right along with it. When that vapor comes in contact with a surface that is below the current dew point, it will condense and the liquid wets the material.  We know that energy savings is easy to obtain with air sealing.  So fixing the air leaks is good for stopping the water vapor from making our house wet also.   How much?  This graphic from the guys at Building Science Corporation shows how much.

Air_Vapor

This post is part of a series of posts on A Healthy Home.

A Healthy Home Part 1a: How Dry is Dry? –

rain

Water in a house, Good Thing, Bad Thing?  Some places like the sink you expect to find water. Other places like the floor, water is a problem. Builders work hard to build a home so water says where it belongs.

RoofLook at the way the roof is installed!  The shingles are layered from bottom to top. They are also lapped over each layer. So water, will drain down the roof and off.  If water gets up under a shingle, the roofing crew has done some other things like roofing felt, metal valleys and flashing to do the job.

Look at the water run off the overhang in the top picture.  When it rains most of the water hits the roof, the overhang changes how much strikes the wall. Matt Risinger, a home builder in Austin, TX, tweeted this graphic recently.

Overhang

Do you think Matt builds homes with short overhangs?

SidingThe layers on the roof are repeated for the same purpose for other areas of the house. They work the same way. Some are installed the same way, some are installed differently. Other areas of your home have a different experience with water.

Tyvek TopThe outer layer of a wall, the siding, like the shingles, are lapped. The next layer behind the lapped siding is usually known as house wrap. That’s the white covering you see on many new homes, before the siding is installed. Technically, the term for this is ‘Weather Resistant Barrier’ or WRB. Just as the roofing felt helps keep water outside on the roof, the WRB helps keep water outside on walls.

Just as the roofing felt, shingles, and siding are lapped; house wrap should also be lapped, each new layer draining onto the top of the layer below. The directions call for a 6 inch lap, and then tape. The tape is used on house wrap and not roofing felt, because it is a different material, cap nails should be used.

IMG_7672How does the home buyer know the house wrap is right? It passed a code inspection, didn’t it?  This image shows damaged house wrap. Is it taped and lapped correctly? Are the fasteners used according to the manufacturer’s directions.

Do these problems mean that house wrap is bad.  Certainly not!  House wrap is a great product when installed correctly.  It will do the job it is designed to do; act as a Weather Resistant Barrier. It will then, direct water back outside and not allow it into the wall.

DetailWindows and doors need an opening in the wall. These openings must be detailed correctly or water will enter. These details involve flashings, and tapes. How the window is made, with nailing flanges, with foldable nailing flanges or field installed nailing flanges must be considered. Here we see a tape used to seal the nailing flange to the house wrap.

Is house wrap the only type of WRB used?  No!  It is the most widely used in this area. The others will be covered in a future post.

Now if the roof and the wall properly shed water, and they guide any water that gets inside back out, we get to the ground. At this point the water should be directed away from the house.  Gutters and down spouts do a great job when the ground slopes away. Recommended slopes are 1/4 inch per foot for hard surfaces like concrete, and 1/2 inch per foot for other surfaces. Local codes may require more, or a builder preference may result in a larger grade.

damp_proofingThe basement or foundation walls should be damp-proofed on the outside. This is the black spray applied to the concrete. A tile drain system is installed around the exterior of the foundation and tied into a sump to be pumped out of the home.

 

If these or other equivalent measures are built into a new home, the builder is doing the job right. They are all in the building code. The issue is not what material, the issue is quality of workmanship.

This post is part of a series of posts on A Healthy Home.

 

 

 

A Healthy Home

Healthy HomeBuilding a new home, gives the homebuyer an opportunity to build in all the things they want. The floor plan, bedroom arrangement, windows are all important.

Also right up there is a house that is healthy. Everywhere you look, someone is pitching, this is healthy for you.  We have lots of buzz words for healthy.  Organic, whole grain, anti-oxidant, reduced fat, low sugar, wellness, all-natural are but a few. How do you make a house into a healthy home?  It starts with design and a few simple objectives.   Ideally, a healthy home is:

  • Dry
  • Clean
  • Well Ventilated
  • Combustion by-product free
  • Pest Free
  • Chemical Care
  • Comfortable
  • Safe

read beforeIt seems fairly simple.  We want a roof over our head to keep the elements out.  Hot or cold, rain or snow, we don’t want them in our home.  The dry home starts with a well constructed roof.  That keeps the weather related water like rain or snow out. Then the walls, and the foundation.

Clean may be obvious, or not. Well Ventilated and Combustion by-product free, along with pest free, no toxic chemicals, comfortable and safe seem also to be obvious.  There is a saying about the Devil being in the details.  It is certainly that way in building a home. So a few details on these topics that make up a Healthy Home are important.

I will be posting a series based on the Healthy Home. We will take a look at each of the points listed above and what they mean to the home owner.

Part Ia   How Dry is Dry       Bulk Water from Precipitation

Part 1b  How Dry is Dry       Bulk Water From other Sources

Part 1c  How Dry is Dry       Water Vapor

Part II    The Home Starts Out Clean

Part 3    Well Ventilated

Part 4     Free of Combustion Byproducts

Part 5     Pest Free

Part 6     Chemical Care

What Happens After You Finish Your Part of the house, and Then The House Is Finished?

images-2Modern home building takes a lot of people. Concrete, Carpentry, Heating and Air, Paint, Drywall, Insulation, Electrical, Plumbing and many others. These professionals work on the house at various times. Usually there is a sequence, the foundation is done before the framing, the roof is done before inside work gets very far. Toward the end, it can get somewhat hectic. Everyone is trying to finish. The deadline is looming. Painters, trim carpentry, flooring, plumbing, final electrical installations are all happening.

One of the last things is the final work on the Heating and Air Conditioning system. This cannot happen until after the electrician is finished, and if you have a gas furnace, the plumbing must be there. Some of the work by the HVAC contractor was completed before the drywall went up. The duct work was installed and the inside unit of the system was probably put in place and hooked up to the duct work.

If the home is built on a 120 – 150 day schedule, the initial work, rough-in, on the duct system would happen about 1/3 of the way. Then about 2/3 of the waywall_duct, the Heating and Air techs are back to install the thermostat, the outside unit, hook up the electric and finish the job.

Last week, I went out to complete a rating on a new home. I had completed some testing on the duct system at rough-in. I used a Duct Blaster unit and testing the duct system for Total Leakage. I got a great number. There is a professional standard, issued ACCA (Air Conditioning Contractors of America) for this test. It is based on the size of the amount of air flow pushed through the system by the fan; in this case it would have been about 1,200 cubic feet per minute.

The standard is 10% of system air flow or in this case 120 CFM. In a previous blog post, I discussed a test where the system leaked over 100% of system air flow. This is an important test, because it can be compared to the test done at rough in.ACCA_5

The rough in test for Total Duct Leakage came in at 4.8% of system air flow. This is a very good number and typical for this HVAC contractor. Now at final, the total leakage was 16%. Wow! What happened?

I cleaned up and left the house about 6:00 for the weekend. Sleeping on the ‘What Happened?’ seemed like a great idea. I did just that.

Tuesday, I went back to take another look. I would conduct some additional testing to see if the leak(s) could be isolated. I started by removing the grills that fan the air out through each room. That would be easy and fast. So, the first few looked pretty good. It was going fast, I kept going and half way through I found one that showed some problems. At the end 1/3 of these grills had a significant problem.

Duct BootAs you can see the vent in the wall, had the drywall cut too large for the duct. The openings ranged from a quarter inch to over an inch wide, all around the opening. The air instead of 100% leaving the duct system into the room, was being pushed back into the wall. The idea of the duct system is to put the hot or cooled/dehumidified air into the room where the people are. A grill can do a great job of sending the air into various parts of the room. A good grill for one place may be absolutely the wrong grill for another place. Grill manufacturers refer to this as ‘Throw’. If you have the wrong throw on your grill, you aren’t getting much comfort from your system.

The infrared image, below, shows the outside of a wall in the winter (It was 20° F that morning). The hot area below the window is from the grill directing the heat up the wall, not out into the room. I found this condition on an audit last winter and made two alternate recommendations for the home owner. The cost was less than $20.00 for either one. The problem was fixed the same day by the homeowner.exterior_wall

Back to fixing the leaks! I filled the cracks and gaps in the poorly cut openings, replaced the grills and then set up to re-test the duct system. The leakage was back to the original number.

This shows the value of testing your work. We work with Quality Control Systems in our everyday work life. As consumers we depend on the quality of the products we buy. We see how companies respond when they are faced with a quality issue. A number years ago a lot of Tylenol was recalled. A few bottles had been tampered with, not really the manufacturer’s fault. They recalled anyway and their customers were well served. In the past few years, several auto manufacturers have had some problems with their cars, and they did not promptly recall the cars to fix the problem.

qcApplying good quality control lets the customers and the management of a company know the level of quality. The company can make drugs, cars, or install your heating and air system. In this case the quality work done by the Heating and Air techs was changed by another person working on the job. Good quality control found the problem. The fix took only a few minutes. Now the home buyer will not experience the discomfort from a badly installed duct system. I will not get a call in a few years because the home owner is not comfortable. The heating and air techs will not have a lot of call backs.

My thanks today goes to the crew at Cooks Heating and Air in Wichita. They did the quality work and deserve the credit. I am lucky to be able to work with people like this.

Insulation In Your Walls

Poorly installed Batt Insulation

Poorly installed Batt Insulation

I’ve been working with a local builder on his insulation.  He decided to upgrade his standard package of insulation for the walls in his homes. Most homes in this area are built on site with 2×4 walls.  Insulation is almost always installed in the cavity between the studs. The insulation most commonly chosen is a Batt Type insulation.  I’ve seen some mineral wool batts installed during construction in Wichita, most batts are Fiberglass.  They come in white, pink, yellow and a brown.  Color is from the manufacturer, think advertising.

I’ve been working with a local builder on his insulation.  He decided to upgrade his standard package of insulation for the walls in his homes. Most homes in this area are built on site with 2×4 walls.  Insulation is almost always installed in the cavity between the studs. The insulation most commonly chosen is a Batt Type insulation.  I’ve seen some mineral wool batts installed during construction in Wichita, most batts are Fiberglass.  They come in white, pink, yellow and a brown.  Color is from the manufacturer, think advertising.

The concern with a batt type insulation is how it is put in the home. Workmanship is always an issue.  Is it installed to hold the price down?  Is it installed to maximize the Energy Efficiency. There is no code in the Wichita area requiring insulation.  Until two years ago, the recommended code for our climate was R-13 for walls located above the ground. In 2012, the recommendation changed, primarily due to increasing energy costs. The change was increased to R-20. While this a large change of approach for builders that have not had to comply with a code, it is not unreasonable given the cost increases of energy, since the R-13 was set back in 1992. Batts

Here is a typical FG batt wall, from 2013.  Notice the compressed and poorly cut areas on the bottom of the right side. Not the gap along the right edge from the top to almost the bottom. Insulation is missing in places. This home had 74 square feet of missing insulation, because batts are hard to install with maximum energy efficiency in mind. How many places on this wall is the insulation not going to touch the drywall.

Batt sideThis is a shot of a wall built in 1965 with batt insulation.  Not much different from today. The installers stapled the batt to the side of the framing. You can see the gap along the side of the 2×4.  This space allows air to move inside the wall and prevents the insulation from working as intended. This can be a lack of training, supervision, knowledge or in some cases trades working against each other. Some drywall installers will not guarantee their work if the batts are face stapled.

This raises the question the builder was asking.  How do I install insulation to maximize the energy efficiency and maintain the drywall guarantee and not drastically change the costs.

The answer was a Blown In System.  Using a loose fill fibrous insulation the contractor can blow the fibers into a netting material stapled to the studs.  There are contractors that do this regularly with mineral wool, cellulose and fiberglass, the three main forms of fibrous insulation. The insulation contractor uses a Blown-In-Blanket© System.  These certified installers receive training and certification based on Professional Standards published by the High Performance Insulation Pros.  Here is their website.  BIBS Sink

This picture shows Blown-In-Blanket© System on a kitchen wall.  I chose the kitchen wall because all of the electrical and plumbing running through it  Very hard to properly install batts. Very easy to install BIBS and maximize the energy efficiency.  BIBS blown in at 1 pound per cubic foot in a 2×4 wall provides R-13 insulation. At a density of 1.8 pounds per cubic foot it provides R-15 in a 2×4 wall. These ratings have been verified using testing standards from ASTM C.665, and C.518. How does the builder know it was done right. Visual inspection helps and the contractor can weigh a cubic foot taken right out of the wall.

In my case as an Energy Rater, the HPIP Association has provided me with a Density Checking Kit to also verify compliance with their professional standards.

I leave you with two Infrared Images.  The Right is a wall with Fiberglass Batt Insulation. The Left is a wall with a BIBS installed insulation.  If the Heat Transfer Resisting properties are consistent over the entire wall, the color will be the same or close.  Take a look and decide for yourself which works better.

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