Category Archives: Home Improvement

Follow Up Thought for Friday’s Summer Cooling Tips.

DeeDee and I started outside. The info from the back deck did not make the cut and I let it slide when i did the blog summary of her story.  So …

Shade Works

This is an Infrared image on one of my first new homes.  The 2 foot cantilever bay clearly shows the effect of the shade. There is a 20° F difference in the temperature between shaded and unshaded areas of the wall. The high temperatures on the side of the house are in the area of 128° F.  It is 97° F when I took this one.

Shade works.  Building a new home with a south facing set of large windows. It is worth your money to have a deck with a roof, or pergola over it. If you have an existing home, the Pergola is a great idea.

Concepts like this have been recommending in my Home Energy Audits.

Why The Way your AC is installed Matters! Part I

Screen Shot 2016-06-24 at 8.49.56 AMThe Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) publishes ANSI Standards for HVAC Contractors to follow. These professional standards are well known in the Home Performance Industry and the HVAC Contractors.  I found a link on their website this morning to a study showing the problems caused with problems that can easily occur if the Industry Professional Standards are not followed.

I covered a study from California about these types of faults recently. This one was completed by NIST.  The National Institute of Standards and Technology, a part of the US Department of Commerce.

CookA quick review of the reports shows many technical details and mathematical formulae.  That forms the back ground for comparisons with other studies.  However, they did write in some plain English for the rest of us. Here is one of their findings, about the performance of heat pumps.

A Heat Pump provides both heat and air conditioning. It is efficient because it moves heat.  In the summer, it moves heat from inside to outside, just like an ac unit.  The same technology and principals. In the winter they move heat from outside to inside. Yes, there is heat outside at cold temperatures.

Think about your refrigerator. When it gets up to around 40° F inside, the unit turns on and finds the heat in that 40° temperature and moves it out of the refrigerator to keep your food cool and fresh. If you watch your temperatures outside, you know more heating is done at 40° and above than at 20°.

This findings for a heat pump cooling your home apply to geothermal heat pumps, regular heat pumps and to air conditioners. They are all working on the same principals.

The first fault they report on is having the wrong size unit.

Changing the size of the heat pump for a given house – either undersizing or oversizing – impacts the heat pump performance in several ways:

  • Cycling losses increase as the unit gets larger; the unit runs for shorter periods and the degraded performance at startup has more impact (parameters used in simulations are: time constant = 45 seconds, or CD ~ 0.15).
  • In the cooling mode, the shorter run periods impact the moisture removal capability (i.e., ability to control indoor humidity levels) because operational steady-state conditions are an even smaller portion of the runtime fraction.
  • In the cooling mode, continuous fan operation with compressor cycling greatly increases moisture evaporation from the cooling coil. However, this impact is minimal with auto fan control (indoor fan time ‘on’ and ‘off’ the same as that of the compressor), since only a small amount of evaporation occurs with the assumed 4 % airflow during the off-cycle with the indoor fan off. If the air conditioner controls include an off-cycle fan delay – that keeps the fan on for 30-90 seconds after the compressor stops – then the impact of off-cycle evaporation is in between these two extremes (Shirey et al., 2006). The results in this study assumed auto fan operation with no fan delay.
  • Heat pump sizing also affects the level of duct losses.

A improperly sized unit will run for shorter periods, and will turn on and off more often. That is just like driving your car around downtown Wichita. Lots of stop lights. Compare you gas mileage to highway driving at a steady speed of 55 mph or higher.

OK, I know efficiency isn’t as important as being comfortable. So the next item is the comfort side.  Running you AC like your car in Down Town, doesn’t remove the humidity as well. Your house temperature is cool, but the humidity is high and you turn down the thermostat again to get rid of the humidity. Pretty soon you are cold, and yet you are not comfortable because you feel the high humidity.  Then you go out and buy a de-humidifier.

The third item is also a comfort issue. That is the advice of many HVAC technicians to set your AC fan to run continuously. When the AC shuts off and the fan keeps running, the humidity the AC just removed from your house is put back in. Oops!

DadBabyESFinally the report mentions duct losses. They are important in a home that has no basement. In those homes ducts can be located in the attic or the crawl space, or both. If you have one of those houses, I would be glad to address that one in the comments. So leave a comment if your are interested.

How do you get a right sized AC unit?   Your HVAC contractor can run a series of calculation found in the professional standard from ACCA Manual J.  It is a Load Calculation.  For cooling it considers the insulation in your home, the windows and size of the home and other details. It can be done on a paper worksheet or a spreadsheet. Both are free from ACCA. Most contractors have a software program to run these Load Calculations.

Load calculations for cooling, are a balancing act. The homeowner wants a home that is cool in the summer and in Wichita, they want the humidity controlled.  Without a lot of formulae or detail, how do, the rest of us, understand a cooling Load Calculation?

My advice is to look at the out door design conditions that must be factored into the calculation.  For cooling, ACCA Manual J has 6 outdoor conditions.

  • Two relate to location. Cooling in Atlanta, is different from Wichita and is different from Denver.
  • One is the outside temperature. The choice is a temperature that covers all but 1% of the hours in a year that require cooling for that location.
  • There are four design conditions that relate to Relative Humidity.

This obviously requires a balance. If your contractor varies from these conditions, it still must balance.  You may or may not like the balance, if one item is changed without consideration of the others.

What should you as a consumer do?

Insist that professional standards be used.

Require that all the items of the standard be measured and reported.

For Air Conditioning the standards require measurements of:

  • Air Flow Actual compared to manufacturer’s requirements. (+/- 15%)
  • Air Flow Static Pressure (ESP)  Actual within the manufacturer’s acceptable range
    • AND
  • No more than 25% or 0.10 IWC over the design pressure for the duct system.
  • Refrigerant Charge Verification
    • Superheat method:  Within +/- 5% of manufacturers superheat value.
    • Sub cooling method: Within =/- 3% of the manufacturers subcooling value.
  • Measured line voltage and low voltage circuits for voltage and amperage. These values shall be within the manufacturer’s requirements.

If you have good air flow in some rooms and not enough air flow in other rooms, your home has an air balancing problem. Have your system checked and balanced. This is known as test and balance or TAB. I have done test and balance work. Generally, the air flows should be within 20% of the design or application requirements.

Hey! It’s Hot Out There! — A conversation with@KWCHDeedee

Interview

 

 

DeeDee from Channel 12 KWCH called Friday morning looking for someone to talk about holding the line on cooling costs as the summer heats up.  We met Friday afternoon at a home in NW Wichita. This 4 year old home was larger than most in the Wichita area. 1800 SF on the main floor with a full basement. The Heating and Air is provided with a ‘Geothermal’ Heat Pump.  This system uses the 55 degree water under ground to provide heating, air conditioning and during these oppressive heat days in July, 2016 – de-humidification.

When I got there, the HVAC techs were there working on the system. It had shut off. The temperature in the home was 80° F and the relative humidity inside was in the lower 50% range. They reported the system was now running and during my time with DeeDee we felt and saw the system working. After a couple of hours, the temperature had dropped to 78°F and the relative humidity was down to 48%. The outside conditions at 2:30 pm, while I was there were a temperature of 98° F and a relative humidity of 45%.  Remember that humidity is relative, thus a higher temperature has the capacity to hold more moisture.  At 8:30 am Friday morning the outside temperature was 81° F and the relative humidity was 75%. Much higher than the inside RH at the same temperature when I arrived.

Not Comfortable

Not Comfortable

I think everyone was glad that the air conditioning had been restored.

DeeDee wanted some quick, easy to do, items for any one to help hold the electric bill down during the hot days of summer.  So we went around the home and we looked at some simple, low cost, easy to implement changes that could be made. These would work in you home as a home owner or in a rental home or apartment. We also looked at several improvements that should be considered.

Where does our energy get spent? Here is a graphic that was in my training text.
HHPie

The variations in percentages are due to differing house sizes, energy costs and types, and lifestyle choices.

Under the quick and easy category, people usually look at lights, electronics, and the thermostat.  Each of these requires the person in the home to do something. Turning out the lights, or turning the TV off, or setting the thermostat higher in the summer.  All of them save energy and thus lower your bill.

I classify all of these and others under the heading of Conservation. Then there are those that fall under the heading of Efficiency. These are things like adding insulation to your home, replacing your weatherstripping on doors/windows, or replacing a furnace / ac unit that is over 15 years old.

The difference: Conservation is changing how people work! Efficiency is changing how things work!  Both are important.

A quick summary of the summer conservation items would be:

  • Turn things, like lights and electronics, off when you aren’t using them.
  • Turn the temperature in the house up and turn a fan on.  Ceiling fans are great. If you need some ideas on ceiling fans, I wrote about them.
  • Reduce or eliminate excessive heat sources in the home. Turning off lights is great. Changing an incandescent to a CFL or LED saves energy and reduces the heat put into the home.
  • Another Heat Source is the Water Heater.  Turn it down to 120 degrees. Most people take a shower at 105° F. A 50 gallon tank with a medium flow shower head will provide 1 person with a shower of more than 30 minutes, with a typical mid efficiency recovery time.
  • Cooking inside produces heat and moisture.  Use a kitchen exhaust fan to remove both of those. They make your AC work longer.
  • Use the fan in your bath room to remove the heat and humidity when you shower.
    • if your fans noise level bothers you, replace them with a quiet fan. In Wichita the bath fans are selected and furnished by the electrician. The code requires 50 CFM to be removed from the bathroom.  Since electrician’s are trained in volts and amps, our common practice, means the person selecting your bath fan will bring the least expensive one. You might consider telling your builder on a new home, to have the HVAC contractor bring a quiet fan that will actually remove 50 CFM.
  • Move tasks that generate heat, such as baking a cake or washing and drying clothes to cooler parts of the day. In the morning or after nine at night are good times.
  • Use a clothes line to dry clothes, instead of the dryer.  In the summer do not dry them inside. That will just increase the humidity and make your AC work more.
  • At least one area electric utility has a demand charge for using electricity in the hot day times of the summer.  It is not Westar Energy. If you use another electric Utility, check your bill inserts, check their website, call customer service, and know when not to use electricity. A demand charge is an extra charge for usage during a specific time. Instead of 15 cents, you could be paying several dollars per unit.

Turning electronics off, such as your TV or computer, also involves the various accessories.  Computers have a printer, and sometimes other items that are plugged in. Along side your TV is a cable box, a DVD player, and other plugged in accessories. using a smart strip will help. A smart strip is a power strip that is controlled by the main device in the group.  So you plug your computer into the primary, and the printer, the monitor and other accessories into the other plug ins.  Now when you turn the computer off, the smart strip shuts the accessories off.  The same with the TV, or a game center.

The longer term changes you make to your home, cost more, and can have a larger impact.  These are the efficiency items.

  • Buy Energy Star certified appliances when you replace your refrigerator, washer and other appliances.
  • If your refrigerator or deep freeze is over 12 years old, I would strongly recommend that you look at replacing it.  The technology is changing fast and competition is holding prices down. Those made in the last 2 years use considerably less electricity then older models.

The largest portion of your energy use from the Pie Chart (above) is heating and cooling your home. The chart shows 45 – 55% of your energy use for this.

The simplest, and easiest to work on, would be the insulation in the attic. Others would include replacing less efficient equipment, considering the use of an exterior solar shade, or other improvement. After the work is done, you can sit back and enjoy your home.

Exterior Shade is a great thing, sometimes easy to do. Trees placed with shade considerations are great. Sometimes the builder can build some shading features into the home.  A wider eve for example. 30 inches instead of the standard 24.  Then the gutter, all work to extend the shade. The link below is to an Infrared image of shade from some builder included features.

Follow Up Thought for Friday’s Summer Cooling Tips.

We did take a look in the attic.  I found an attic that could use some attention. Some levels were in the 14 inch range, some were in the 10 inch range. One place had obvious density problems.  Insulation should be installed consistently level, certainly not lumpy. The fibrous insulation, fiberglass, cellulose, or rock wool, must be installed to the density specified by the manufacturer.  If not, you are not getting what your paid for.

attic

This is the attic from the KWCH video camera. I am reaching into a hole in the insulation and I can see the ceiling at the bottom of the hole.

I found no insulation card in the attic.  I can tell it is fiberglass and it is white. In the past two weeks, I’ve seen 5 different types of white fiberglass insulation.  If you install Johns-Manville Fiberglass, the three products I’ve seen in the past two weeks require 20 inches, another 16 inches and another 11.25 inches of thickness.  These depths would provide an R-49 level of insulation. This has been the requirement for attic insulation in our climate zone.  Since there is no legal requirement for insulation in South Central Kansas, most new homes are insulated to R-30 or less.

Call IR

This was the Infrared Image you saw in DeeDee’s video. I have reproduced it here with the visual light picture to help understand what it is showing.

I would like to thank DeeDee and Betty and Jack Call for their hospitality and seeing their home. I offered the Call’s a no charge Utility Usage Analysis for their hospitality. I will go back with that when I get the gas and electric usage from the utility companies.  Jack expressed some interest in adding some insulation to his attic so I will get some quotes for them to consider.

You can view the story DeeDee wrote and the video shown on the 6:00 news at the KWCH website.

Quality Installation and Maintenance of HVAC Equipment

The news this month has multiple stories about Heating and Air Companies being very busy with units not cooling or not cooling enough.Screen Shot 2016-06-24 at 8.49.56 AM Driving around town, I see most of these contractors have a sign out front looking for help. The wait time is up to two weeks.  In the 7 homes I’ve been in this week.  One had no working AC, one home was on it’s last legs, and two other homeowners were very concerned. For the 1st time in 7 years, I’m getting calls from my website asking if I can fix their AC unit.

This morning I found a report on HVAC Problems, Problem Identification and Repair.  I have scanned this 27 page report and these are the things that jumped out.

Background:  California has some of the toughest energy requirements for buildings, both new and remodeling of existing buildings. These is a direct result of the problems they had 15 years ago, with not enough electricity.  They resulted to black outs, (Utilitys were allowed to shut off electricity to various geographic areas).  and brown outs, (Utilities were allowed to provide only part of the electricity needed to a geographic area).  Both are not good.

These energy codes are generally referred to as Title 24.  A large part of the work in California the last few years has been testing and measuring how well the requirements are being met.  This report is just one small piece of that process.

Title 24 refers to the problems, their identification and repair as “Fault Detection and Diagnosis” or “FDD”

Screen Shot 2016-06-24 at 8.51.18 AM

The Report was working on the answers to these questions

  • Is FDD worth the investment, and what is the savings potential?
  • How effective are available FDD methods and what do they cost to implement?
  • What training is needed for effective FDD and is it being provided?
  • Are codes and standards working?
  • What are the major gaps and how can they be addressed?

This particular session and reporting was limited to:

 

  • System Types–new and existing residential only
    • Air conditioners
    • Heat pumps
    • Furnaces and air handlers
  • Fault Types
    • Low airflow
    • Refrigerant system charge, restrictions, and contaminants
    • Mechanical and electrical faults and faulty installation
  • Repair vs. Replacement Issues
    • Cost-effectiveness of FDD
    • Replacement refrigerants for R-22
  • Human Factors
    • Training and quality of maintenance
    • Homeowner knowledge and expectations.

The reporting included tests applied with standard AHRI methods. The tests were designed to determine the impacts on efficiency and capacity of a variety of conditions, including:

  • Airflow of 250 cfm/ton reduced energy efficiency ratio (EER) by 12% and has the potential to produce a false overcharge diagnostic due to freezing of the coil (the asterisk denotes an unofficial EER)
  • Liquid line restrictions (e.g. due to clogged filter-dryer or metering devices) reduced EER by 30% to 36% for non-TXV and TXV systems respectively
  • Only 0.3% Nitrogen in the refrigerant reduced the EER  by 18% with no TXV and 12% for the TXV-equipped system

Discussion pointed out that California Title 24 charge verification methods, which only measure superheat (for non-TXV) and sub-cooling (for TXV) systems, and ACCA Standard 4, for which only 3% of the procedures are related to energy performance. Also covered were  how improperly maintained vacuum pumps, test instrument error, and poor service practices such as use of rules of thumb contribute to the introduction of non-condensables, improper charge, and other faults.

John Proctor, PE presented a case for making improvements to California’s Title 24 standards, John worked with a team to inspect a large number of recently built homes to identify HVAC installation and performance issues. He began his presentation by defining an “incremental effectiveness ratio” that divides benefits of maintenance by the incremental cost to diagnose, repair, and ensure quality, which is fundamental to the question of the value of HVAC service. He proceeded to show a series of graphs from his experience and other studies that illustrate the deviations from the ideal for airflow, charge, duct leakage and efficiency, and non-condensables, as well as the incidence of occurrence of these defects.

For example, his graphs show:

  • 50% reduction in airflow reduces EER by 25%.
  • A refrigerant charge that is 70% of the recommended charge reduces EER by about 55%.
  • Leaving Nitrogen in the line set and coil at 20 psig before charging with refrigerant reduces the sensible EER by about 45%.
  • From his 2003 survey, more than 60% of the houses checked failed on refrigerant charge, airflow, and duct leakage, and more than 95% failed overall.

Many of these issues result from a lack of training and a lack of follow up by supervisors.

They had some specific things that could be done by builders, HVAC Contractors and home owners to ensure these items do not get missed.

I will read the report in more detail and have further comments.

You may read the entire report.

What is an Energy Audit Worth?

Hose and bucketSeveral years ago, I wrote a post about the value of an Energy Audit.

The story behind that audit was one side.  Improved Comfort. This time it is about the other side.  Decreased Cost of Operation.

An home energy audit reviews the ability of your home to retain the heated air from your HVAC System in the winter and the cooled air in the summer. The best metaphor I’ve seen is to compare the Thermal Enclosure to a Bucket of Water. The picture above is a good example.  The hose is like the HVAC System. It fills the house with hot air in the winter and cool air in the summer.  The Bucket allows the conditioned  to leave the home.

The result of the energy audit is to prioritize which holes to fix first, second and third. Some of this is about how big a thermal leak the hole is, and some of this is about cost.

Attics are less costly to insulate than walls.  There is room for more insulation, it is not a lengthy process, and there is nothing like patching holes after you have insulated.

This home had the improvements made as recommended by the audit, in February 2012.  The energy usage for 36 months prior to and now 36 months after the improvements is now available.

The 3 year average for annual energy use before the improvements is 34,972 KWH.

The 3 year average for annual energy use after the improvements is 18,940 KWH.

A decrease of 45% in energy used.  The bills are paid in dollars, so why refer to an energy measure.  Using energy measures means future increases in Utility Rates are not considered.  Will those increases happen?  Yes! Not counting on them is important. Did they happen during this 6 year period.  Yes, several times. So the results are about actual savings.

IMG_1272 copy

Here is Brian, blowing insulation into the walls. The walls before the work started were uninsulated. If this home had been stucco or brick, this step would not have been cost effective.  The material is cellulose, providing an R-13 in the wall. Cellulose is easy to install in this application. This crew had done this many times and the experience is worth a lot.

IMG_1340 copyThe image on the right is the attic. As you can see there is a little insulation in there before work started.  That meant the crew could do the air sealing first.  Fibrous insulation like the rock wool you see, or the cellulose that was added, does not stop air movement.  Warm air from inside easily goes up into the attic and outside. Good crews air seal before they insulate. They are already up there.  A caulking gun is not hard to carry along.  See those wires,  the electrician drilled a one inch hole to put the wire through.  Lots of air leakage.

Here is a picture I took last winter.  New snow the night before  on the roof of this house. Note the hole near the edge of the roof in the snow cover.  That hole in the snow is right over the outside wall and there is a light switch, or outlet on the wall below it.  Air Leak copy

 

This simple table will keep your home cool

Table 1 Jean-Sébastien Lagrange and Raphaël Ménard with their Zero Energy Furniture Climatic Table.

Consisting simply of a surface and legs, the table is one piece of furniture that has remained largely the same for thousands of years. But now, a French design duo has come up with a way to turn the humble table into a means of climate control that doesn’t use any electricity. Paris-based industrial designer Jean-Sébastien Lagrange teamed up with French engineer Raphaël Ménard to create the Zero Energy Furniture table, also known as the ZEF Climatic Table. The ZEF table looks like any other with a sleek design of a solid plank oak top and angled legs — but it could hold the secret to cutting energy costs by as much as 60%.

 

Table 2A close up of the ZEF table, which could cut energy needs by as much as 60%.

 

“We wanted to see if it was possible to address climate and energy issues on a furniture scale,” Lagrange told WIRED.

Beneath the oak table are a series of phase-changing materials (PCMs) placed between the wood and anodized aluminium bottom. The materials soften when the surrounding room reaches around 71 degrees, absorbing the excess heat, and then harden once the temperature dips back below 71 degrees, releasing the trapped heat with the help of the aluminium and causing a noticeable change in the room’s temperature.

Table SpongeThat means the table is essentially working like a “thermal sponge,” as Lagrange and Ménard put it, sucking up excess heat and then releasing it once the room becomes cool enough.

According to the inventors, the table has the potential to reduce heating needs by as much as 60% and cooling demands by as much as 30%, which could save a lot of money as well as energy.

It’s a feat of engineering that makes the most sense in homes that don’t have climate control.

In climates where the temperature can drastically swing from hot to cold in short spans of time, the ZEF Climatic Table is most useful. For example, if a room heats up on a sunny day and then the temperature drops at night, the ZEF table would make the climate in that room more consistent.

The ZEF table works best in rooms that undergo significant temperature changes frequently.

The Full Article on Business Insider Australia


 

This article is reprinted in part from the above digital source. It was originally from Wired and was brought to my attention by ASHRAE. Phase Change Materials have many applications in heating and cooling. One phase change material everyone uses is water.  At 32°F it changes from solid to liquid or liquid to solid. Of interest to energy efficiency are materials that act in this way around 70°F.

New Efficiency Standards for Hot Water Heaters

The National Association of Home Builders has condensed the DOE page on the new Efficiency Standards for Hot Water Heaters. The good news is if you buy the unit, you can install it, until existing stocks are used up. There are also some alternatives in specifying and installation you can consider.

Elec DHWNew residential water heater energy-efficiency standards that go into effect April 16 will require changes to the installation of many residential water heaters. Most water heaters with a capacity of 55 gallons or less will require more installation space, and those larger than 55 gallons in capacity will see additional, more significant changes. However, products manufactured before April 16 can still be bought and installed after the changeover date.

These new efficiency standards will require much higher Energy Factor (EF) ratings for larger water heaters, making a huge impact, especially on how these types of water heaters are manufactured, distributed, installed and/or vented.

PV DHWThe more common-sized water heaters of 55 gallons or less will likely be larger by roughly 2 inches in height and diameter to account for the additional insulation needed to meet the new standard. This may require builders to account for the increased size in their design.

It is expected that replacement water heaters installed in closets will present the biggest problems: They may require installing an applicance with reduced water capacity, selecting a much taller tank of the same diameter or a switching to a tankless water heater if space does not allow for a simple change-out.

As more information is available from manufacturers and the federal Department of Energy, NAHB will update this page.  Continue Reading

A New Generation of Smart Sensors Aim to Track the Air You Breathe

AQM bitfinder

HARDWARE STARTUPS WANT TO TELL YOU ABOUT YOUR ENVIRONMENT, IN A WAY YOU CAN ACTUALLY UNDERSTAND.

New gadgets are arriving that are designed to show you in real time just what you’re breathing in, with Internet-enabled indoor and outdoor air-quality sensors.

But one of these devices’ biggest challenges, their makers say, is keeping customers engaged by making sure they understand what the readings mean and how to act on them.

“What we think is really important with this kind of product and services, is that we really need to connect on the human level,” says Ronald Ro, cofounder of Bitfinder.

Having participated in the most recent round of the Internet of Things-focused R/GA Accelerator, Ro’s company plans to release its Awair indoor air-quality monitor this summer. The speaker-sized units will share the market with existing smart indoor-outdoor weather stations from French firm Netatmo, and ultimately with wearable environmental trackers from Vancouver-based TZOA, also slated for release later this year.

The Awair will monitor air temperature and humidity, along with levels of dust particles, carbon dioxide, and a class of chemicals called volatile organic compounds, which includes solvents like acetone and benzene and a range of various other substances of varying toxicity.

(Read More – Take the link below)

I found this article on Fast Company written by Steven Melendez The link will get you to the full story.

Indoor Air Quality Evaluations

The quality of the Indoor Air of our homes and offices is an important part of our health and comfort.

There is not much sense in putting a lot of good insulation into a building if it is:

  • Not Structurally Sound
  • Not Healthy

What types of things can be done to improve the Indoor Air Quality of any home or property?

  1. The immediate environment of the structure must be kept separate from the inside.
  2. The required fresh air that is needed, in every one of our buildings, should be filtered and otherwise treated for comfort and to remove pollutants.
  3. The pollutants that are created during the normal operation of our building must be eliminated, removed, replaced, diluted or neutralized.
  4. Moisture in any form must be controlled , and then removed avoiding any accumulation.
  5. Any and all accumulations of moisture damage or animal infestation must be cleaned up and damaged building components replaced.
  • A Full Indoor Air Quality evaluation must address all of those concerns.
  • Full interior visual inspection
  • Full exterior visual inspection
  • Testing of the building enclosure to ensure the outside stays outside
    • Infrared Evaluation as part of the above testing
  • Inspection of HVAC Duct Work and systems that move air.
  • Combustion Safety Inspection on open combustion appliances
    • Moisture, Carbon Monoxide, N02, SO2 and others
  • Infrared and other testing for moisture accumulations.
  • Sample Collection of suspended and/or deposited material that are potential pollutants or irritants.
    • Examination and Evaluation by a certified Microbiological Laboratory of these samples.

This evaluation is typically completed in two visits to the home or business. Level I Evaluation and Testing is non-destructive and not invasive.

Level II Evaluation and Testing involves invasive inspections. These may be as simple as drilling a few holes for visual inspection or sampling. It may involve removing obviously damaged building material, that requires replacement, for example wet drywall.

Contact The Energy Guy for further information about an Indoor Air Quality Evaluation.

The Energy Guy Gets a New Ride …

EG 4

 

OK!  Why a new car?  200K miles on the old one maybe?  Then being able to carry most if not all the equipment I need in one trip?  A moving billboard?

Yes to all of those!  So I had a Party.  Our Derby Chamber of Commerce hosts a Business to Business time once a month from 8 – 9.  Coffee and stuff that is guaranteed to add to my waist line.  They do a Ribbon Cutting when you join.  So I had mine this morning.  Here is the crew that came out for the Ribbon Cutting.EG 5Look closely, those are wooden scissors. Ceremony! So here is the next one with real scissors.EG 2Lots of wonderful people here.  Did they all come for my Ribbon Cutting?  I’d like to think so. This month the sponsor was Nova Care of Derby.

I’d like to thank the Derby Chamber, Mark and his staff Tim and Lindsi for helping out with this party.  I’d also like to thank my Ang’s  –  I had two guests today from Wichita.  Angie Tejeda and Angee MacMurray.  I posted a blog post a few weeks ago about a Twitter Conversation with Angee, take the link. I wrote about Igloo’s and my future plans.  No, I’m not building an Igloo.

Jen and Rick Brown showed up also.  I teach Sunday School with them. Thank You, Jen for the fine photography here.  And Thank You to everyone that came out to my party.  I must also acknowledge the the great folks at Mighty Wraps in Wichita.  Justin and Lori were great to work with during the design and application of the wrap.

If you see my ride around town – please Wave!