Category Archives: Industry Best Practices

A Healthy House Part 1c: How Dry is Dry

rainIn Part 1a, we have looked at how your builder builds your home to keep water from the outside from damaging your home.  He used materials to shed the water and he lapped them over each other, from the roof peak and the shingles all the way down to the ground. And then directed the water away from the house, using gutters and sloping the landscape away from the house. Easy, quick and it looks nice.

In Part 1b, we looked at how your builder builds your home on the inside to keep water where you want it, and provide easy clean up when it does get out of the pipes, the sink, tub or shower.

BucketYou can think of this as bulk water.  You can see it, this is water that is usually measured in quarts or gallons, and it is responsible for 50 – 60 % of the water damage that occurs over time. The exact percentage depends on the source doing the figuring.  So why is there a Part 1c?   There is one remaining source of moisture in most homes.  Water Vapor.  Hard to see it, hard to measure it.  The damage water vapor causes is usually found to be very extensive.

If you have a roof leak, it usually ends up inside and you find it while it is relatively small. When it is fixed the damage is limited and fairly easy to fix.  Leaks from plumbing and over flowing sinks and tubs, is usually caught very fast. The surface is easy to clean up and many times contains the water.  Damage from these sources doesn’t really occur unless the water continues over time to get there.  It stays wet and is not allowed to dry out.

Flood type events are not really of concern here. When they happen, the homeowner is aware, his insurance may cover repairs and there are lots of contractors that will do the work. Generally, they have little to do with how the house was built.

teapotWater vapor is present in varying amounts in every home.  What is the relative humidity in the home?  40% – 25% – 65%?  That is water vapor in the air. We add to that from breathing, cooking, and hygiene activities, like showers and running hot water for various purposes.

How do we control this water vapor?

Spot ventilation.  This may be as simple as opening a window next to the stove where the pasta is boiling, or the tea pot is ready to pour. It may be using an exhaust fan over the stove to actually remove the water vapor from cooking out of the house. Same in the shower.

acWhen the heat and humidity arrive around here, in the summer, it is air-conditioning season. Most air conditioners will lower the temperature of the air and remove some of the humidity at the same time.  Somedays they do a great job, somedays the ac unit really has to work and it.  Occasionally, you will find a unit that makes the room fairly cold, and you just feel clammy.  Like you just walked in from 100° outside and you are wet all over. The trouble is, it doesn’t go away.  You keep feeling cold and clammy.

That is the first way that water vapor causes a problem with our homes, it makes us uncomfortable.

How does the water vapor move into the walls and attic to cause problems like the liquid or bulk water we looked at?  It has two ways to move.  Air Movement and Vapor Diffusion.

Vapor Diffusion involves moving a vapor, in this case water.  It involves temperature and pressure.  It also involves Math, lots of fancy math.  I know some math teachers that can run these numbers, and a couple of physicists here in Kansas.  I’m sure the characters on TV’s ‘Big Bang Theory’ could run the numbers.

Adding MachineThe good news is, we don’t have to run the numbers.  If you take a room in your home with the humidity at 40% and 70° –  you will find less than a gallon of actual water.  By the time all the numbers are done, the answer is:  Yes – Vapor Diffusion put some of that water vapor into the wall.  And we can test that the 7% moisture content of the drywall, studs and other parts of the wall, is now 7.5 or 8%.  Not much change.   If you have read much on this blog, you know I lower my blood pressure by turning wood, into bowls.  Anything less than 12% moisture content in wood is considered dry.

If the builder bought kiln dried lumber, and kept the rain off it, while the house was built, the wood is probably 8 – 9 % moisture content when the home is finished.  Kiln dried lumber is typically 6 – 8 %.  Moving from an enclosed type shed to the job site, wood will pick up a little moisture.

What about air movement and water vapor?  That is the one to take care of.  Uncontrolled air movement takes the water vapor right along with it. When that vapor comes in contact with a surface that is below the current dew point, it will condense and the liquid wets the material.  We know that energy savings is easy to obtain with air sealing.  So fixing the air leaks is good for stopping the water vapor from making our house wet also.   How much?  This graphic from the guys at Building Science Corporation shows how much.

Air_Vapor

This post is part of a series of posts on A Healthy Home.

A Healthy House Part 1b: How Dry is Dry

In the first installment of A Healthy House, we looked at water issues.  Specifically, water from the outside of the home.  Most of this type of water is directly from what the weather refers to as ‘precipitation’, or rain and snow.  Even the ground water we looked at were related to rain and snow.  There are other types of water issues.

pipe_leakFirst would be a plumbing problem.   You can have a leak in a water pipe, or a sewer line.  I know, sewer lines generally do no leak, they slow down, or plug up and then back up.  Either way there is water in the house, and someone is cleaning it up.

Many plumbing leaks like this or sewer problems are an ongoing maintenance issue. Not much can be done during construction.

Situations like the drain line, getting stepped on and thus the floor drain is the highest spot in the floor is a construction issue.  It takes all the trades to help finish the building correctly. The plumber may have done it right, only to have someone else step on the line.

A nail accidentally driven next to a supply pipe, may cause a problem later. If you have copper, 2 dissimilar metals touching will eventually cause a leak.  A nail next to a plastic line that moves, can also create a leak. You may find great work in a home and good, conscientious, plumbers, drywall installers, electricians and others. Sometimes these defects are hidden, like the tip of the nail inside a wall. So maintenance becomes an ongoing effort.

daltile-Bath-Accessories01Thoughtful design can help.  Specifying hard surfaces for areas within a few feet of tubs, showers, toilets, sinks and laundry facilities is important. Most leaks, spills and accidents will occur in these areas. An easy to clean surface that doesn’t hold the moisture is essential.  Carpet has it’s place, just not near water. Some floor coverings such as linoleum or cork type flooring may also not be appropriate for these areas. (Image to the right is courtesy of DalTile.)

 

Hard SurfaceAppropriately located floor drains can help.  Use of appropriate materials in the floor structure is a good thing. Most homes in this area have a basement, meaning a wooden subfloor is under and of these facilities on the main or upper floors.  The proper type of sub floor in these areas is crucial to keeping the home dry. It is also helpful in drying, when the floor does get wet and not encouraging mold growth, as many types of common building materials.

This post is part of a series of posts on A Healthy Home.

A Healthy Home Part 1a: How Dry is Dry? –

rain

Water in a house, Good Thing, Bad Thing?  Some places like the sink you expect to find water. Other places like the floor, water is a problem. Builders work hard to build a home so water says where it belongs.

RoofLook at the way the roof is installed!  The shingles are layered from bottom to top. They are also lapped over each layer. So water, will drain down the roof and off.  If water gets up under a shingle, the roofing crew has done some other things like roofing felt, metal valleys and flashing to do the job.

Look at the water run off the overhang in the top picture.  When it rains most of the water hits the roof, the overhang changes how much strikes the wall. Matt Risinger, a home builder in Austin, TX, tweeted this graphic recently.

Overhang

Do you think Matt builds homes with short overhangs?

SidingThe layers on the roof are repeated for the same purpose for other areas of the house. They work the same way. Some are installed the same way, some are installed differently. Other areas of your home have a different experience with water.

Tyvek TopThe outer layer of a wall, the siding, like the shingles, are lapped. The next layer behind the lapped siding is usually known as house wrap. That’s the white covering you see on many new homes, before the siding is installed. Technically, the term for this is ‘Weather Resistant Barrier’ or WRB. Just as the roofing felt helps keep water outside on the roof, the WRB helps keep water outside on walls.

Just as the roofing felt, shingles, and siding are lapped; house wrap should also be lapped, each new layer draining onto the top of the layer below. The directions call for a 6 inch lap, and then tape. The tape is used on house wrap and not roofing felt, because it is a different material, cap nails should be used.

IMG_7672How does the home buyer know the house wrap is right? It passed a code inspection, didn’t it?  This image shows damaged house wrap. Is it taped and lapped correctly? Are the fasteners used according to the manufacturer’s directions.

Do these problems mean that house wrap is bad.  Certainly not!  House wrap is a great product when installed correctly.  It will do the job it is designed to do; act as a Weather Resistant Barrier. It will then, direct water back outside and not allow it into the wall.

DetailWindows and doors need an opening in the wall. These openings must be detailed correctly or water will enter. These details involve flashings, and tapes. How the window is made, with nailing flanges, with foldable nailing flanges or field installed nailing flanges must be considered. Here we see a tape used to seal the nailing flange to the house wrap.

Is house wrap the only type of WRB used?  No!  It is the most widely used in this area. The others will be covered in a future post.

Now if the roof and the wall properly shed water, and they guide any water that gets inside back out, we get to the ground. At this point the water should be directed away from the house.  Gutters and down spouts do a great job when the ground slopes away. Recommended slopes are 1/4 inch per foot for hard surfaces like concrete, and 1/2 inch per foot for other surfaces. Local codes may require more, or a builder preference may result in a larger grade.

damp_proofingThe basement or foundation walls should be damp-proofed on the outside. This is the black spray applied to the concrete. A tile drain system is installed around the exterior of the foundation and tied into a sump to be pumped out of the home.

 

If these or other equivalent measures are built into a new home, the builder is doing the job right. They are all in the building code. The issue is not what material, the issue is quality of workmanship.

This post is part of a series of posts on A Healthy Home.

 

 

 

A Healthy Home

Healthy HomeBuilding a new home, gives the homebuyer an opportunity to build in all the things they want. The floor plan, bedroom arrangement, windows are all important.

Also right up there is a house that is healthy. Everywhere you look, someone is pitching, this is healthy for you.  We have lots of buzz words for healthy.  Organic, whole grain, anti-oxidant, reduced fat, low sugar, wellness, all-natural are but a few. How do you make a house into a healthy home?  It starts with design and a few simple objectives.   Ideally, a healthy home is:

  • Dry
  • Clean
  • Well Ventilated
  • Combustion by-product free
  • Pest Free
  • Chemical Care
  • Comfortable
  • Safe

read beforeIt seems fairly simple.  We want a roof over our head to keep the elements out.  Hot or cold, rain or snow, we don’t want them in our home.  The dry home starts with a well constructed roof.  That keeps the weather related water like rain or snow out. Then the walls, and the foundation.

Clean may be obvious, or not. Well Ventilated and Combustion by-product free, along with pest free, no toxic chemicals, comfortable and safe seem also to be obvious.  There is a saying about the Devil being in the details.  It is certainly that way in building a home. So a few details on these topics that make up a Healthy Home are important.

I will be posting a series based on the Healthy Home. We will take a look at each of the points listed above and what they mean to the home owner.

Part Ia   How Dry is Dry       Bulk Water from Precipitation

Part 1b  How Dry is Dry       Bulk Water From other Sources

Part 1c  How Dry is Dry       Water Vapor

Part II    The Home Starts Out Clean

Part 3    Well Ventilated

Part 4     Free of Combustion Byproducts

Part 5     Pest Free

Part 6     Chemical Care

Using One HVAC System for Two Areas

My first audit was triggered by the homeowner concerned that the upstairs was several degrees warmer than downstairs. Since we all have experienced Hot Air  goes up, it makes some sense.  In this case the difference was 15° F at 8:00 am, rising to 20° F by noon that August morning.  Yes, it was hot.

4 square craftsmanThere are a number of ways to help this out, for existing homes. Which one is best depends on the specific home, the existing setup and the homeowner.  For new homes, it usually falls to the HVAC guys to work out.

In a new 2 story home, it is common to see two HVAC units.  One in the basement for most of the home and one in the attic for the second floor.  Some builders, concerned with cost, or space considerations, will try a Zoned System.  You can also find Zoned Systems in single story homes, with the master suite on one zone and the rest of the home on another zone.

furnace bypass zoneTypically, the set up uses a bypass and several dampers to control the air.  The wisdom of this approach is that changing the air flow through the unit costs a lot of $$$$.

In the video below, John Proctor, goes through the measurements and calculations of using or not using a bypass and dampers to figure out exactly what is happening.  His conclusion:  The Bypass Damper set up costs 22% – 32% more.

This video is primarily written for HVAC contractors and others interested in the details and workings of air conditioning.  If all the numbers make your eyes glaze over, that is OK.  All you want is comfort, a Bypass dampened system may do that at a cost. It may have the cost and not do that.  So if you are considering a Zoned HVAC system,  tell your contractor —  ‘No Bypass Dampers’!  And refer them to this post.

What Happens After You Finish Your Part of the house, and Then The House Is Finished?

images-2Modern home building takes a lot of people. Concrete, Carpentry, Heating and Air, Paint, Drywall, Insulation, Electrical, Plumbing and many others. These professionals work on the house at various times. Usually there is a sequence, the foundation is done before the framing, the roof is done before inside work gets very far. Toward the end, it can get somewhat hectic. Everyone is trying to finish. The deadline is looming. Painters, trim carpentry, flooring, plumbing, final electrical installations are all happening.

One of the last things is the final work on the Heating and Air Conditioning system. This cannot happen until after the electrician is finished, and if you have a gas furnace, the plumbing must be there. Some of the work by the HVAC contractor was completed before the drywall went up. The duct work was installed and the inside unit of the system was probably put in place and hooked up to the duct work.

If the home is built on a 120 – 150 day schedule, the initial work, rough-in, on the duct system would happen about 1/3 of the way. Then about 2/3 of the waywall_duct, the Heating and Air techs are back to install the thermostat, the outside unit, hook up the electric and finish the job.

Last week, I went out to complete a rating on a new home. I had completed some testing on the duct system at rough-in. I used a Duct Blaster unit and testing the duct system for Total Leakage. I got a great number. There is a professional standard, issued ACCA (Air Conditioning Contractors of America) for this test. It is based on the size of the amount of air flow pushed through the system by the fan; in this case it would have been about 1,200 cubic feet per minute.

The standard is 10% of system air flow or in this case 120 CFM. In a previous blog post, I discussed a test where the system leaked over 100% of system air flow. This is an important test, because it can be compared to the test done at rough in.ACCA_5

The rough in test for Total Duct Leakage came in at 4.8% of system air flow. This is a very good number and typical for this HVAC contractor. Now at final, the total leakage was 16%. Wow! What happened?

I cleaned up and left the house about 6:00 for the weekend. Sleeping on the ‘What Happened?’ seemed like a great idea. I did just that.

Tuesday, I went back to take another look. I would conduct some additional testing to see if the leak(s) could be isolated. I started by removing the grills that fan the air out through each room. That would be easy and fast. So, the first few looked pretty good. It was going fast, I kept going and half way through I found one that showed some problems. At the end 1/3 of these grills had a significant problem.

Duct BootAs you can see the vent in the wall, had the drywall cut too large for the duct. The openings ranged from a quarter inch to over an inch wide, all around the opening. The air instead of 100% leaving the duct system into the room, was being pushed back into the wall. The idea of the duct system is to put the hot or cooled/dehumidified air into the room where the people are. A grill can do a great job of sending the air into various parts of the room. A good grill for one place may be absolutely the wrong grill for another place. Grill manufacturers refer to this as ‘Throw’. If you have the wrong throw on your grill, you aren’t getting much comfort from your system.

The infrared image, below, shows the outside of a wall in the winter (It was 20° F that morning). The hot area below the window is from the grill directing the heat up the wall, not out into the room. I found this condition on an audit last winter and made two alternate recommendations for the home owner. The cost was less than $20.00 for either one. The problem was fixed the same day by the homeowner.exterior_wall

Back to fixing the leaks! I filled the cracks and gaps in the poorly cut openings, replaced the grills and then set up to re-test the duct system. The leakage was back to the original number.

This shows the value of testing your work. We work with Quality Control Systems in our everyday work life. As consumers we depend on the quality of the products we buy. We see how companies respond when they are faced with a quality issue. A number years ago a lot of Tylenol was recalled. A few bottles had been tampered with, not really the manufacturer’s fault. They recalled anyway and their customers were well served. In the past few years, several auto manufacturers have had some problems with their cars, and they did not promptly recall the cars to fix the problem.

qcApplying good quality control lets the customers and the management of a company know the level of quality. The company can make drugs, cars, or install your heating and air system. In this case the quality work done by the Heating and Air techs was changed by another person working on the job. Good quality control found the problem. The fix took only a few minutes. Now the home buyer will not experience the discomfort from a badly installed duct system. I will not get a call in a few years because the home owner is not comfortable. The heating and air techs will not have a lot of call backs.

My thanks today goes to the crew at Cooks Heating and Air in Wichita. They did the quality work and deserve the credit. I am lucky to be able to work with people like this.

Insulation In Your Walls

Poorly installed Batt Insulation

Poorly installed Batt Insulation

I’ve been working with a local builder on his insulation.  He decided to upgrade his standard package of insulation for the walls in his homes. Most homes in this area are built on site with 2×4 walls.  Insulation is almost always installed in the cavity between the studs. The insulation most commonly chosen is a Batt Type insulation.  I’ve seen some mineral wool batts installed during construction in Wichita, most batts are Fiberglass.  They come in white, pink, yellow and a brown.  Color is from the manufacturer, think advertising.

I’ve been working with a local builder on his insulation.  He decided to upgrade his standard package of insulation for the walls in his homes. Most homes in this area are built on site with 2×4 walls.  Insulation is almost always installed in the cavity between the studs. The insulation most commonly chosen is a Batt Type insulation.  I’ve seen some mineral wool batts installed during construction in Wichita, most batts are Fiberglass.  They come in white, pink, yellow and a brown.  Color is from the manufacturer, think advertising.

The concern with a batt type insulation is how it is put in the home. Workmanship is always an issue.  Is it installed to hold the price down?  Is it installed to maximize the Energy Efficiency. There is no code in the Wichita area requiring insulation.  Until two years ago, the recommended code for our climate was R-13 for walls located above the ground. In 2012, the recommendation changed, primarily due to increasing energy costs. The change was increased to R-20. While this a large change of approach for builders that have not had to comply with a code, it is not unreasonable given the cost increases of energy, since the R-13 was set back in 1992. Batts

Here is a typical FG batt wall, from 2013.  Notice the compressed and poorly cut areas on the bottom of the right side. Not the gap along the right edge from the top to almost the bottom. Insulation is missing in places. This home had 74 square feet of missing insulation, because batts are hard to install with maximum energy efficiency in mind. How many places on this wall is the insulation not going to touch the drywall.

Batt sideThis is a shot of a wall built in 1965 with batt insulation.  Not much different from today. The installers stapled the batt to the side of the framing. You can see the gap along the side of the 2×4.  This space allows air to move inside the wall and prevents the insulation from working as intended. This can be a lack of training, supervision, knowledge or in some cases trades working against each other. Some drywall installers will not guarantee their work if the batts are face stapled.

This raises the question the builder was asking.  How do I install insulation to maximize the energy efficiency and maintain the drywall guarantee and not drastically change the costs.

The answer was a Blown In System.  Using a loose fill fibrous insulation the contractor can blow the fibers into a netting material stapled to the studs.  There are contractors that do this regularly with mineral wool, cellulose and fiberglass, the three main forms of fibrous insulation. The insulation contractor uses a Blown-In-Blanket© System.  These certified installers receive training and certification based on Professional Standards published by the High Performance Insulation Pros.  Here is their website.  BIBS Sink

This picture shows Blown-In-Blanket© System on a kitchen wall.  I chose the kitchen wall because all of the electrical and plumbing running through it  Very hard to properly install batts. Very easy to install BIBS and maximize the energy efficiency.  BIBS blown in at 1 pound per cubic foot in a 2×4 wall provides R-13 insulation. At a density of 1.8 pounds per cubic foot it provides R-15 in a 2×4 wall. These ratings have been verified using testing standards from ASTM C.665, and C.518. How does the builder know it was done right. Visual inspection helps and the contractor can weigh a cubic foot taken right out of the wall.

In my case as an Energy Rater, the HPIP Association has provided me with a Density Checking Kit to also verify compliance with their professional standards.

I leave you with two Infrared Images.  The Right is a wall with Fiberglass Batt Insulation. The Left is a wall with a BIBS installed insulation.  If the Heat Transfer Resisting properties are consistent over the entire wall, the color will be the same or close.  Take a look and decide for yourself which works better.

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Those Pesky Directions

How many times have you started into a project and had to stop and redo some steps?  How many times have you finished and then realized that you had extra parts?  So what do we do?

Insulation RulerWe go back and read the directions! The manual!  It is so common there are several acronyms for reading the manual.  Directions written by the manufacturer serve several purposes. Some of the cynics around, including myself, realize there is a bit of self promotion and defense in these instructions.  We should also realize that the manufacturer has probably tried to put a few of these together. He may be sharing his wheel with us, so we don’t have to invent it ourselves.

Most importantly, the manufacturer knows how the piece was engineered. The directions take that knowledge and apply it to how the equipment is set up, used or installed. Equipment changes over time. New features are added, materials change and the way it used to be done, is not a good idea.  So, read the manual.

See the attic rafters above. This is the top of a vaulted ceiling, and the insulator has properly placed an insulation ruler.  In a few weeks, blown insulation will be installed and the tech needs to measure how much. The use of the ruler and blowing the insulation level are two of the biggest helps to installing blown attic insulation.  And Yes! They are in the manual!

The choice of this picture isn’t the insulation ruler, it is the nail grid on the ceiling joists. Machine applied in the truss shop, it is fast easy and effective.  Notice the upper right hand corner of the grid.  That is a sharp edge. Be careful, it will cut things.  Hands, pants, shoe tops. Yes! All of those and don’t ask me how I know that!  My wife makes me carry a first aid kit with lots of bandaids for a reason.Duct 1

The house I finished a rating on yesterday had these nail grids on the floor trusses between the basement and the main floor. It also had the HVAC Ducts run between and through the trusses.  The contractor on this job uses sheet metal supply plenums and take offs. He uses the flex duct to form the return air side of his duct system. Yes!  Flex duct gets torn also. Especially with a nail grid.

Two weeks ago, I tested this home. The duct system was very leaky.  According to the Quality Installation Verification Standard written by the Air Conditioning Contractors of America, it was leaking 100%. Wow!  I’ve tested this contractors work before. He always does better than this.  So I ran the test again. Checked my set up.  No change. So I called him.  Shon came right out.  He looked over the system and immediately saw a couple of problems. Including this section of flex duct.

ZeroNow, two weeks later, his crew has reworked their ducts. I’m back to test it again.  I run the same test and scratch my head.  What leakage –  I can get the readings right. The picture left shows no air flow, on the right side, and a very low pressure difference, on the left side of my manometer.  The procedure is to have the Blower Door depressurized the house. Then you depressurized the duct system with the duct blaster to equalize the pressure.  When the pressure difference comes down to Zero, you read the leakage to the outside of the house.

So I checked my set up and tested again. Still no readings.  So ….   I read the manual.  In this case a Field Guide from the Quality Folks at my RESNET Provider and The Energy Conservatory that makes my equipment. I read it twice.  Then it hit me.  This line: Check the duct pressure. A negative duct pressure indicates leakage to the outside. If the duct pressure measure Zero with the Blower Door running, then the leakage to outside is Zero CFM.

As you can guess, the leaks when I tested two week previous prevented this result. What changed?  The crew had found a small tear in the flex from one of the nail grids. Did you see it in the picture up above?  I can see it because I know it is there.  So I enhanced the image and that one is posted below.  To get around all the reflections of the silver colored coating, I placed a piece of white plastic inside the flex so the hole would show.Duct 2

So reading those pesky directions on a test that I routinely run, gets me the right answer. What about the Heating and Air Contractor.  Shon does good work on his jobs, because he follows the professional guidelines and tests his work.  In this case he knew the test, he knew what it meant and immediately saw how to fix it.  What would have been the result if this basement had been finished out and then he had to remove drywall to fix it?

Why is ZERO duct leakage to the outside important?  I don’t want to pay money to heat or cool the outside. If your ducts leak very much to the outside or don’t distribute the air properly, then you are spending more than you need to.  Installing ducts with no leakage to the outside in a new home is an easy process for the contractor. It give the home owner a much better value.

DuctLeak2 copyYes!  I have found duct leakage behind drywall also.  Here is an infrared image of a finished basement ceiling. The homeowners complaint is there is no air flow into his bedroom and it is cold in the winter and hot in the summer. To get this image I turned the furnace up to about 80° F. It was usually about 73° F.  I stretched out on the basement floor and waiting for the heat from the furnace to leak into the cavity between the main floor and the basement ceiling.  In a couple of minutes I had heat patterns showing.  You can see where the duct is running up and down next to the floor joist. Interesting heat spot to the right next to the other joist. Also across the joist and over to the left joist. So we are seeing the duct and hot spots on each side 16 inches away.  Lots of lost heat not getting into his bedroom.

The home with the infrared picture had the leaks on the supply side of the duct system. The one I tested yesterday had the leaks fixed on the return side. I could not have tested with the infrared in the same way yesterday.

So, on this Independence Day, we celebrate!  We celebrate our freedom to be in a business we love, where we can do some good, and make a difference.  And yes, where we can make a living for our families.  We also celebrate the freedom to know our job, to continue to learn as things change and to utilize our professional standards to keep our customers happy and satisfied.

Have a Safe and Happy 4th of July!

Credits:  Photos, myself.  Insulation Ruler –  Northstar Comfort Systems Install.  Duct system install tested yesterday with no leakage to the outside — Shon Peterman and Midwest Mechanical.  The audit providing the infrared image, my customer Craig. The new home tested yesterday courtesy of Sharon and Wade Wilkinson of GJ Gardner Homes. It is in Fontana.

 

A Tour of the Agco Plant in Hesston

Yesterday, I whet on a tour with the Wichita Chapter of APICS of the Agco Plant in Hesston, KS.  Located an hour north of Wichita, they manufacture farm machinery that is sold all over the world.  The plant originally made powered hay equipment. Here is one of their museum pieces SN 7  made in 1955 a wind rower, which cut and raked the hay for the baler. This combined two operations into one.Hesston Windrower

This one has been fully restored and they enter it in local parades.

APICS provides education and certification in resource allocation for industry. They work in Production and Inventory Management. It is always great to see professionals sharing and learning from one another.

The AGCO Tour was a great tour.  They had 3 guides and each group was about 10. They used a wireless system with each of us wearing a receiver to listen over the noise. I really appreciated that. Our tour guide had worked for AGCO for 47 years before retiring.  He now volunteers to return to conduct these tours. They give the tours regularly. They are expecting a group from Europe next week. Most of their tours are related to sales and service of their equipment.  When you have a plant with this level of expertise, it pays to give tours and put your best foot forward.

The plant has 8 buildings, covering 17 acres under roof.  The have 1,650 employees, including office, technical, engineering and production staff. Some areas work 3 shifts.  They manufacture Gleaner and Massey Ferguson Combines, large square and round balers, and other hay processing equipment.

Fordon Tractor with Windrower attached ca 1925Our guide emphasized that if it was made from metal, it was made here, on site. If it was made from rubber or plastic, it came elsewhere. The metal exceptions were fasteners such as nuts, bolts and screws and the engines for the machinery. The engines are made in an AGCO plant located in Finland.  Remember, their distribution is world wide, so this company makes machinery that goes all over.

The CNC and laser cutting processes, the robotic welders and the paint areas were all shown. The assembly areas and sub-assembly areas were shown as well.  It was fascinating to hear the obvious pride of our guide telling about what was made here and there, in this cell or that area.

I was pleasantly surprised to be shown as much of the plant as we were. It was all open and clean, accessible, and actually pleasant to walk through.  I have toured other plants over the years, small machine shops to large plants.  My last tour was a number of years ago.  The difference 20+ years, and the effect of professional management and leadership makes, is very striking.

Histoical PhotosAbove is a display of some historical photos of manufacturing Massey Ferguson implements 80-90 years ago.

Our guide emphasized the ISO 9000 quality control certification the plant had attained. This process, from the limited information provided, seems to be quite the thing.  We observed the areas reserved for parts that did not meet the engineering specifications.  There always seemed to be one or two part there, but never many. It demonstrated that those production staff, take their jobs seriously and are not shy about meeting their production and quality goals.  I would have wondered if I had not seen some parts being set aside.  No process works perfectly on every piece. Part of my job, as a HERS Rater, involves some quality control. It is nice to see people working, checking their work and sending some back to meet a specification.

The last stop on the tour was their education building. They conduct training on all aspects of maintenance and repair of the equipment manufactured at this plant and other AGCO plants. One of the things they do at this building, is to tear down machines that fail in use. Another part of their Quality Control.

Presentation APICS to ACCO

I understand their not wanting pictures taken within the plant. So, I was limited to taking a few of the group at the end.  The picture above is the APICS group presenting a plaque to 2 of our 3 guides in Thanks for the Tour.  Below is the group turning in their head sets and safety glasses.

APICS at AGCO

NAHB and Greening the MLS

I receive an email news letter each Friday as a member of Wichita Area Builders Association and NAHB, the local and national Builders Trade Groups.  This is titled Monday Morning Briefing.  There are usually 8 to 10 concise articles of interest to the residential building industry. NAHB has an outstanding Research Arm.  Every time they post something they have researched, I learn something.

Some of these posts are self-promotional.  I don’t blame them. They work hard and deserve to put that hard work out for everyone to know about.

In this case, the article that caught my attention relates to work the NAHB has done with other industry trade groups to advance the shared knowledge for builders, buyers, real estate agents, appraisers and others.  Everyone in the home sales transaction benefits from common, verified sources of information about specific homes.

Here is the actual article.  Thank You! NAHB!

NAHB_MLS