Category Archives: Insulation

Hey! It’s Hot Out There! — A conversation with@KWCHDeedee

Interview

 

 

DeeDee from Channel 12 KWCH called Friday morning looking for someone to talk about holding the line on cooling costs as the summer heats up.  We met Friday afternoon at a home in NW Wichita. This 4 year old home was larger than most in the Wichita area. 1800 SF on the main floor with a full basement. The Heating and Air is provided with a ‘Geothermal’ Heat Pump.  This system uses the 55 degree water under ground to provide heating, air conditioning and during these oppressive heat days in July, 2016 – de-humidification.

When I got there, the HVAC techs were there working on the system. It had shut off. The temperature in the home was 80° F and the relative humidity inside was in the lower 50% range. They reported the system was now running and during my time with DeeDee we felt and saw the system working. After a couple of hours, the temperature had dropped to 78°F and the relative humidity was down to 48%. The outside conditions at 2:30 pm, while I was there were a temperature of 98° F and a relative humidity of 45%.  Remember that humidity is relative, thus a higher temperature has the capacity to hold more moisture.  At 8:30 am Friday morning the outside temperature was 81° F and the relative humidity was 75%. Much higher than the inside RH at the same temperature when I arrived.

Not Comfortable

Not Comfortable

I think everyone was glad that the air conditioning had been restored.

DeeDee wanted some quick, easy to do, items for any one to help hold the electric bill down during the hot days of summer.  So we went around the home and we looked at some simple, low cost, easy to implement changes that could be made. These would work in you home as a home owner or in a rental home or apartment. We also looked at several improvements that should be considered.

Where does our energy get spent? Here is a graphic that was in my training text.
HHPie

The variations in percentages are due to differing house sizes, energy costs and types, and lifestyle choices.

Under the quick and easy category, people usually look at lights, electronics, and the thermostat.  Each of these requires the person in the home to do something. Turning out the lights, or turning the TV off, or setting the thermostat higher in the summer.  All of them save energy and thus lower your bill.

I classify all of these and others under the heading of Conservation. Then there are those that fall under the heading of Efficiency. These are things like adding insulation to your home, replacing your weatherstripping on doors/windows, or replacing a furnace / ac unit that is over 15 years old.

The difference: Conservation is changing how people work! Efficiency is changing how things work!  Both are important.

A quick summary of the summer conservation items would be:

  • Turn things, like lights and electronics, off when you aren’t using them.
  • Turn the temperature in the house up and turn a fan on.  Ceiling fans are great. If you need some ideas on ceiling fans, I wrote about them.
  • Reduce or eliminate excessive heat sources in the home. Turning off lights is great. Changing an incandescent to a CFL or LED saves energy and reduces the heat put into the home.
  • Another Heat Source is the Water Heater.  Turn it down to 120 degrees. Most people take a shower at 105° F. A 50 gallon tank with a medium flow shower head will provide 1 person with a shower of more than 30 minutes, with a typical mid efficiency recovery time.
  • Cooking inside produces heat and moisture.  Use a kitchen exhaust fan to remove both of those. They make your AC work longer.
  • Use the fan in your bath room to remove the heat and humidity when you shower.
    • if your fans noise level bothers you, replace them with a quiet fan. In Wichita the bath fans are selected and furnished by the electrician. The code requires 50 CFM to be removed from the bathroom.  Since electrician’s are trained in volts and amps, our common practice, means the person selecting your bath fan will bring the least expensive one. You might consider telling your builder on a new home, to have the HVAC contractor bring a quiet fan that will actually remove 50 CFM.
  • Move tasks that generate heat, such as baking a cake or washing and drying clothes to cooler parts of the day. In the morning or after nine at night are good times.
  • Use a clothes line to dry clothes, instead of the dryer.  In the summer do not dry them inside. That will just increase the humidity and make your AC work more.
  • At least one area electric utility has a demand charge for using electricity in the hot day times of the summer.  It is not Westar Energy. If you use another electric Utility, check your bill inserts, check their website, call customer service, and know when not to use electricity. A demand charge is an extra charge for usage during a specific time. Instead of 15 cents, you could be paying several dollars per unit.

Turning electronics off, such as your TV or computer, also involves the various accessories.  Computers have a printer, and sometimes other items that are plugged in. Along side your TV is a cable box, a DVD player, and other plugged in accessories. using a smart strip will help. A smart strip is a power strip that is controlled by the main device in the group.  So you plug your computer into the primary, and the printer, the monitor and other accessories into the other plug ins.  Now when you turn the computer off, the smart strip shuts the accessories off.  The same with the TV, or a game center.

The longer term changes you make to your home, cost more, and can have a larger impact.  These are the efficiency items.

  • Buy Energy Star certified appliances when you replace your refrigerator, washer and other appliances.
  • If your refrigerator or deep freeze is over 12 years old, I would strongly recommend that you look at replacing it.  The technology is changing fast and competition is holding prices down. Those made in the last 2 years use considerably less electricity then older models.

The largest portion of your energy use from the Pie Chart (above) is heating and cooling your home. The chart shows 45 – 55% of your energy use for this.

The simplest, and easiest to work on, would be the insulation in the attic. Others would include replacing less efficient equipment, considering the use of an exterior solar shade, or other improvement. After the work is done, you can sit back and enjoy your home.

Exterior Shade is a great thing, sometimes easy to do. Trees placed with shade considerations are great. Sometimes the builder can build some shading features into the home.  A wider eve for example. 30 inches instead of the standard 24.  Then the gutter, all work to extend the shade. The link below is to an Infrared image of shade from some builder included features.

Follow Up Thought for Friday’s Summer Cooling Tips.

We did take a look in the attic.  I found an attic that could use some attention. Some levels were in the 14 inch range, some were in the 10 inch range. One place had obvious density problems.  Insulation should be installed consistently level, certainly not lumpy. The fibrous insulation, fiberglass, cellulose, or rock wool, must be installed to the density specified by the manufacturer.  If not, you are not getting what your paid for.

attic

This is the attic from the KWCH video camera. I am reaching into a hole in the insulation and I can see the ceiling at the bottom of the hole.

I found no insulation card in the attic.  I can tell it is fiberglass and it is white. In the past two weeks, I’ve seen 5 different types of white fiberglass insulation.  If you install Johns-Manville Fiberglass, the three products I’ve seen in the past two weeks require 20 inches, another 16 inches and another 11.25 inches of thickness.  These depths would provide an R-49 level of insulation. This has been the requirement for attic insulation in our climate zone.  Since there is no legal requirement for insulation in South Central Kansas, most new homes are insulated to R-30 or less.

Call IR

This was the Infrared Image you saw in DeeDee’s video. I have reproduced it here with the visual light picture to help understand what it is showing.

I would like to thank DeeDee and Betty and Jack Call for their hospitality and seeing their home. I offered the Call’s a no charge Utility Usage Analysis for their hospitality. I will go back with that when I get the gas and electric usage from the utility companies.  Jack expressed some interest in adding some insulation to his attic so I will get some quotes for them to consider.

You can view the story DeeDee wrote and the video shown on the 6:00 news at the KWCH website.

And, Ladies and Gentlemen, Here Comes The Sales Pitch ….

thermal metic headerSince 2007,  all of the large insulation manufacturers and trade associations have been funding research of the Thermal Metric Project.  This project was conducted by Building Science Corporation, a respected source of independence and factually based information about energy efficiency in homes and other buildings.Batt side

The project testing Spray Foam, Fiberglass, rigid foam and cellulose. It studied batts and blown in fiberglass. You can find their final report, issued in June, 2015 on their website.  There are a lot of detailed measurements, graphs and data in the report. It is a good report that will serve well over the years.  The headlines are now beginning to show up in various social media. These are taken from the Executive Summary of the Report. When you see these in literature or social media of either insulation manufacturers trade associations, or contractors —  take the presentation with a couple of grains of salt.

So which ones will be spun for public consumption and what can one do to avoid a sales pitch. Let’s look at the main conclusions.

  • When walls are constructed with the same installed R-value in the stud space, and are air sealed, both inside and outside (i.e. there is effectively zero air leakage through the assembly), they exhibit essentially the same thermal performance regardless of the type of insulation materials used.
  • All of the tested wall assemblies were subject to thermal bridging regardless of the they of insulation material used in the stud space. Thermal bridging through the framing resulted in roughly 15% decrease in thermal performance.

There are seven more bullet points in the Executive Summary that get more technical then most builders and almost all home buyers want to know. For those that do, it is another blog post or reading the report themselves.tweet1

Here is the Tweet that I saw this morning and thought it was worth a Blog Post.

Notice the comparison is Cost.  Does this cost include the cost of proper installation and air sealing?  I have no idea. Following the links back to the website, I did find a cost of $4,000 for the batt type insulation.  Nothing about the size of the home or other details to make a reasonable comparison.

There is also no indication that batts are rarely installed according to manufacturer’s directions.  In the picture at the beginning, the batt is not installed according to the manufacturer’s instructions. In this area Dry Wall installers, will not warranty their workmanship if batts are installed according to manufacturer’s directions.

15aI included the Project’s second bullet point about Thermal Bridging.  Too many times, we hear references to an R-13 wall or R-19 wall.  This only refers to the space between the studs, not the wall.  Thermal Bridging represents the decreased value of insulation because there is wood in the wall.  Wood is R-1 per inch.  So each stud is 1 1/2 inches of R3.5 in a 2×4 wall.  This is the 15% decrease in performance.

The 15 percent also uses the recommendations from NAHB from their 1977 research on Optimum Value Framing. The National Association of Home Builders conducted this research to find ways to remove expensive wood studs almost 40 years ago.  Wood Studs are more expensive now, and still increasing. This IR image shows batts not installed according to manufacturer’s instructions (The Dark Blue Areas). It also shows the wood framing as a thermal bypass, mostly green with some blue on the top plates.

In the end, for the home buyer, a way to sort through all the sales pitch exists. For new homes of half of the new construction in 2013 was verified independently by a HERS Rater.  I do this in the Wichita metro area for builders and new home buyers.

Previous Blogs of Interest:

Installing Fiberglass Batts

Insulation in Your Walls

 

 

What is an Energy Audit Worth?

Hose and bucketSeveral years ago, I wrote a post about the value of an Energy Audit.

The story behind that audit was one side.  Improved Comfort. This time it is about the other side.  Decreased Cost of Operation.

An home energy audit reviews the ability of your home to retain the heated air from your HVAC System in the winter and the cooled air in the summer. The best metaphor I’ve seen is to compare the Thermal Enclosure to a Bucket of Water. The picture above is a good example.  The hose is like the HVAC System. It fills the house with hot air in the winter and cool air in the summer.  The Bucket allows the conditioned  to leave the home.

The result of the energy audit is to prioritize which holes to fix first, second and third. Some of this is about how big a thermal leak the hole is, and some of this is about cost.

Attics are less costly to insulate than walls.  There is room for more insulation, it is not a lengthy process, and there is nothing like patching holes after you have insulated.

This home had the improvements made as recommended by the audit, in February 2012.  The energy usage for 36 months prior to and now 36 months after the improvements is now available.

The 3 year average for annual energy use before the improvements is 34,972 KWH.

The 3 year average for annual energy use after the improvements is 18,940 KWH.

A decrease of 45% in energy used.  The bills are paid in dollars, so why refer to an energy measure.  Using energy measures means future increases in Utility Rates are not considered.  Will those increases happen?  Yes! Not counting on them is important. Did they happen during this 6 year period.  Yes, several times. So the results are about actual savings.

IMG_1272 copy

Here is Brian, blowing insulation into the walls. The walls before the work started were uninsulated. If this home had been stucco or brick, this step would not have been cost effective.  The material is cellulose, providing an R-13 in the wall. Cellulose is easy to install in this application. This crew had done this many times and the experience is worth a lot.

IMG_1340 copyThe image on the right is the attic. As you can see there is a little insulation in there before work started.  That meant the crew could do the air sealing first.  Fibrous insulation like the rock wool you see, or the cellulose that was added, does not stop air movement.  Warm air from inside easily goes up into the attic and outside. Good crews air seal before they insulate. They are already up there.  A caulking gun is not hard to carry along.  See those wires,  the electrician drilled a one inch hole to put the wire through.  Lots of air leakage.

Here is a picture I took last winter.  New snow the night before  on the roof of this house. Note the hole near the edge of the roof in the snow cover.  That hole in the snow is right over the outside wall and there is a light switch, or outlet on the wall below it.  Air Leak copy

 

Buying an Energy Efficient Home

HomePOHThe Annual Spring Parade of Homes is on the last week in the Wichita Metro Area.  There are some great homes out there. Lots of amenities to consider. Everyone has their own lifestyle and looks for a floor plan to fit. They all have their sense of taste and can look at the colors, finishes and visual effects.

POH_S15Every builder says they build an energy efficient home. Energy Efficiency is built in behind the walls.  It is usually not seen.  Energy Efficiency is about people and how they install the items that create the efficiency.  The specific items are less important then the way they are installed. Generally, the manufacturers install instructions must be followed.

Wichita – Sedgwick County has not adopted any code provisions for energy efficiency in new homes.  It may be legal to build a home with no insulation, but is that a wise decision? No one thinks so.  So how much is enough and is it installed correctly?  In this area we are reliant on the free enterprise approach energy efficiency in new homes.

Phoenix, AZ has an energy code, yet the free enterprise market based system has upped the game for buyers.  Here is a recent article in the Phoenix Newspaper about how a home buyer can see what is behind the walls.

Arizona-Republic-Features-of-ENERGY-STAR-HERS

Passive House Verifier Training Part 1

PHIUSPHIUS (Passive House Institute United States) is one of two organizations in the US that promote and issue certificates for completion of a home that uses extremely small amounts of energy to heat and cool a home. The other organization is an affiliate of the German PassivHaus Institute.

This organization is based in Illinois. The goal is to make passive building principles the mainstream best building practice, and the mainstream market energy performance standard.

prosocoWhat is a Passive House? It is a home that people want to live in. It must be comfortable for the occupants and it must use very small amounts of energy to heat and cool; and for total energy use as well. RIGHT: A Passive House under construction.

Design for a Passive Home emphasizes energy efficient features that are installed during the construction of the home which do not have moving parts. The design relies on all parts to be installed to manufacturers specifications. These details are verified after they are installed.

Smith HouseThe idea is that insulation and air sealing are very cost effective compared to large and sometimes complex new technology in HVAC Systems. Instead of buying the expensive technology, use the money, that would usually spent on upgraded HVAC system, to increase the insulation levels. The details of how much insulation, what type and where are certainly of interested to  the builder and others involved in planning and construction. These details are less important to the home buyer, they just want things to work at a lower cost.

I am writing about Passive House construction since I just finished the training and testing to become a Passive House Verifier with PHIUS. You will hear more about the Passive House concept and how it might apply to any home.

Poll: Energy Efficiency is America’s No. 1 Housing Concern

Safety, affordability and privacy – it’s no surprise that these were some of top housing needs identified in a recent national survey of more than 10,000 households. But the No. 1 unmet housing concern, which the Demand Institute that carried out the poll defined as the “satisfaction gap” between what respondents actually have and what they said was important, was not as easily expected: energy efficiency.Insulation

Survey respondents were given a list of 52 housing and community concerns and asked to rank them, on a scale of 1 to 10, by how important they felt the issues were and how much their current home satisfied these needs. The result: 71 percent of U.S. households polled placed a great deal of importance on energy efficiency, but only 35 percent felt their homes were very energy efficient with low monthly utility costs (the respondents making up percentages answered these questions with an 8, 9 or 10 ranking).

To read more continue here

Who Is Building an Igloo in Wichita?

It all started on Twitter. @AIAWichita @moongodess316 and I had some fun over building an Igloo.

Igloo1

I saw this Tweet and immediately thought of a quote from Dr. Joseph Lstiburek: “The Igloo was the First Passive House.” Joe is an engineer by training and has been working with buildings, insulation and energy use for over 30 years. His Building Science Corporation, based in Massachusetts, conducts research and is one of the best sources of verified information on building energy efficiency in buildings.

So I tweeted back.

Igloo2

What is the difference between a Passive House and a regular house? What is the buzz all about?

Strawbale

When you build a home you can use lots of insulation to reduce the amount of electricity and gas to heat and cool the home.

GSHP Diagram

You can use a lot of high tech equipment to reduce the amount of electricity and gas to heat and cool the home. You can also do both.

PHIUSThe Passive House was developed in Germany, so you see it referred to at times as Passiv Haus.

We know that insulation works and that more insulation works better. As the cost of electric and gas goes up, it makes financial sense to add insulation to a home or business. In 2000, the local cost of Electricity was 8 – 9 cents, the recommended level of attic insulation was R-30. Today the cost of electricity is 12 – 13 cents and the recommended level of insulation is R-49.  Both have increased about 1/3 in 1 years. We also know that air movement, cold drafts, makes people uncomfortable and causes insulation to not work as effectively.

Round Metal TubeThe sources of air entering a home are usually related to corners. Since we like living in buildings that have square corners there are a lot of them in a home. Windows do not usually cause air leakage. How they are installed can cause air leakage. The age or the quality of the window does not seem to matter when installation mistakes occur.

PHIThe primary requirements for a passive ouse certification are based on Energy Usage and creating a structure that needs very little energy for heating and cooling. These standards are effectively summarized with these two limits.

  • Total primary energy (source energy for electricity, etc.) consumption (primary energy for heating, hot water and electricity) must not be more than 120 kWh/m² per year (37900 btu/ft² per year)
  • The building must not leak more air than 0.6 times the house volume per hour (n50 ≤ 0.6 / hour) at 50 Pa (N/m²) as tested by a blower door.

In our Twitter Conversation, Angee McBustee tweeted a question about how is building a igloo in Wichita. Then I responded with the offer to run the blower door test. As you can see from the primary requirements the Blower Door result is very important to a passive house.

Igloo4

How good is a Blower Door Test of 0.6, as required by Passive House? Energy Star New Homes require a Blower Door Test of 5.0 or less. New homes in Wichita routinely test around 4.0. In the blower door testing, lower is better.

For standard construction, I have tested several homes at 1.0. There is one home that I have tested with a lower result. A custom home in Butler County is under construction. They had me do a Blower Door test after it was sheathed. No insulation, no drywall. The test result was 0.62. We were able to find several leaks using biometrics and the infrared camera. That was last September. I returned in December to test it a 2nd time, the results were so low, that I didn’t have the right test equipment to measure the result. I would estimate it to be in the 0.30 range. I now have the equipment to test a home like that.

In February, I have been accepted for training and certification as a Passive House Rater/Verifier. Christine is building the home in Butler County, I want to thank her for the push to obtain this certification.

In the Twitter Conversation, AIA Wichita came back and said they were posting an information tweet.

Thanks to Angee and AIA Wichita for a nice idea for a Blog Post.

Insulation In Your Walls

Poorly installed Batt Insulation

Poorly installed Batt Insulation

I’ve been working with a local builder on his insulation.  He decided to upgrade his standard package of insulation for the walls in his homes. Most homes in this area are built on site with 2×4 walls.  Insulation is almost always installed in the cavity between the studs. The insulation most commonly chosen is a Batt Type insulation.  I’ve seen some mineral wool batts installed during construction in Wichita, most batts are Fiberglass.  They come in white, pink, yellow and a brown.  Color is from the manufacturer, think advertising.

I’ve been working with a local builder on his insulation.  He decided to upgrade his standard package of insulation for the walls in his homes. Most homes in this area are built on site with 2×4 walls.  Insulation is almost always installed in the cavity between the studs. The insulation most commonly chosen is a Batt Type insulation.  I’ve seen some mineral wool batts installed during construction in Wichita, most batts are Fiberglass.  They come in white, pink, yellow and a brown.  Color is from the manufacturer, think advertising.

The concern with a batt type insulation is how it is put in the home. Workmanship is always an issue.  Is it installed to hold the price down?  Is it installed to maximize the Energy Efficiency. There is no code in the Wichita area requiring insulation.  Until two years ago, the recommended code for our climate was R-13 for walls located above the ground. In 2012, the recommendation changed, primarily due to increasing energy costs. The change was increased to R-20. While this a large change of approach for builders that have not had to comply with a code, it is not unreasonable given the cost increases of energy, since the R-13 was set back in 1992. Batts

Here is a typical FG batt wall, from 2013.  Notice the compressed and poorly cut areas on the bottom of the right side. Not the gap along the right edge from the top to almost the bottom. Insulation is missing in places. This home had 74 square feet of missing insulation, because batts are hard to install with maximum energy efficiency in mind. How many places on this wall is the insulation not going to touch the drywall.

Batt sideThis is a shot of a wall built in 1965 with batt insulation.  Not much different from today. The installers stapled the batt to the side of the framing. You can see the gap along the side of the 2×4.  This space allows air to move inside the wall and prevents the insulation from working as intended. This can be a lack of training, supervision, knowledge or in some cases trades working against each other. Some drywall installers will not guarantee their work if the batts are face stapled.

This raises the question the builder was asking.  How do I install insulation to maximize the energy efficiency and maintain the drywall guarantee and not drastically change the costs.

The answer was a Blown In System.  Using a loose fill fibrous insulation the contractor can blow the fibers into a netting material stapled to the studs.  There are contractors that do this regularly with mineral wool, cellulose and fiberglass, the three main forms of fibrous insulation. The insulation contractor uses a Blown-In-Blanket© System.  These certified installers receive training and certification based on Professional Standards published by the High Performance Insulation Pros.  Here is their website.  BIBS Sink

This picture shows Blown-In-Blanket© System on a kitchen wall.  I chose the kitchen wall because all of the electrical and plumbing running through it  Very hard to properly install batts. Very easy to install BIBS and maximize the energy efficiency.  BIBS blown in at 1 pound per cubic foot in a 2×4 wall provides R-13 insulation. At a density of 1.8 pounds per cubic foot it provides R-15 in a 2×4 wall. These ratings have been verified using testing standards from ASTM C.665, and C.518. How does the builder know it was done right. Visual inspection helps and the contractor can weigh a cubic foot taken right out of the wall.

In my case as an Energy Rater, the HPIP Association has provided me with a Density Checking Kit to also verify compliance with their professional standards.

I leave you with two Infrared Images.  The Right is a wall with Fiberglass Batt Insulation. The Left is a wall with a BIBS installed insulation.  If the Heat Transfer Resisting properties are consistent over the entire wall, the color will be the same or close.  Take a look and decide for yourself which works better.

Screen Shot 2014-07-11 at 5.09.57 PM

 

 

 

 

 

Those Pesky Directions

How many times have you started into a project and had to stop and redo some steps?  How many times have you finished and then realized that you had extra parts?  So what do we do?

Insulation RulerWe go back and read the directions! The manual!  It is so common there are several acronyms for reading the manual.  Directions written by the manufacturer serve several purposes. Some of the cynics around, including myself, realize there is a bit of self promotion and defense in these instructions.  We should also realize that the manufacturer has probably tried to put a few of these together. He may be sharing his wheel with us, so we don’t have to invent it ourselves.

Most importantly, the manufacturer knows how the piece was engineered. The directions take that knowledge and apply it to how the equipment is set up, used or installed. Equipment changes over time. New features are added, materials change and the way it used to be done, is not a good idea.  So, read the manual.

See the attic rafters above. This is the top of a vaulted ceiling, and the insulator has properly placed an insulation ruler.  In a few weeks, blown insulation will be installed and the tech needs to measure how much. The use of the ruler and blowing the insulation level are two of the biggest helps to installing blown attic insulation.  And Yes! They are in the manual!

The choice of this picture isn’t the insulation ruler, it is the nail grid on the ceiling joists. Machine applied in the truss shop, it is fast easy and effective.  Notice the upper right hand corner of the grid.  That is a sharp edge. Be careful, it will cut things.  Hands, pants, shoe tops. Yes! All of those and don’t ask me how I know that!  My wife makes me carry a first aid kit with lots of bandaids for a reason.Duct 1

The house I finished a rating on yesterday had these nail grids on the floor trusses between the basement and the main floor. It also had the HVAC Ducts run between and through the trusses.  The contractor on this job uses sheet metal supply plenums and take offs. He uses the flex duct to form the return air side of his duct system. Yes!  Flex duct gets torn also. Especially with a nail grid.

Two weeks ago, I tested this home. The duct system was very leaky.  According to the Quality Installation Verification Standard written by the Air Conditioning Contractors of America, it was leaking 100%. Wow!  I’ve tested this contractors work before. He always does better than this.  So I ran the test again. Checked my set up.  No change. So I called him.  Shon came right out.  He looked over the system and immediately saw a couple of problems. Including this section of flex duct.

ZeroNow, two weeks later, his crew has reworked their ducts. I’m back to test it again.  I run the same test and scratch my head.  What leakage –  I can get the readings right. The picture left shows no air flow, on the right side, and a very low pressure difference, on the left side of my manometer.  The procedure is to have the Blower Door depressurized the house. Then you depressurized the duct system with the duct blaster to equalize the pressure.  When the pressure difference comes down to Zero, you read the leakage to the outside of the house.

So I checked my set up and tested again. Still no readings.  So ….   I read the manual.  In this case a Field Guide from the Quality Folks at my RESNET Provider and The Energy Conservatory that makes my equipment. I read it twice.  Then it hit me.  This line: Check the duct pressure. A negative duct pressure indicates leakage to the outside. If the duct pressure measure Zero with the Blower Door running, then the leakage to outside is Zero CFM.

As you can guess, the leaks when I tested two week previous prevented this result. What changed?  The crew had found a small tear in the flex from one of the nail grids. Did you see it in the picture up above?  I can see it because I know it is there.  So I enhanced the image and that one is posted below.  To get around all the reflections of the silver colored coating, I placed a piece of white plastic inside the flex so the hole would show.Duct 2

So reading those pesky directions on a test that I routinely run, gets me the right answer. What about the Heating and Air Contractor.  Shon does good work on his jobs, because he follows the professional guidelines and tests his work.  In this case he knew the test, he knew what it meant and immediately saw how to fix it.  What would have been the result if this basement had been finished out and then he had to remove drywall to fix it?

Why is ZERO duct leakage to the outside important?  I don’t want to pay money to heat or cool the outside. If your ducts leak very much to the outside or don’t distribute the air properly, then you are spending more than you need to.  Installing ducts with no leakage to the outside in a new home is an easy process for the contractor. It give the home owner a much better value.

DuctLeak2 copyYes!  I have found duct leakage behind drywall also.  Here is an infrared image of a finished basement ceiling. The homeowners complaint is there is no air flow into his bedroom and it is cold in the winter and hot in the summer. To get this image I turned the furnace up to about 80° F. It was usually about 73° F.  I stretched out on the basement floor and waiting for the heat from the furnace to leak into the cavity between the main floor and the basement ceiling.  In a couple of minutes I had heat patterns showing.  You can see where the duct is running up and down next to the floor joist. Interesting heat spot to the right next to the other joist. Also across the joist and over to the left joist. So we are seeing the duct and hot spots on each side 16 inches away.  Lots of lost heat not getting into his bedroom.

The home with the infrared picture had the leaks on the supply side of the duct system. The one I tested yesterday had the leaks fixed on the return side. I could not have tested with the infrared in the same way yesterday.

So, on this Independence Day, we celebrate!  We celebrate our freedom to be in a business we love, where we can do some good, and make a difference.  And yes, where we can make a living for our families.  We also celebrate the freedom to know our job, to continue to learn as things change and to utilize our professional standards to keep our customers happy and satisfied.

Have a Safe and Happy 4th of July!

Credits:  Photos, myself.  Insulation Ruler –  Northstar Comfort Systems Install.  Duct system install tested yesterday with no leakage to the outside — Shon Peterman and Midwest Mechanical.  The audit providing the infrared image, my customer Craig. The new home tested yesterday courtesy of Sharon and Wade Wilkinson of GJ Gardner Homes. It is in Fontana.

 

Your Opinion Matters

Insulation!  

There are several different types in common use in South Central Kansas. They all have their proponents and their detractors. This subject is worth asking your opinions on.  The answers are somewhat limited, use the comments to expand on them. You can select two forms.  I would appreciate a comment explaining your choice of two. Two different areas, or a hybrid type assembly.

While this poll is open, it will be a sticky post and stay at the top of the Blog Roll.

What type of Insulation do you like?

  • Rock Wood (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Fiber Glass (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Cellulose (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Spray Foam with open cells (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Spray Foam with closed cells (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Other (0%, 0 Votes)
  • (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 0

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