Category Archives: WABA

‘Show Your Work’ Isn’t Just for Math Class Anymore

percent greenMy wife is a Math Teacher.  She always likes student’s papers that ‘show your work’! This NAHB Report says ‘Show Your Work’ also applies to building and selling Energy Efficient Homes.

An Early Look at Energy Efficiency and Contributory Value examined sales of homes in the greater Denver metropolitan area between January 2012 and April 2014 to determine the impact that energy efficiency has on the home buying process.

Ultimately, the authors concluded, “There is a current lack of researchable and quantifiable data … Until the data is consistently available and easy to find, it is likely that the residential appraiser’s ability to develop a credible opinion of value will be limited.

Among the observations/findings in the study:

  • The percentage of home sale listings citing “energy” increased in both local multiple listing services between 2006 and 2013, apparently indicating that such features are increasingly appealing to prospective buyers.
  • DadBabyESIn a very limited survey the authors conducted of home owners who purchased Energy Star-qualified homes, 96% indicated that if they were purchasing a home in the future, they would like the home to have an energy-efficiency rating so that they could compare it to other homes.
  • According to the authors: “Appraisers need third-party certified and verified energy-efficiency documentation.” Determining a home’s energy efficiency is “beyond the normal scope of work,” knowledge and experience of an appraiser.
  • Although the survey was not intended to estimate property values based on the presence of energy-efficient elements, in most of the case studies, the presence of energy-efficiency features added measurably to the value of the home. Several of the homes featured in the case studies were certified to the ICC 700 National Green Building Standard.
  • It was difficult, and sometimes impossible, for the study’s authors to separate the value of energy efficiency measures from other green features.

NAHB actively supports efforts to educate appraisal and realty professionals about the intrinsic value of home performance, and how certifications like the ICC 700 National Green Building Standard can help non-building professionals and their customers identify high performance homes and appreciate their benefits.

Full Report

Buying an Energy Efficient Home

HomePOHThe Annual Spring Parade of Homes is on the last week in the Wichita Metro Area.  There are some great homes out there. Lots of amenities to consider. Everyone has their own lifestyle and looks for a floor plan to fit. They all have their sense of taste and can look at the colors, finishes and visual effects.

POH_S15Every builder says they build an energy efficient home. Energy Efficiency is built in behind the walls.  It is usually not seen.  Energy Efficiency is about people and how they install the items that create the efficiency.  The specific items are less important then the way they are installed. Generally, the manufacturers install instructions must be followed.

Wichita – Sedgwick County has not adopted any code provisions for energy efficiency in new homes.  It may be legal to build a home with no insulation, but is that a wise decision? No one thinks so.  So how much is enough and is it installed correctly?  In this area we are reliant on the free enterprise approach energy efficiency in new homes.

Phoenix, AZ has an energy code, yet the free enterprise market based system has upped the game for buyers.  Here is a recent article in the Phoenix Newspaper about how a home buyer can see what is behind the walls.

Arizona-Republic-Features-of-ENERGY-STAR-HERS

Be Proactive for a Green Appraisal

greenlightbulbWhen it comes to getting an accurate appraisal for a high-performance home, it’s easier and more practical to take the right steps up front than to try to get a low appraisal revised after the fact.

Appraisal expert Sandra Adromatis, a featured speaker at the High Performance Building Zone during the recent International Builders’ Show, offered advice for securing an accurate appraisal of a high-performance home.

First and most important is documentation, especially of features behind the walls and other items that aren’t immediately obvious.

A good place to start is by taking a close look at the Appraisal Institute’s Residential Green and Energy Efficient Addendum. This is particularly important if the home is built to a nationally recognized program like the ICC-700 National Green Building Standard or includes additional high-performance features that should be documented within the appraisal.

This article appeared on the NAHB Blog.

For the complete article

Ms. Adomatis also presented at the RESNET Conference after the IBS Show. I furnish the Energy portion of the AI Energy Efficient and Green Addendum for every new home rating I do for a builder.  If you would like to see one or see how it would help your building plans, give me a call.

Millennials Seek Smaller Homes, Energy Efficiency, Won’t Sacrifice Details

Originally Published on the NAHB Website
http://nahbnow.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/507029289.jpg

Laundry Room

The survey says: No laundry room = no sale.

 

As Millennials begin to enter the home buying market in larger numbers, homes will get a little smaller, laundry rooms will be essential, and home technology increasingly prevalent, said panelists during an International Builders’ Show press conference on home trends and Millennials’ home preferences last week.

NAHB Assistant VP of Research Rose Quint predicted that the growing numbers of first-time buyers will drive down home size in 2015. Three million new jobs were created in 2014, 700,000 more than the previous year “and the most since 1999,” Quint said. At the same time, regulators have reduced downpayment requirements for first-time buyers from 5% to 3% and home prices have seen only moderate growth.

“All these events lead me to believe that more people will come into the market, and as younger, first-time buyers, they will demand smaller, more affordable homes,” Quint said. “Builders will build whatever demand calls out for.”

Quint also unveiled the results of two surveys: one asking home builders what features they are most likely to include in a typical new home this year, and one asking Millennials what features are most likely to affect their home buying decisions.

Of the Top 10 features mentioned by home builders, four have to do with energy efficiency: Low-E windows, Energy Star-rated appliances and windows and programmable thermostats. The top features: master bedroom walk-in closets and a separate laundry room.

Least likely features include high-end outdoor kitchens with plumbing and appliances and two-story foyers and family rooms. “Consumers don’t like them anymore, so builders aren’t going to build them,” Quint said.

When NAHB asked Millennials what features fill their “most-wanted” shopping list, a separate laundry room was clearly on top, with 55% responding that they just wouldn’t buy a new home that didn’t have one.

Storage is also important, with linen closets, a walk-in pantry and garage storage making the Top 10 – along with Energy Star certifications. In fact, this group is willing to pay 2-3% more for energy efficiency as long as they can see a return on their power bills.

If they can’t quite afford that first home, respondents said they’d be happy to sacrifice extra finished space or drive a little farther to work, shops and schools, but are unwilling to compromise with less expensive materials.

A whopping 75% of this generation wants to live in single-family homes, and 66% prefer to live in the suburbs. Only 10% say they want to stay in the central city. Compared to older generations, Millennials are more likely to want to live downtown, but it’s still a small minority share, Quint said.

Panelist Jill Waage, editorial director for home content at Better Homes and Gardens, discussed Millennials’ emphasis on the importance of outdoor living and that generation’s seamless use of technology, and how those two trends play into their home buying and home renovation decisions.

Because they generally don’t have as much ready cash or free time as older home owners, Millennials seek less expensive, low-maintenance choices like a brightly painted front door, strings of garden lights and landscaping that needs less watering and mowing, like succulent plants and larger patios.

They’re also very comfortable with their smartphones and tablets, and increasingly seek ways to control their heating and air-conditioning and security and lighting as well as electronics like televisions and sound systems from their phones. “They want to use their brains for other things, not for remembering whether they adjusted the heat or closed the garage door,” Waage said.

Get more details about the NAHB survey in this post from Eye on the Economy.

I emphasized the two comments about Energy Efficient Features NAHB found.  If you would like help in addressing these in a cost effective manner for your buyers, Call The Energy Guy!

What Counts? Product A or Product B

Blower Door Testing & Weather Resistant Barrier

Tyvek TopThe practice of covering sheathing with asphalt impregnated papers has given way to the use of synthetic fabrics, known as house wrap; or spray on coatings. There are factory applied coatings on some brands of sheathing and some types of coatings are field applied. Along with the discussions of fiberglass / cellulose in the insulating of homes, there has been plenty of discussion about the merits of one form or another of WRBs.

As with any step in the building process, I believe it is less about the product and more about the people. Products that are hard to install will be less successful then others. Installers that are not properly trained; work that is not verified in some manner can defeat the proper performance of the best products.

WRBWhat does the WRB do for a home. First it provides a drainage plane behind the siding to divert rain and other weather related moisture from wetting the sheathing. Second, when all manufacturers install instructions are followed it can act as an air barrier, reducing infiltration. For the house wrap type fabrics, this means properly lapped, using capped fasteners, and then taped. Finding house wrap installed according to manufacturer’s install directions is rare.

When all three of these directions are not followed, not only are the potential qualities of an air barrier not present, the potential for water to run behind an uncapped fastener, or an incorrectly lapped joint, which is also untaped. Repeated wetting of the sheathing over time, will eventually result in rot and the accompanying problems.

Country HollowA local Wichita Home Builder, G.J. Gardner has just finished two homes based on the same floor plan. These homes went through the independent verification process involved in obtaining a HERS Rating. These homes utilized the same sub-contractors and types of insulation. The only difference in construction was the use of a job site applied spray on WRB, in place of a house wrap type fabric.

One part of this verification process is a Blower Door Test. This test simulates the effects of a 20 mph wind on all sides of the home at the same time. Blower Door testing has been completed on homes since the late 1970’s. Energy efficiency programs and building codes have consistently recognized the value of a Blower Door test on each home.

BlowerDoorThe value of doing a Blower Door test on each home is primarily to check the work of all subs has not compromised the Builder’s plan for an energy efficient home. Many existing homes, have a test rate of 7 – 12 or higher rates of air exchange during the test. The 2012 code requirement is 3 on this scale, and lower is better.

The use of 4×8 sheet goods for sheathing and other simple, and inexpensive techniques have brought the infiltration rates down. This reduces the cases of cold drafty homes, and significantly lowering the energy use of a home.

The Blower Door test can verify the quality of work involved with installing the WRB, specifically the degree of sealing of the outside of the sheathing. In the case of the two homes involved in this comparison, there was a change of 20% in the measured infiltration rates of the two homes.

In completing the Blower Door tests, we used the ANSI / RESNET published standard of a Multi-point test. These results were entered into a software package provided by the maker of the blower door, The Energy Conservatory, Below is a comparison screen between the two Blower Door Tests.

Tectite 2 Bldg Comp Data

I would like to thank Wade Wilkinson, with GJ Gardner of Wichita; his subcontractors and their technicians for building quality energy efficient homes. I enjoy being able to verify the quality of their work.

If you would like to see this home, it is currently in the Fall 2014, WABA Parade of Homes.  It is located in the Country Hollow Development.  Between Kellogg and Harry on 127th and East to Glen Hills Court, on the corner.  Find out also about the HERS Index earned by this home. It will save you operating costs on your Energy Bills.

International Code Council Adopts Energy Rating Index Compliance Option into the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code

This was released today!  The NAHB noted the approval through their Twitter Stream @NAHB on Tuesday!  More options to meet the Energy Code!  Great way to provide flexibility for all builders. One more reason for adoption of an Energy Code in Wichita/Sedgwick County.

Factsheet on adding the HERS Index compliance path

TEXT OF ANNOUNCEMENT:
On October 7, 2013, the International Code Council (ICC) voted to incorporate an optional Energy Rating Index compliance path into the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) at its meeting in Atlantic City.

The ICC action establishes a new voluntary performance compliance path for the 2015 version of the IECC the “Energy Rating Index”.  The Energy Rating Index is a numeric score where “100” is equivalent to the 2006 IECC and “0” is equivalent to a net-zero energy home.  The current HERS Index Score is compatible to the Energy Rating Index requirements.  This means a builder can use a HERS rating to comply with the 2015 IECC.

The adopted new performance path also requires that a builder must meet the mandatory envelope requirements of the 2009 IECC.

The rating scores that were adopted by the IECC are:

Regions 1 and 2                52
Region 3                           51
Region 4                           54
Region 5                           55
Region 6                           54
Region 7 and 8                  53

The new compliance path was proposed by the Natural Resources Defense Council, Institute of Market Transformation and the Britt/Makela Group.

RESNET backed an amendment that represented a compromise on higher rating scores that was reached between the Leading Builders of America and the cosponsors.  This amendment, however, was defeated.

RESNET Executed Director Steve Baden lauded the ICC’s action as a “victory for consumers and builders.  Homes complying through this path will be higher performing hence having lower utility bills while at the same time provides more flexibility to builders in meeting the code.  The action is also a big step for RESNET and the HERS industry.  With this new responsibility RESNET has to step up its game and make a concentrated effort to ensure consistent and accurate HERS Index Scores.”

Much appreciation must be expressed to our partners for their effective leadership.  Without the leadership of the by the Natural Resources Defense Council, Leading Builders of America, Institute of Market Transformation and the Brill/Makela Group this would not have been possible.  Support from the National Home Builders Association, North American Insulation Manufacturers Association, DOW, Green Building Coalition and the Southwest Energy Efficiency Program was critical as well as the more than 150 RESNET member companies and organizations added their voices in support of this effort.

Your Opinion Matters

I have a new feature on the website.  Polls.  Here is the first one.

The Wichita Area Builders Association just completed the Spring 2013 Parade of Homes.   If you went out to see some of the entries.  Let us know how many homes you visited.  Comments are available below.

While this poll is open, it will be a sticky post and stay at the top of the Blog Roll.

WABA Spring Parade of Homes: How Many Homes Did You Visit

  • 10 - 20 (100%, 2 Votes)
  • Up to 10 (0%, 0 Votes)
  • Over 20 (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 2

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Question about Builders

google_adwordsGoogle Adwords is one way to promote a product or service.  I have used their approach in the past and currently have an ad campaign going. This campaign promotes New Home Buyers asking Builders ‘What is the HERS Score!’  The HERS Score is a transparent method the Builder can use to educate the buyers, appraisers and others essential to a success of the sales transaction.

I saw an interesting Google Referral today that is worth Blogging about.

The search term used was:  “Best HERS Rated Builder in Wichita”

The short answer is, there isn’t a best builder. That is because a HERS Rating is for a specific home, not for a builder.

images-1A HERS Rating looks at the features of a specific home and evaluates how well they are installed. The builder can specify a great furnace. The quality of the workmanship that is put into installing that furnace will effect the HERS Score.  Insulation is treated the same way.

The HERS Score shows the difference between two or more homes.  A new home buyer may be best served with a HERS Index in the low 90s.  A second new home buyer may be best served with a HERS Index in the upper 70s.

That reasoning, on the best Index Score, is best covered in another post.

HERS-scaleVAny builder can choose to build with either HERS Score above. Using one or the other does not make a builder better, it means the builder is meeting the needs of the buyer.

The HERS Score is a way of demonstrating transparency from the builder to the buyer to the realtor, the appraiser and others involved in the transaction.

NAHB and Greening the MLS

I receive an email news letter each Friday as a member of Wichita Area Builders Association and NAHB, the local and national Builders Trade Groups.  This is titled Monday Morning Briefing.  There are usually 8 to 10 concise articles of interest to the residential building industry. NAHB has an outstanding Research Arm.  Every time they post something they have researched, I learn something.

Some of these posts are self-promotional.  I don’t blame them. They work hard and deserve to put that hard work out for everyone to know about.

In this case, the article that caught my attention relates to work the NAHB has done with other industry trade groups to advance the shared knowledge for builders, buyers, real estate agents, appraisers and others.  Everyone in the home sales transaction benefits from common, verified sources of information about specific homes.

Here is the actual article.  Thank You! NAHB!

NAHB_MLS

Features Most Likely to Show up in Typical Single-family Home in 2014

The National Association of Home Builders has a great research department.  I’ve learned a lot about building technology and marketing from some of their reports. They published another one today.

You can see the original on NAHB. 

Guess what The Energy Guy picked up on?  Only one guess now!

Features 2014

 

Five of the 18 items relate to Energy Efficiency. That is 27%.  One more study that shows the importance of Energy Efficiency to Home Buyers. The article is fairly clear there are many more features surveyed that ranked below this, these are the features a builder needs to provide and point out.

The last one lists ‘Insulation higher than required by code’  –  Since Wichita/Sedgwick County has not adopted an Energy Code this is up for grabs.  Until last year the recommended code for Attic insulation was R-38.  Most builders in the area only install R-30 or even less.  I’ve had several builders tell me they put R-38 in the attic and when I get to the attic, I see the Insulation Company’s Attic Card showing R-30.  One reason that Independent 3rd party Verification is important.  This is an important part of a HERS Index on a new home. The current code recommends R-49 in the attic. As energy prices go up, it makes more sense to have additional insulation.

There are two window items of interest.  First is the desire for Low E  windows.  This is a type of coating on 1 side of one of the panes of a double or triple pane window.  Which side and which pane it is on is very important.  On the wrong pane, the window is designed for Brownsville, TX not Wichita, KS.

Second is the desire for Energy Star certified windows.   Window requirements change with the climate.  If you are in Minnesota, your weather requires a different window specifications than the weather in Kansas. Keep in mind, that Oklahoma is a different climate for certification than Kansas.  I have found a number of new homes in Wichita, that are built with Energy Star windows, if you are in Oklahoma.Climate zones

Finally,  a Lo-E coating on the window helps in the summer time with solar heat gain.  Lo-E is part of the recipe for building a window. Residential windows are certified to Independent Standards and should carry an NFRC Sticker.  Again, checking the NFRC sticker for specifications is part of the Independent Third Party Verification that is part of the HERS Index.

Ask to see the HERS Rating on all new homes you look at.  If there is not a HERS Index, ask the Builder to place a rating on their work.