Daily Archives: August 7, 2014

A Healthy Home

Healthy HomeBuilding a new home, gives the homebuyer an opportunity to build in all the things they want. The floor plan, bedroom arrangement, windows are all important.

Also right up there is a house that is healthy. Everywhere you look, someone is pitching, this is healthy for you.  We have lots of buzz words for healthy.  Organic, whole grain, anti-oxidant, reduced fat, low sugar, wellness, all-natural are but a few. How do you make a house into a healthy home?  It starts with design and a few simple objectives.   Ideally, a healthy home is:

  • Dry
  • Clean
  • Well Ventilated
  • Combustion by-product free
  • Pest Free
  • Chemical Care
  • Comfortable
  • Safe

read beforeIt seems fairly simple.  We want a roof over our head to keep the elements out.  Hot or cold, rain or snow, we don’t want them in our home.  The dry home starts with a well constructed roof.  That keeps the weather related water like rain or snow out. Then the walls, and the foundation.

Clean may be obvious, or not. Well Ventilated and Combustion by-product free, along with pest free, no toxic chemicals, comfortable and safe seem also to be obvious.  There is a saying about the Devil being in the details.  It is certainly that way in building a home. So a few details on these topics that make up a Healthy Home are important.

I will be posting a series based on the Healthy Home. We will take a look at each of the points listed above and what they mean to the home owner.

Part Ia   How Dry is Dry       Bulk Water from Precipitation

Part 1b  How Dry is Dry       Bulk Water From other Sources

Part 1c  How Dry is Dry       Water Vapor

Part II    The Home Starts Out Clean

Part 3    Well Ventilated

Part 4     Free of Combustion Byproducts

Part 5     Pest Free

Part 6     Chemical Care

Using One HVAC System for Two Areas

My first audit was triggered by the homeowner concerned that the upstairs was several degrees warmer than downstairs. Since we all have experienced Hot Air  goes up, it makes some sense.  In this case the difference was 15° F at 8:00 am, rising to 20° F by noon that August morning.  Yes, it was hot.

4 square craftsmanThere are a number of ways to help this out, for existing homes. Which one is best depends on the specific home, the existing setup and the homeowner.  For new homes, it usually falls to the HVAC guys to work out.

In a new 2 story home, it is common to see two HVAC units.  One in the basement for most of the home and one in the attic for the second floor.  Some builders, concerned with cost, or space considerations, will try a Zoned System.  You can also find Zoned Systems in single story homes, with the master suite on one zone and the rest of the home on another zone.

furnace bypass zoneTypically, the set up uses a bypass and several dampers to control the air.  The wisdom of this approach is that changing the air flow through the unit costs a lot of $$$$.

In the video below, John Proctor, goes through the measurements and calculations of using or not using a bypass and dampers to figure out exactly what is happening.  His conclusion:  The Bypass Damper set up costs 22% – 32% more.

This video is primarily written for HVAC contractors and others interested in the details and workings of air conditioning.  If all the numbers make your eyes glaze over, that is OK.  All you want is comfort, a Bypass dampened system may do that at a cost. It may have the cost and not do that.  So if you are considering a Zoned HVAC system,  tell your contractor —  ‘No Bypass Dampers’!  And refer them to this post.